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LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


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Fascinating when a proven favorite is a yawn, and another not so favorite favorite is enjoyable.

 

Yesterday's birthday tribute to Constance Bennett was enjoyable overall, but some of the individual movies were astonishing bad.

 

Proving, once again, that it's not just the black and white, it's not just the actors, but the black and white movie with the wonderful actors must be written well.

 

I turned off most of them, but Our Betters with Gilbert Roland was interesting. Two Faced Woman with Melvyn Douglas, whom I've enjoyed in the past, and Greta Garbo, who looked like an old shoe, was excruciating. Similarly, Smart Woman with an old CB was sad. The rest were unwatchable.

 

Interestingly, After Office Hours was a delight, and sadly I missed the first 15 minutes. I usually bypass Gable, but in this movie he was suitably paired with CB. His antics on the motorcycle were almost Cary Grant-ish. That car, that beach house, all nice to look at whilst Gable and CB, of course, saved the day, however improbably. Stu Erwin, also usually unbearable, added to the mix. Maltin didn't like it, no surprise. Oh, and the script was written by Ben's grandfather Herman.

 

Too bad Gable believed his PR and later became only Gable on the screen, the man had real talent.

 

TCM has showed Hot Saturday more than once recently, I wouldn't mind seeing After Office Hours again.

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Thanks everyone for contributing to this thread- it helps steer me towards some gems and avoid wasting my time with others. I especially like when you describe what you liked or didn't like about the movie.

 

I watched CONTEMPT and found the charactors rather callous. It was hard for me to care about what happens to them. Does the shot of a naked Bardot back side count as "best opening of a movie"?

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Tiki, I agree with you regarding the appreciation of this thread.  I get good ideas from it as well and I also like to see people watching films I love and liking them as well. 

 

Right now, I am unfortunately unable to watch TCM, as I have Dish and have lost the channel, along with my other favorite-- Cartoon Network.  Now how am I going to watch 'King of the Hill' ? Hopefully Turner and Dish come to some sort of agreement soon.  For now I have my beloved NFL RedZone to watch on Sundays and right now I'm binging on The Mary Tyler Moore Show

 

Anyway,

 

Despite suddenly being cut off from TCM, I have been able to catch up on some films that were on my DVR.

 

Mara Maru.  I recorded this because it had my Errol.  Although, I'll admit that I was a little apprehensive to watch it seeing that it was made in 1952 and I know Errol wasn't in the best shape and looked worse for the wear.  Although, I didn't think he looked that bad in Against All Flags from the same year; so I had some hope.  After all I can't expect 43 year old Errol Flynn to look the same as 25 year old Errol Flynn right?  Anyway... in Mara Maru, Flynn, while definitely looking older and a bit heavier, didn't look that bad.  The film was interesting.  I liked seeing Flynn as a treasure hunter.  It was fun seeing the old scuba diving costumes.  The overall film was interesting, definitely not one of Flynn's best, but not bad.  Like Ben Mankiewicz said in the intro: A lesser Errol Flynn film is still worth watching because of Errol Flynn (he said something to that effect).  

 

Panama Lady.  I recorded this film because it had Lucille Ball.  Definitely not one of her best; but it wasn't bad.  I liked the noir aspects of it.  The most interesting thing about this film was the casting of Allan Lane as Ball's co-star.  Lane is better known as the voice of Mr. Ed.  I loved Mr. Ed when I was little.  Lane's voice didn't exactly sound like Mr. Ed's in this film.  I'm sure part of that can be attributed to age (this was about 20 years prior to the television show); but Lane could have also used a different voice for his equine role. 

 

Double Harness.  I am a big fan of William Powell and recorded this during the Pre-Code marathon.  I was not familiar with Ann Harding, so this was my first introduction to her.  I thought the film was fine-- definitely not one of the best of Powell's that I've seen.  Harding was good, I'd be interested in seeing her in a better film.  Although, Harding looked kind of matronly in this film.  I don't know if that's just how she was or whether or not this was the fault of the costume and makeup department. 

 

Murder My Sweet.  This film was excellent.  I love film noir and I thought Dick Powell was great as Phillip Marlowe.  I am not too familiar with a lot of his work except for The Bad and the Beautiful and Meet the People with Lucille Ball.  I also enjoyed Claire Trevor and Anne Shirley's performances.  I loved this film so much, that I want to read Raymond Chandler's original book, Farewell My Lovely.  Chandler's original title was originally the name of the film; but audiences at first, stayed away thinking that it was another Powell musical.  The studio then changed the title to the 'Murder' title and the box office receipts went through the roof.

 

Hopefully I'll get TCM back soon so I can continue to discover more films.  For now, I'll have to continue binge-watching 'Mary Tyler Moore' (there's 7 seasons to get through!) and relying on Netflix (My current selection is The Dark Corner). 

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Tiki, I agree with you regarding the appreciation of this thread.  I get good ideas from it as well and I also like to see people watching films I love and liking them as well. 

 

Right now, I am unfortunately unable to watch TCM, as I have Dish and have lost the channel, along with my other favorite-- Cartoon Network.  Now how am I going to watch 'King of the Hill' ? Hopefully Turner and Dish come to some sort of agreement soon.  For now I have my beloved NFL RedZone to watch on Sundays and right now I'm binging on The Mary Tyler Moore Show

 

Anyway,

 

Despite suddenly being cut off from TCM, I have been able to catch up on some films that were on my DVR.

 

Mara Maru.  I recorded this because it had my Errol.  Although, I'll admit that I was a little apprehensive to watch it seeing that it was made in 1952 and I know Errol wasn't in the best shape and looked worse for the wear.  Although, I didn't think he looked that bad in Against All Flags from the same year; so I had some hope.  After all I can't expect 43 year old Errol Flynn to look the same as 25 year old Errol Flynn right?  Anyway... in Mara Maru, Flynn, while definitely looking older and a bit heavier, didn't look that bad.  The film was interesting.  I liked seeing Flynn as a treasure hunter.  It was fun seeing the old scuba diving costumes.  The overall film was interesting, definitely not one of Flynn's best, but not bad.  Like Ben Mankiewicz said in the intro: A lesser Errol Flynn film is still worth watching because of Errol Flynn (he said something to that effect).  

 

Panama Lady.  I recorded this film because it had Lucille Ball.  Definitely not one of her best; but it wasn't bad.  I liked the noir aspects of it.  The most interesting thing about this film was the casting of Allan Lane as Ball's co-star.  Lane is better known as the voice of Mr. Ed.  I loved Mr. Ed when I was little.  Lane's voice didn't exactly sound like Mr. Ed's in this film.  I'm sure part of that can be attributed to age (this was about 20 years prior to the television show); but Lane could have also used a different voice for his equine role. 

 

Double Harness.  I am a big fan of William Powell and recorded this during the Pre-Code marathon.  I was not familiar with Ann Harding, so this was my first introduction to her.  I thought the film was fine-- definitely not one of the best of Powell's that I've seen.  Harding was good, I'd be interested in seeing her in a better film.  Although, Harding looked kind of matronly in this film.  I don't know if that's just how she was or whether or not this was the fault of the costume and makeup department. 

 

Murder My Sweet.  This film was excellent.  I love film noir and I thought Dick Powell was great as Phillip Marlowe.  I am not too familiar with a lot of his work except for The Bad and the Beautiful and Meet the People with Lucille Ball.  I also enjoyed Claire Trevor and Anne Shirley's performances.  I loved this film so much, that I want to read Raymond Chandler's original book, Farewell My Lovely.  Chandler's original title was originally the name of the film; but audiences at first, stayed away thinking that it was another Powell musical.  The studio then changed the title to the 'Murder' title and the box office receipts went through the roof.

 

Hopefully I'll get TCM back soon so I can continue to discover more films.  For now, I'll have to continue binge-watching 'Mary Tyler Moore' (there's 7 seasons to get through!) and relying on Netflix (My current selection is The Dark Corner). 

 

Related to "Although, Harding looked kind of matronly in this film.  I don't know if that's just how she was or whether or not this was the fault of the costume and makeup department". 

 

In many films Harding's natural good looks were hidden and she does come off as matronly.    e.g. the way her hair is styled.  She looks great in photos where her hair is down and natural looking but that type of style wasn't vogue until the 40s.  

 

Still a very fine actress but one I didn't really know much about until a few years ago.    I recommend you check out the movies she has done with Leslie Howard. 

 

As for The Dark Corner:  This noir will be a treat.    Made after Laura,  Clifton Webb gives another fine performance.

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I've seen seven movies in the last two weeks, five this week and two the week before.  Valeria and the Sea of Wonders is not a bad film, nor is it my favorite example of the Czech new Wave.  I suppose the post invasion censors looked at it and suspected that while it probably wasn't too fond of the Novotny/Brezhnev style of rule, its criticisms were so obscure that they could get an undeserved reputation for liberalism by allowing its release.  The Temptress has some interesting aspects, though Greta Garbo is surprising passive as the title character.  I wish i had payed Kean more attention while it was on.  The Fog struck me as uninteresting as most of John Carpenter's movies.  Saboteur is not the most profound of Hitchcock's movies, and Robert Cummings is definitely no Cary Grant nor Robert Donat.  But it's actually fairly exciting and well paced.  Ice is an interesting 1969 movie about people plotting a Socialist revolution in the United States.  At the same time it seemed possibly prophetic, now the concept appears like science fiction.  The Forsaken Land is a not entirely successful Sri Lankan movie that touches and alludes to the country's violent struggle with Tamil separatists.  Somewhat opaque and still, it certainly has more sex and nudity than most movie from the Indian sub-continent.

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Thanks everyone for contributing to this thread- it helps steer me towards some gems and avoid wasting my time with others. I especially like when you describe what you liked or didn't like about the movie.

 

I watched CONTEMPT and found the charactors rather callous. It was hard for me to care about what happens to them. Does the shot of a naked Bardot back side count as "best opening of a movie"?

 

I don't think "callous" is the right word, and in fact the movie is one of the most subtle and intelligent depictions of a collapsing marriage.  This essay should help explain matters:  http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/240-contempt-the-story-of-a-marriage

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I saw three movies last week.  If The Southerner isn't as good as Renoir's greatest movies, and if it is not the most perceptive and honest look at smallholder/sharecropper life, it is manifestly better than most American movies on the subject.  House of Wax has some interesting touches.  One does wonder what would have happened if a really good director had found some way of making Vincent Price giving a good performance, instead of having him start as reasonably sane and civil and ending the movie as a complete lunatic.  Where the Truth Lies starts interestingly and then becomes a complete mess.  (Seriously what kind of journalist sleeps with both her subjects?  And the denouement instead of being clever just seems contrived.

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I saw three movies last week.  If The Southerner isn't as good as Renoir's greatest movies, and if it is not the most perceptive and honest look at smallholder/sharecropper life, it is manifestly better than most American movies on the subject.  House of Wax has some interesting touches.  One does wonder what would have happened if a really good director had found some way of making Vincent Price giving a good performance, instead of having him start as reasonably sane and civil and ending the movie as a complete lunatic.  Where the Truth Lies starts interestingly and then becomes a complete mess.  (Seriously what kind of journalist sleeps with both her subjects?  And the denouement instead of being clever just seems contrived.

 

With regards to House of Wax;   Having the Price's character use those that harmed and hurt him as 'models' for the wax figures was understandable (well in its way) but once he wanted to harm innocent people it was a little too much.   Caroline Jones was funny in this film.   I wasn't sure it was her but when I saw the wax figure I knew it was for sure since the wax figure with the dark hair wig looked like the Adam Family character.

 

(also saw her in The Big Heat last night;  I really like her more with dark hair then as a blonde).

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I saw four movies last week.  The Wildcat was clearly the best, with striking art direction and mise-en-scene, along with strikingly good cinematography for 1921 and a clever sense of action.  Sadie Thompson certainly benefits from Gloria Swanson's charisma.  The Silence of the Sea was also a good debut and a thoughtful movie, even if it involves mentioning Treblinka a year before it was founded.  Less successful was Lower City, a Brazillian movie with more nudity than insight about its petty criminal characters.  Mr. Freedom is a somewhat crude satire of American chauvinism, notwithstanding the presence of Delphine Seyrig, while Donald Pleasance has a cameo.

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I saw six movies last week.  Man is not a Bird and Love Affair have their interesting aspects, but they didn't really grab my attention.  I suppose the second movie deserves more of a look.  The Conquest of the Air is an interesting documentary.  The Winning of Barbara Worth has some problems, such as an annoying organ score and large portions filmed in unpleasant orange.  I know black and white is no more real than any other non-colour scheme, but it feels more real, while the way that many Hollywood silent movies don't use black and white but something else is off putting.  Having said that Winning does become more interesting if you look at it more closely.  Admittedly the love story is nothing special and the conflicts are simply black and white on unlovely orange.  But the scenes are interesting.  Maps to the Stars is clearly the movie of the week, an intriguing portrait of perversity in contemporary Hollywood.  U-Carmen is a movie which updates Carmen to contemporary South Africa, with the characters singing Bizet for much of the movie and speaking Xhosa for the rest.  It's not bad, but also nothing special.

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I saw 5 notable movies last week too-all inspired by this board:

 

THE WICKER MAN- Great suspenseful story set in Scotland. A slow burn type of mystery. Highlight was Christopher Lee in a dress & Chuck Taylors. Oh and nudity including gorgeoso Britt Eklund. If you like Planet of The Apes, you'd like this one.

 

MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS- Needed to see this one again-much better second time around. Just as beautifully shot as KANE, same ominous music though. Great story well told.

 

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO GARP- Had to revisit Robin Williams' early film. Great story well told. One of those movies anyone can enjoy. John Irving was the Woody Allen of writers-quirky.

 

THE INNOCENTS- Just couldn't get through this one. Will try again later.

 

THE DARK CORNER-Despite my love for Lucy, the story was predictable. Didn't really care about the charactors or situations. I'm finding film noir leaves me cold unless it contains a very strong personality like Mitchum.

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I saw 5 notable movies last week too-all inspired by this board:

 

THE WICKER MAN- Great suspenseful story set in Scotland. A slow burn type of mystery. Highlight was Christopher Lee in a dress & Chuck Taylors. Oh and nudity including gorgeoso Britt Eklund. If you like Planet of The Apes, you'd like this one.

 

MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS- Needed to see this one again-much better second time around. Just as beautifully shot as KANE, same ominous music though. Great story well told.

 

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO GARP- Had to revisit Robin Williams' early film. Great story well told. One of those movies anyone can enjoy. John Irving was the Woody Allen of writers-quirky.

 

THE INNOCENTS- Just couldn't get through this one. Will try again later.

 

THE DARK CORNER-Despite my love for Lucy, the story was predictable. Didn't really care about the charactors or situations. I'm finding film noir leaves me cold unless it contains a very strong personality like Mitchum.

 

While I enjoyed The Dark Corner because it is very true to the noir vision,   Mark Stevens doesn't have enough of an 'it' factor to carry the film.   Of course I'm pre-conditioned on actors like Mitchum, Andrews,  Bogart, and Ryan as the lead in a noir. 

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While I enjoyed The Dark Corner because it is very true to the noir vision,   Mark Stevens doesn't have enough of an 'it' factor to carry the film.   Of course I'm pre-conditioned on actors like Mitchum, Andrews,  Bogart, and Ryan as the lead in a noir.

When I watched The Dark Corner, while I enjoyed the film very much, agree that Stevens wasn't enough of a personality to be the main character.  For me, it almost seemed like Stevens was doing an impression of a typical male noir character.  I don't know if that makes sense.  I just didn't think Stevens sounded natural.  Aside from him though, I really liked the performances by Lucy, William Bendix and Clifton Webb.  They're what made the film for me.  I love film noir though, so maybe I'm "easy" when it comes to weaknesses in a noir film.

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Interesting day, the kind TCM used to have in the past.

 

So Long Letty - wife swapping and a helluva female character actor, new to me, and the film is from................1929! Just imagine if the wankers who instituted the puerile movie code instead fell off a cliff.

 

Was Charlotte Greenwood the woman in W.C. Fields' dentist chair, anyone know?

 

What fun that Broadway play must have been, with Greenwood in the lead.

 

The next two look good, as well. Thanks, TCM.

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Interesting day, the kind TCM used to have in the past.

 

So Long Letty - wife swapping and a helluva female character actor, new to me, and the film is from................1929! Just imagine if the wankers who instituted the puerile movie code instead fell off a cliff.

 

Was Charlotte Greenwood the woman in W.C. Fields' dentist chair, anyone know?

 

What fun that Broadway play must have been, with Greenwood in the lead.

 

The next two look good, as well. Thanks, TCM.

Oh well, the movie with Olsen and Johnson is idiotic. Hope the next one with Richard Barthelmess is better. Shame it's always hit or miss with TCM.

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Oh well, the movie with Olsen and Johnson is idiotic. Hope the next one with Richard Barthelmess is better. Shame it's always hit or miss with TCM.

Sad. All clunkers after So Long Letty.

 

Interesting reuse of the Kirby's gorgeous car from Topper in today's not very good Jack Oakie movie, Super Sleuth.

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Interesting day, the kind TCM used to have in the past.

 

So Long Letty - wife swapping and a helluva female character actor, new to me, and the film is from................1929! Just imagine if the wankers who instituted the puerile movie code instead fell off a cliff.

 

Was Charlotte Greenwood the woman in W.C. Fields' dentist chair, anyone know?

 

What fun that Broadway play must have been, with Greenwood in the lead.

 

The next two look good, as well. Thanks, TCM.

Thanks, roverrocks. Usually, I'm talking to myself on this thread. NOT that I have a problem with that! :lol:

 

I forgot another eyeopening moment in So Long Letty - one of the characters let drop the word 'pregnant'! Imagine that the audience of 1929 was adult enough to hear this, but Hays and his fellow puerile small minded w-a-n-k-e-r idiots decided the audience of 1934 was too innocent to hear this word? Even I Love Lucy couldn't use the word.

 

Amazing.

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Although leggy like Greenwood, her name is not in the credits of THE DENTIST (1932)

 

Primos- have you ever seen the Warren William film OUTCAST (1937)?

My film group just screened this a few weeks ago and I thought it was his best leading role (I'm a WW fan too) The audience was glued to the screen and audibly erupted in horror (spoiler!) when the mother pulled out her son's breathing tube. It was the highlight of our film season this far.

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I saw four movies last week.  The Last Command has its virtues.  Emil Jannings gives a good performance, and William Powell in his comparatively small role shows signs of future greatness.  On the other hand, the portrait of the Russian Revolution is somewhat muddled.  (At one point, Jannings' character complains about revolutionaries cutting off military supplies, as if they were like the resistance in the second world war.  And it's not clear why Powell's character is sympathetic to Jannings.)  Scarecrow is a more interesting movie, and it's nice to see Pacino before he became typecast.  A time for Dying is a Boetticher western, and its terse, abrupt ending helps make up for a weak middle third of apparent western cliches.  Kikirou and the Wild Beasts is an adequate, but hardly brilliant animated movie apparently based on African folk tales.

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Lo and behold, I actually enjoyed an intro from Ben, for THEM!. He even made me smile, something RO has not done since day one.

 

Hey TCM, time to feature Ben more often. The guy has really, really improved.

 

Where was Leonard Nimoy in Them!? Was he the cop in the station, before they went out to the desert? I saw Fess Parker, but wasn't sure which one was Leonard Nimoy.

 

Hoo boy, Edmund Gwenn was an annoying actor. I can't believe he was perfect for Miracle on 34th Street.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm on a posting bonanza today. 

 

I've watched quite a few movies recently:

 

BIG HERO 6- I saw this movie earlier this week.  It was a collaboration between Disney and Pixar.  It was excellent.  Great storyline, good characters and it was just overall fun.  It made it even better that myself, my husband and my sister were the only ones in the entire theater.  No crying children to ruin the experience. 

 

DON'T BET ON BLONDES- I'll admit, the only reason I DVR'd this was to see my beloved Errol before he was a star.  It was odd not seeing his name in a large font above the title.  He was on the page listing all the other character actors.  Just a name on a list.  He was gorgeous per usual.  I also got to see PrimosPrimos' Warren William in action.  After looking him up in imdb, I found out that I had seen him in another movie-- Gold Diggers of 1933.  I'll let Primos have William, I'll take Errol.  He was good though, I look forward to seeing him in more films.  On the whole though, this film wasn't much and is really only noteworthy because of the appearance by Flynn.

 

THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING- I recorded this for Edward G. Robinson and Jean Arthur.  I really liked this film.  While the plot is one I'd seen before (man bears striking resemblance to criminal and is mistaken for said criminal) the film was good and I liked the pairing of Robinson and Arthur.  I know that there are some who are annoyed by Arthur; but I like her. 

 

ROBIN AND MARIAN- The concept was interesting.  It was supposed to take place 20 years after the Robin Hood tale typically ends (with Robin and Marian meeting/reuniting and marrying/getting engaged by the end of the film).  By this point, Robin Hood is off fighting in The Crusades and Marian has joined a convent.  The characters were all there: Robin Hood, Marian, Little John, King Richard, Will Scarlett; but I don't know, the film just didn't do anything for me.  I don't know why.  I thought it was interesting that Marian joined a convent and was a nun, yet completely abandoned that when Robin Hood showed up again.  The end was depressing.  Definitely not my favorite version of the Robin Hood story, even though I liked stars Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn.

 

MARNIE- This was an interesting Hitchcock film.  It was Tippi Hedren's second collaboration with Hitch.  While I prefer The Birds, I really liked this film.  The only part I didn't care for was the scene that implied that Connery was going to force Hedren to consummate their marriage even though she had a deep-seated mistrust of men.  I liked Hitch's blond being a criminal and I found the storyline interesting.  It was very intense.  The ending was sad; but effectively cleared up why Hedren's character had all her fears and ultimately made her character more sympathetic.

 

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I saw four movies last week, and one the week before.  Ghosts was perhaps the best, a German film about two female juvenile delinquents. It was a subtle, reasonably simple film.  The Army was also worth watching, about old men inflicting their disappointments on the next generation, engaging in fatuous militaristic talk.  Humoresque is not the kind of movie I thought I might like, and you do have to have a tolerance for melodrama, as well as for Odets' screenplays.  But if you can get past these, you can find something to enjoy.  Through a Glass Darkly is the first of Bergman's "God's Silence" trilogy.  One can understand why it won an oscar.  It discusses a serious topic, the acting is extremely good, and it discusses it with more taste and restraint than half a dozen movies based on Tennessee Williams plays.  But the later two plays are more challenging, both intellectually and aesthetically, and Bjornstrand's final comments are arguably a cop out.  Crossing a Bridge is an interesting documentary about Istanbul's music scene:  among other things Istanbul has a vibrant rap scene.

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I saw several movies last week.  Separate Tables is the sort of movie that the oscars liked to honor in the fifties that stands as a monument to its seriously poor judgement.  Essentially the trick to winning oscars since 1939 is to make serious movies that can't possibly offend anyone.  As such the movie is contrived (Niven and Kerr are much better in Bonjour Tristesse, which came out the same year).  Lancaster, as is often the case, does his best, but he and Hayworth are not a convincing couple and it is sentimental to suggest otherwise.  Partly because it is slightly confusing, and partly because I didn't devote my full attention to the first half hour, The Law of the Border was a bit difficult to follow.  Since the police officer seems to embody the Turkish state's conception of it itself as modern, humane and progressive one might wonder why the army sought to destroy it after the 1980 coup.  It's interesting, but the earlier movie in the World Cinema project from South Korea, The Housemaid, is more successful, as well as several examples of Brazillian novo cinema.  Birdman may win Michael Keaton an oscar, and one can appreciate why one would find the virtuoso long takes enjoyable.  On the other hand, it seems like a parody of itself:  long ago blockbuster star Michael Keaton stars in an independent (but not too independent) movie about a long faded blockbuster star trying to find aesthetic redemption in a Broadway production of Raymond Carver.  I'm inclined to agree with Richard Brody that the style hides the conventionality of the movie.  The Sure Thing isn't a bad movie.  Indeed if I had seen it at the time it came out instead of nearly three decades later I might even have been deeply moved instead of just mildly amused by it.  Susan Slept Here is another Tashlin movie that doesn't work for it.  Powell and Reynolds are not a good couple.  Even granted that Reynolds is more than 17, Powell is nearly 50, not 35 as the movie suggests, and the results are not pleasant.  The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada does not start well, but it does improve as the scrambled chronology gels into the story proper, the characters become clearer, and Tommy Lee Jones' character makes some mistakes.  So the real movie of the week is Le Petit Theatre de Jean Renoir.  If not his most profound movie, it is still charming and worth seeing, and it's nice that he went out on a high point.

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Dollar short and over 365 days late, but I just saw Nebraska.

 

Outstanding movie, Dern and Squibb were amazing.

 

Oh, and btw, the dolts at imdb thought the scene where Forte (proving himself to be a very good actor) clocked Keach was uncalled for. Uncalled for, can you IMAGINE?

 

Best scene of the movie.

 

So, what did you all think of Nebraska?

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Skkimpole, I'm with you all the way on the relative merits of Separate Tables and Bonjour Tristesse. I tend to believe that the 1950s was the decade where the official taste, as represented by the Oscars, is furthest from our (or at least my) preferences today. Earlier this year, when we were doing polls of our favorite Oscar-nominated films from the 30s and 40s, I had no problem finding a top 20. Granted, there were 10 nominees for some of those years. Of the fifty 1950s best picture nominees, I could only find eight that I strongly like--three of those were directed by Fred Zinnemann--and another group that I like, but wouldn't consider favorites.

 

Movies recently viewed, not including my spousal unit's watching Home Alone and National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation. Road to Utopia was very funny, with even a couple of off-color jokes, as some of you noted in another thread. Bob Hope knows how to sell even the lamest jokes. Through a Glass Darkly has superb cinematography by Sven Nykvist, some imaginative direction by Ingmar Bergman, and a very strong cast. The script is not quite up to their efforts. The Eternal Return matches a great Jean Cocteau script with equally strong direction by Jean Delannoy and a fine cast. This updated re-telling of the Tristan and Isolde story shouldn't work, but it does. Not available on DVD; I saw it on a VHS tape. This was the best of the week.

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