Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


Recommended Posts

I saw four movies over the last four weeks:  Point of Order is an interesting documentary about the Army-McCarthy hearings.  The Wedding Banquet is, like most of Ang Lee's movies, a manipulative crowd-pleaser.  Snowpiercer is a much better movie, which gets more interesting as it proceeds.  The Lego Movie is amusing and clever in places, even if it hits too many Hollywood screenplay beats a bit too neatly.

I loved The Lego Movie! It was hilarious.  One of my favorite parts is when Batman says something to the effect of "oh right, like a spaceship is suddenly going to appear" and all of a sudden, here comes the Millennium Falcon with Han Solo, C3PO and Lando Calrizian (sp?) enroute to some party.  My husband and I had to kill some time before a Tool concert and we saw this movie right before going to that.  Quite the contrast in activities, but it was fun. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I've seen five movies in the last two weeks.  Frozen is indeed the best non-Pixar animated since Aladdin, though since Lilo and Stitch the only one I've seen is Tangled.  It's generally more competent than that movie, with better songs, slightly more complex characters and even though it's not really a version of "The Snow Queen," allusions to that oddly enough go a long way for me.  Bombshell is a classic screwball comedy, and I should try to see it again next month when TCM rebroadcasts it.  Boyhood is the critical favorite of the month, and it is worth watching.  It's not the greatest movie that some critics are calling it.  It takes a lot of time for Mason Evans Jr., to develop a proper personality:  Linklater is better with adolescents than small children.  I'd also point out something Armond White alluded to in his yet unread critique:  these are people in the top 20 percentile who think they're in the top 50.  The Brick and the Mirror is even better, and important since it shows that Iranian cinema didn't start with the Iranian revolution, or even with the 1970 feature The Cow.  Like many Iranian films that critics admire, it shows the strong influence of Italian humanist neo-realism.  The story is about a cab driver who finds that a passenger has left her baby in his cab.  The movie then shows how 1965 Teheran goes out of its way to help him with his problem.  Just kidding!  Almost everyone is extremely unhelpful.  The movie also alludes to more sex that post 1979 Iranian movies.  Finally there is My Summer of Love, about a teenage lesbian romance in Britain.  While thoroughly competent, one finds that its restraint hides a lack of depth.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw three movies last week.  The Glass Key starts off interestingly, and it does have its qualities.  On the other hand there are too many twists with the ending.  Wild Boys of the Road is an interesting depression era movie that is actually about the depression.  I'm not sure about the start, since most Americans, and therefore most poor Americans, didn't have the opportunity to go to high school in the thirties.  And the ending isn't the most profound.  But in between there is something worth seeing.  The Three Caballeros is actually quite a surprise.  Often it is rather inventive and imaginative, and it belies the ideas that only Tex Avery cartoons emphasized lust.  While clearly this is not the most thoughtful or profound look at Latin America, it's well worth seeing.  This is clearly the movie of the week.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw three movies last week.  The Glass Key starts off interestingly, and it does have its qualities.  On the other hand there are too many twists with the ending.  Wild Boys of the Road is an interesting depression era movie that is actually about the depression.  I'm not sure about the start, since most Americans, and therefore most poor Americans, didn't have the opportunity to go to high school in the thirties.  And the ending isn't the most profound.  But in between there is something worth seeing.  The Three Caballeros is actually quite a surprise.  Often it is rather inventive and imaginative, and it belies the ideas that only Tex Avery cartoons emphasized lust.  This is clearly the movie of the week.

I love The Three Cabelleros! That was a great film with fun music. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of my personal "premieres" over the last week, by far my favorite was Coal Miner's Daughter.  Needless to say, I'm hopelessly enamored with the young Sissy Spacek in every possible way.  I can't believe I'd never seen this movie before.

 

Biggest disappointment:  Le Joli Mai, partly because it was kind of dry, and partly because the subtitles were terrible----small white letters on backgrounds that all too often were things like white shirts.  I was hoping against hope that it would have more on the political events of that month, which was when competing Left Wing and Right Wing demonstrations were rocking Paris nearly every day in the wake of Algerian independence.

 

If I count repeat viewings, the best one was Wild Boys of the Road, and the least interesting was Hitler's Children, which was little more than a typical wartime Hollywood propaganda effort.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw four movies last week:  Saludos Amigos is a rather short feature film, little more than forty minutes, and its four sketches are cute, but not nearly as interesting as its sequel The Three CaballerosThe Black Power Mix-Tape, a documentary from Swedish journalists about the black power movement, is only intermittently intelligent, and could be a lot more critical about its subjects.  The 1994 Little Women is worth watching, and I suppose I should see it and the 1933 version to see why I wasn't moved by it as by the Cukor version.  Finally Millions is a charming movie that isn't quite substantial enough for me.  I wonder why.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw three movies last week.  Hill 24 Doesn't Answer is not a bad film by any means, and it's an interesting movie.  But it says something about how Israel perceived and perceives itself that a Nazi mercenary gets more time to articulate his views than any of the Arabs the characters are fighting.  Death by Hanging was clearly the movie of the week, a distinct example of the theatre of the absurd, but cinematically and thematically involving.  A Korean condemned to hang for rape and murder survives his hanging, but in such shock that he loses his memory.  The execution officials goes to increasingly elaborate and absurd measures to restore it so that they can hang him.  Finally Broken Flowers is so dead-pan, audiences may forget to laugh.  Yet it's more emotionally convincing that all but a few Hollywood films.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last week I saw five feature films.  Brave is certainly amusing, and it has the many nice touches that Pixar movies usually have (those mischievious triplets are a hoot).  But it's not the best of Pixar movies, and despite having a female co-director and three female co-screenwriters, I think it's because the mother-daughter relationship at the heart of the film is ultimately too pat and conventional.  Back and Forth is the kind of experimental film that I find interesting, and most others won't.  Basically it's 49 minutes or so of Michael Snow panning a camera back and forth a schoolroom, sometimes slowly, sometimes with people walking in, and sometimes very quickly and finally quite vertically.  I Never Sang For My Father isn't a bad family drama, but despite its pessimistic ending compared to O'Neill and Cassavetes it's kind of superficial.  Other Men's Women continues my trend of not entirely satisfying William Wellman movies.  I suppose it's bad luck on Wellman's part to have a cast with Cagney, Astor and Blondell, and have them all in supporting roles.  Nor is it quite clear what the purpose of the final sacrifice was supposed to be.  Finally, there is The Beat my Heart Skipped.  It's an interesting movie, and I suppose I wonder why I did not care more for it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last week I saw five feature films.  Brave is certainly amusing, and it has the many nice touches that Pixar movies usually have (those mischievious triplets are a hoot).  But it's not the best of Pixar movies, and despite having a female co-director and three female co-screenwriters, I think it's because the mother-daughter relationship at the heart of the film is ultimately too pat and conventional.  Back and Forth is the kind of experimental film that I find interesting, and most others won't.  Basically it's 49 minutes or so of Michael Snow panning a camera back and forth a schoolroom, sometimes slowly, sometimes with people walking in, and sometimes very quickly and finally quite vertically.  I Never Sang For My Father isn't a bad family drama, but despite its pessimistic ending compared to O'Neill and Cassavetes it's kind of superficial.  Other Men's Women continues my trend of not entirely satisfying William Wellman movies.  I suppose it's bad luck on Wellman's part to have a cast with Cagney, Astor and Blondell, and have them all in supporting roles.  Nor is it quite clear what the purpose of the final sacrifice was supposed to be.  Finally, there is The Beat my Heart Skipped.  It's an interesting movie, and I suppose I wonder why I did not care more for it.

I really liked Brave; but I agree that it isn't Pixar's best effort.  My favorites are Wall-E, Up, A Bug's Life and Ratatouille

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite was Contempt.  I really hope TCM will show this more often.  It proved that Brigitte Bardot was far more than a sex kitten, and featured the charming Fritz Lang.  By the way, for those who aren't thrilled with subtitles, there is lots of English spoken by the character of an interpreter.   

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It's been two weeks since I last checked in.  The first week I saw only two movies.  Source Code has an interesting time travel theme that becomes progressively less plausible.  Apparently incredible complex laws of basic physics can be overcome by will power and the power of love.  Umm, no, not really.  Shanghai Dream was a 2005 Cannes submission that I suspect would have been more successful had I watched a properly subtitled copy.  The next week was far more interesting.  Mission Impossible:  Ghost Protocol is the best action movie I've seen since The Incredibles which makes sense since both movies come from the same director.  A River Called Titas is also an interesting movie, if not entirely successful.  Its elliptical manner can be confusing in places (why is the river drying up?  why is the protagonist not leaving?).  And notwithstanding the fact that Ritwik Ghatak was a communist party member, the movie appears less political than say, The Tree of Wooden Clogs.  Part of the problem, I suppose, is that the second half is less unified than the first half.  The Zero Theorem may not be Terry Gilliam's best movie, but it's so visually stunning that I don't really care.  Swing High, Swing Low is another example of very competent Mitchell Leisen movies.  By contrast Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is not fully successful.  The basic idea was never very plausible in the first place, and the movie here is more a series of cliches about the ambiguity of war, while the apes' victory is not very plausible.  Gone Girl is better than The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,  less successful than Se7en or Zodiac.  It's more like Panic Room, I suppose.  It's worth watching, in any case.  Sunday, Bloody Sunday, I'm afraid, is more the idea of a good movie, or a provocative one, about a bisexual love triangle and a homosexual who isn't a mincing queen, rather than a fully successful movie.  The Alexander Sokurov Faust is very good indeed, with particularly striking film making, and the best movie I've seen in months.

 

I should add that I also resaw the 1994 Gilliam Armstrong Little Women and it's very much worth rewatching.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Khartoum was better than I remembered and would definitely make my top 10 list for 1966. Line after line could have come from a contemporary movie. Charismatic Muslim leader wants to be acknowledged throughout the Muslim world and will kill all who oppose him. Western leader who has no imperialist ambitions and will do as little as possible to oppose him, frustrating the designs of some of his advisers. This didn't resonate in 1966, but it certainly does now. Exemplary cinematography by Edward Scaife, sometimes billed as Ted Scaife, and best known to me for his brilliant work on The Kremlin Letter. Charlton Heston wouldn't be my first choice as Gordon, but he brings many of the right qualities and does his best, holding his own with both Richardson and Olivier. Robert Ardrey's script makes both Gordon and the Mahdi (Laurence Olivier, superb) intelligent and at least partly sympathetic characters. A strong supporting cast, capable direction by Basil Dearden, and great second-unit work by Yakima Canutt.

 

Far less succesful was 2014's The Trip to Italy. Two actors or TV personalities I'd never heard of go to Italy. Gorgeous scenery, mouth-watering shots of food, and lots of references to the Italian travels of Byron and Shelley. That's the plus side.

 

Steve Coogan fades into the background. Rob Brydon is the dominant one, or at least the one who rarely shuts up. The funniest bit comes early as Brydon trashes The Dark Knight Rises, imitating an assistant director trying to cope with Christian Bale's mumbling and Tom Hardy's utter incomprehensibility. Brydon fances himself--perhaps I should just stop there--an impressionist. He does a very good Michael Caine and Hugh Grant, a lousy Gore Vidal, a Richard Burton that's only halfway there. As the film went on, I came to detest Brydon--actor or character, whichever: I just wanted him to go away. All in all, the film was like an "I went to Italy and all I got was this lousy Godfather impersonation" T-shirt.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

One movie that might fit both categories here was Cass Timberlane.   This was a very well made MGM romantic drama.   Tracy and Turner were very good in it as were all of the actors.    While one could say the casting of Zachary Scott was perfect but it also gave away the story.    e.g. early on in the film my wife asked me 'is he going to make a play for his close friend's wife?'.    I said,  'yea, I'm sure this will happen soon because Scott almost always plays that type of guy!'.      Sure enough.

 

The story sure wasn't kind to well off women.   Did the author Sinclair Lewis have some type of personal confict with those type of women?    Mary Astor, in a small part, was great as the leading she-dog.     

 

My favorite was The Battle of Algiers.   Wow, what a movie.    I didn't know until after the movie was over that NO acutal footage was used.  Everyone was acting.   It looked so real to me.   So real.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

i watched 'the steel trap'; this time from start to finish.

loved the flick; it was pleasingly suspenseful; but not the 'nail biting' type.

joseph cotten's character (nervous and intense throughout) i found rather funny.

i do not care too much for cotten, but he was a TERRIFIC actor.

and theresa wright looked ABSOLUTELY stunning as a blonde (a rarity with most actresses who try that style); it's probably why i did not recognize her when i first caught this movie a coupla years ago.

highly recommended.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously the poor man's Rudolph Valentino, Rod La Rocque is unwatchable today. Blech.

 

Fun fact, he worked with/kissed Pola Negri and was married to Vilma Banky, two of my father's favorite actors.

 

At least, unlike the poor Ross Alexander who was very good yesterday (some excellent classically classic movies, TCM still knows how to do it right from time to time) and stupidly committed suicide, Rod lived a fairly long time.

 

Yesterday's movie was Maybe It's Love and in addition to the excellent Alexander, Joseph Cawthorn did some excellent Jewish schtick.

 

Missed it, did you all? Your loss. All about the poor Ross Alexander:

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0018717/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Khartoum was better than I remembered and would definitely make my top 10 list for 1966. Line after line could have come from a contemporary movie. Charismatic Muslim leader wants to be acknowledged throughout the Muslim world and will kill all who oppose him. Western leader who has no imperialist ambitions and will do as little as possible to oppose him, frustrating the designs of some of his advisers. This didn't resonate in 1966, but it certainly does now. Exemplary cinematography by Edward Scaife

 

 

I agree with this statement.  The movie was much better than my faded memory remembers.  Definitely resonates today.  My 25 year old son watched it with me grudgingly and had to admit he enjoyed the movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

'he knew women' (1930).

 

it aired monday, 10/20.

 

i could not wait until that fricking movie ended.

 

i cherish flicks from the 1930's and all but, i should've known that sometimes when very old flicks are made and casted full of 'nobodies' they tend to reek to high heaven.

 

this one certainly did.

 

the plot was good; but the actors and acting were just awful.

 

but especially irritating was that lowell sherman dood.

 

his make-up job was so effeminate, it was nauseating.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...