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LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


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I saw several movies last week.  Separate Tables is the sort of movie that the oscars liked to honor in the fifties that stands as a monument to its seriously poor judgement.  Essentially the trick to winning oscars since 1939 is to make serious movies that can't possibly offend anyone.  As such the movie is contrived (Niven and Kerr are much better in Bonjour Tristesse, which came out the same year).  Lancaster, as is often the case, does his best, but he and Hayworth are not a convincing couple and it is sentimental to suggest otherwise.  Partly because it is slightly confusing, and partly because I didn't devote my full attention to the first half hour, The Law of the Border was a bit difficult to follow.  Since the police officer seems to embody the Turkish state's conception of it itself as modern, humane and progressive one might wonder why the army sought to destroy it after the 1980 coup.  It's interesting, but the earlier movie in the World Cinema project from South Korea, The Housemaid, is more successful, as well as several examples of Brazillian novo cinema.  Birdman may win Michael Keaton an oscar, and one can appreciate why one would find the virtuoso long takes enjoyable.  On the other hand, it seems like a parody of itself:  long ago blockbuster star Michael Keaton stars in an independent (but not too independent) movie about a long faded blockbuster star trying to find aesthetic redemption in a Broadway production of Raymond Carver.  I'm inclined to agree with Richard Brody that the style hides the conventionality of the movie.  The Sure Thing isn't a bad movie.  Indeed if I had seen it at the time it came out instead of nearly three decades later I might even have been deeply moved instead of just mildly amused by it.  Susan Slept Here is another Tashlin movie that doesn't work for it.  Powell and Reynolds are not a good couple.  Even granted that Reynolds is more than 17, Powell is nearly 50, not 35 as the movie suggests, and the results are not pleasant.  The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada does not start well, but it does improve as the scrambled chronology gels into the story proper, the characters become clearer, and Tommy Lee Jones' character makes some mistakes.  So the real movie of the week is Le Petit Theatre de Jean Renoir.  If not his most profound movie, it is still charming and worth seeing, and it's nice that he went out on a high point.

Did you see Nebraska?

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I was all over the map last week...

 

DON KNOTTS RELUCTANT HERO COLLECTION

I'm reading his autobiography and wanted to revisit his work. Loved the nostalgia factor of GHOST & MR CHICKEN, with Knotts playing to perfection his charactor "the nervous man". Loved the Vic Mizzy musical score, plethora of great charactor actors like Reta Shaw, all in a fun story. A kid's movie adults can enjoy too.

I watched THE LOVE GOD which was mildly amusing. Adorable Anne Francis co stars and featuring eclectic 60's costuming. Fun! I got tired watching THE SHAKIES GUN IN THE WEST and took it back to the library. Better in small doses.

 

NEW YORK STORIES and SMALL TIME CROOKS

Trying to see every Woody Allen I've missed when I was discouraged by his social life. I enjoyed the Scorcese segment a lot. I loved the last segment a lot too-mainly because of Julie Kavner & Mae Questel being in it. Cute story with top notch performances. Fell asleep through 2nd feature. Must have been boring.

 

THE DEAD MAN

Mr Teek showed me this last night. Upon hearing the first 2 bars of music I said "sounds like Neil Young" which it was. Jim Jarmush movie, he's an odd director. Seemed like he was trying to be "artsy" which is better than being bland, I guess. Thin story, but interesting charactors especially NOBODY the Indian. Johnny Depp is a good actor, just too girly looking. Kind of like weirdo Tom Cruise-his looks get in the way of my believing him. It was ok with Cary Grant, but not with Depp.

 

THE SUN ALSO RISES

Wanted to see this after discussions about Errol here. I found it funny when an actor said "The most beautiful woman I've ever seen!" when Ava Gardner walked into the room. She was far from her most stunning self, sadly. I didn't mind Errol being older at all, his charm still came through for me. Wonderful to see a very young Robert Evans, of Evan-Picone and later successful studio head.

 

(Woo hoo! Tonight my movie buddy gives me a bunch of TCM recordings from Nov-Dec!)

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I was all over the map last week...

 

DON KNOTTS RELUCTANT HERO COLLECTION

I'm reading his autobiography and wanted to revisit his work. Loved the nostalgia factor of GHOST & MR CHICKEN, with Knotts playing to perfection his charactor "the nervous man". Loved the Vic Mizzy musical score, plethora of great charactor actors like Reta Shaw, all in a fun story. A kid's movie adults can enjoy too.

I watched THE LOVE GOD which was mildly amusing. Adorable Anne Francis co stars and featuring eclectic 60's costuming. Fun! I got tired watching THE SHAKIES GUN IN THE WEST and took it back to the library. Better in small doses.

 

THE SUN ALSO RISES

Wanted to see this after discussions about Errol here. I found it funny when an actor said "The most beautiful woman I've ever seen!" when Ava Gardner walked into the room. She was far from her most stunning self, sadly. I didn't mind Errol being older at all, his charm still came through for me. Wonderful to see a very young Robert Evans, of Evan-Picone and later successful studio head.

 

(Woo hoo! Tonight my movie buddy gives me a bunch of TCM recordings from Nov-Dec!)

I picked up this same Don Knotts collection a few months ago.  I haven't watched it yet though.  I'm looking forward to it.  Don Knotts is hilarious.  I loved him in The Andy Griffith Show and Three's Company

 

Re: The Sun Also Rises.  I have wanted to see this, but have been hesistant, because I've heard how much older and haggard "my Errol" looked and I'm afraid that it'll be true.  Although I've heard the same about his early 1950s films and I was pleasantly surprised to see that he didn't look that bad, just older.  I don't expect him to look the same in a 1958 movie as he did in 1935's Captain Blood of course.  I guess I shouldn't be so shallow, but that's the truth as to why I haven't watched this film yet.

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There was nothing on that interested me on Christmas Eve/Day (12:00am) so I watched on Pay-per-view "Left Behind" (2014) starring Nicolas Cage.  It was was good but not excellent.  It took too long for the "event" to happen and there should had been extra time given for what was to come.  Movie is a bit surreal and like the actor Chad Michael Murray.

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I saw four movies over the last two weeks.  The Babadook is an above horror movie.  Its subtext is the tensions between a widowed mother and her young, highly-strung son.  Ultimately, the movie is not successful in resolving them, but the attempt is interesting.  The Reluctant Dragon is less successful, and not simply because it's basically an ad for Disney studios.  The three animated sequences all have their flaws.  I'm not a Goofy fan, while the "Baby Weems" segment, which starts out with the interesting idea of being a series of storyboards, is flawed by its casual racism.  As for the title sequence, the title character can only be described, to put it bluntly, as a flaming queen.  I suppose it's the movie's obscurity that meant this wasn't recognized earlier.  Claire Denis is an interesting, often successful director, but my first impression about her "vampire" movie Trouble Every Day is that it's more opaque and esoteric than strictly necessary.  By contrast, The Legend of the Princess Kaguya is not only the best movie of 2013, but a work of considerable charm and beauty.  It's by the same director of The Grave of the Fireflies but in a very different style.

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I saw five movies last week, all disappointing I'm afraid.  Big Eyes suffers from a performance by Christoph Waltz so broad and cartoonish that it makes Amy Adams look like an idiot for ever believing it.  Doubt , the last movie I saw in 2014, is less a serious drama than someone's idea of an Oscarbait movie.  It hard to take someone as a serious exemplar of moral conservatism when she's upset with ballpoint pens.  Room Service does not have a reputation as a good Marx Brothers movie.  The reputation is well deserved, the first half is absolutely deadly.  The second half is not as remotely as good as other Marx Brothers movies, but it's more tolerable.  Bells are ringing may be the least interesting musical Minnelli ever made.  Somewhere has an interesting cinematic style, like Sofia Coppola's other movies, and there is some human interest in the story of lifestyles of the rich and utterly fatuous.  I just don't think it's enough.

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I haven't been able to watch as many movies as usual, because my husband and I are knee deep in house hunting.  Fun but frustrating at the same time.

 

Anyway... I managed to fit in a few films:

 

BELLS ARE RINGING- Not only did I get to hear what Judy Holliday's real voice sounded like, I also got to hear Jean Stapleton's as well.  Very interesting.  It's amazing how Holliday created such a different voice for her Billie Dawn character in Born Yesterday.  I really like Judy in this film, she's a great singer.  Dean Martin co-stars and he's excellent as well.  I liked the premise of the movie, very interesting.  Judy works for an answering service and frequently passes on tidbits of information to other clients when she thinks she can help.  She ends up falling in love with Dean Martin, one her clients, even though she's never seen him.  I'm a fan of Vincente Minnelli and Comden and Green's screenplays.  This musical was a win-win for me.  It's a shame that Judy's life was cut short.   

 

BACHELOR MOTHER- While I can't say I'm a huge fan of Ginger Rogers, I think she's growing on me somewhat.  I like David Niven and I liked them in this film together.  This was a fun film and I especially enjoyed seeing the 1939 Donald Duck toys!

 

SWING TIME- Another Ginger Rogers film, but this time with Fred Astaire.  While I've said in the past that I'm more of a fan of Astaire solo (or with other partners) and not so much of the celebrated Astaire/Rogers combo, I have to say that I enjoyed this film.  Suffice it to say, I think Ginger Rogers is growing on me.  I also enjoyed her in Stage Door but that was because the film had multiple people I like (Katharine Hepburn, Lucille Ball and Ann Miller) and Rogers was funny.  Can I watch a film starring Ginger Rogers without there being a co-star that I like? Only time will tell.

 

EASY TO LOVE- I don't know why I watched this.  I'm not a fan of Esther Williams in the slightest.  She's too stiff when she's not in the water.  Even it being a musical didn't save it-- no dancing.  Synchronized swimming is not as interesting.  Honestly, my favorite part was when they showed a pair of dancers' legs.  One set of legs belonged to Cyd Charisse.  I did notice though that this film is the film that Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds watch in The Tender Trap which aired right before this film. 

 

CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT- I really liked this film. Barbara Stanwyck is amazing.  I love her in everything.  SZ Sakall is hilarious and I'm glad he pops up in so many films.

 

MY FAVORITE WIFE- While the film started out promising, Cary Grant and Irene Dunne, and it was generally amusing for the most part, I hated the ending.  It was terrible.  I think the Doris Day/James Garner remake, Move Over Darling was better.

 

GIMMIE SHELTER- This documentary about The Rolling Stones' ill-fated free concert in 1969 was very interesting.  While the Stones were fine, I found the 1969 audience fascinating.  It was such a different time and the crowd made for great viewing. 

 

THE OUT OF TOWNERS- I'm a big fan of Jack Lemmon.  I am undecided about Sandy Dennis.  I can't decide if I think she's funny or annoying.  I thought this movie was really good.  I liked the grittiness of the city against the ridiculousness of Lemmon and Dennis' situations.  Great film.

 

I have 20+ movies on my DVR to watch.  I hope I can see all of them (and of course, the others I'm going to record) before my husband and I find our house and I'll have to abandon them when we get our own DVR.

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Wow speedracer-you sure saw some CLASSICS.

Judy Holliday is one of my favorites. I'm convinced she created the quintessential dumb blonde in BORN YESTERDAY.

 

I've watched this week:

 

Saawariya-a Bollywood movie recommended by someone on this board. Typical B'wood with great costumes, sappy songs and moralistic story. When I saw the lead guy in a "naked towel dance" I realized I had seen this in the theater when it came out. Not a favorite, but ok.

 

HAROLD & MAUDE Criterion Collection- Got this out of the library for the "extras". Not worth the money to buy it, there's scant little insights by Cort & Ashby biographer. Worth one viewing of the supplements, though.

 

AMERICAN MASTERS MARGARET MITCHELL- Just including this excellent biography because it really talks a lot about the impact GWTW had-both the book & movie. (worth recording yourself a copy)

 

Adrien Brody in HOUDINI- I am a Houdini enthusiast so didn't have high hopes for this....but I love Adrien Brody (who has a house in my area) It was very obvious this was a TV product; the modern electronica music, the computer graphics illustrating what's going on inside his body, the fade out chapter endings, etc. It covers many facts of HH's life, but the crazy changes made to his personal life for dramatic effect are offensive! There is also that trendy fast flash cut thing from MTV used pretty frequently, making me dizzy. TikiKid responds to my continual scoffing with, "But it makes it more interesting to me!" So there you have it. All those camera affectations, swearing, sex scenes "sell" to the kids.

Happily, she's now interested in Houdini. She said, "He made MOVIES?" Yup and TikiSoo has them on DVD for your viewing play-sure. Only first the Tony Curtis version which I think has much better charactor development and more coherent story flow.

 

LILI- I wrote about my impressions on the "Lily" thread. Glad I finally saw it!

 

Still have THE AGE OF INNOCENCE to watch- another forum recommendation! Thanks!

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Last week I saw seven movies.  The remake of Total Recall was a perfectly pointless movie.  The original was hardly a good movie, but at least the director had a personality and had some cruel fun with Schwarzenegger's lack of one.  Life Itself was moderately interesting if, like Ebert's criticism itself, not very imaginative.  On Approval, by contrast, is one of the most amusing of British forties films.  And Criss-Cross is one of the most successful noirs.  The Idiot was also an interesting movie, and worth taking another look at.  The Mongols was a peculiar movie:  it's a seventies Iranian film about a director making a movie about a Mongol invasion.  I suspect it would be easier to appreciate if I saw it with English, and not French, subtitles.  Finally, there's The Bling Ring, another of Sofia Coppola's movies about the shallow and over-privileged.  At least Somewhere had a genuine relationship at it heart.  By contrast, it's not funny enough for satire, nor does it have any real special insight. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Over the last two weeks I saw five movies.  Regardless, Inherent Vice is well worth watching, even if I nodded off at a crucial point, and thus not realizing why Owen Wilson was in the movie.  Selma is also worth watching, even if it less than fair to LBJ who despite his many vices was arguably on his best behavior in the period being covered.  Jimmy P:  Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian is an interesting movie, if not as good as Arnuad Desplechin's previous two features.  Locke in my view is more a theatrical conceit turned into a cinematic one (a man is driving and taking calls from half a dozen people as his life falls apart), and such works are rarely fully successful.  Despite a certain competence, the situation is ultimately a bit contrived.  Wow, Brainstorm is a forgettable movie:  I completely forgot it when I first made this post.  Probably the most unimiginative of virtual reality movies, it was made worse that I thought Natalie Wood was playing Louise Fletcher's role.

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I've seen a few movies recently:

 

A Place in the Sun- Loved this movie.  I am a big fan of Montgomery Clift.  Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters are starting to grow on me as well.  I loved the mood of this movie and the way it was shot.  I particularly liked the steamy (for 1951) love scenes and the love triangle aspect.  I thought Clift did a great job.  It was interesting to see him as more of a romantic lead.  I haven't seen him in that type of role before.  In the films I've seen, he's more of a loner typeIt was interesting seeing him dancing with Shelley Winters and Elizabeth Taylor and actually seeing him smile in his films.  His smiling is weird to me.  I don't know how to describe it or why.  I was saddened by Clift's fate at the end of the film. 

 

It's a Great Feeling- a Doris Day movie costarring Jack Carson and Dennis Morgan.  Doris Day is a waitress on the Warner Brothers lot who wants to get into movies.  Carson and Morgan agree to try to help her.  The two men concoct schemes to get Day discovered, but nothing works because she comes across as trying too hard.  I thought Day's fluttering eyelashes coupled with the weird mouth movements and the strange music was kind of annoying.  The highlights of the film were the various cameos by Warner Brothers stars like Joan Crawford, Edward G. Robinson, Patricia Neal and Eleanor Parker.  Throughout the film, Day's character kept referring to her fiancee, Jeffrey Bushdinkle, back her hometown of Grover's Corners, WI (or whatever the town was called).  Day was trying to decide whether she really wanted to leave Bushdinkle for a Hollywood career or return home and marry him.  Carson and Morgan, figuring Bushdinkle to be a small town good ole boy, kept pressuring Day to stay and not lose her chance at stardom.  Eventually Day returns home.  Carson and Morgan, finding out that Day is wanted for a starring role in a film, follow her.  They find Day's home and find out that her wedding to Bushdinkle is in full swing.  They hear the "I Dos" and wait to see what her fiancee looks like, figuring he was some kind of cornball hick.  Bushdinkle is conveniently hidden behind the giant Bridesmaids' hats.  Finally, the Bridesmaids move out of the way... and who is Bushdinkle? None other than my boyfriend, Errol Flynn! The best celebrity cameo of all. 

 

The Reluctant Dragon- I watched this selection from the Disney vault.  While I enjoyed the feature, including the title feature, The Reluctant Dragon, I found the scene of the women making paint for the paint department to be the most mesmerizing of all. 

 

This Property Is Condemned- While it wasn't the best movie I'd seen, I really like the pairing of Natalie Wood and Robert Redford.  I thought that Mary Badham was very good as well.  I really liked this film.  It had tinges of Splendor in the Grass.  I thought the ending was very sad. 

 

Barefoot in the Park- This film was pretty good.  Jane Fonda and Robert Redford make a good team.  I thought Charles Boyer's character was kind of weird, but liked that he hooked up with Fonda's mother.  I thought the end of the film was disappointing. 

 

Barbarella- Ridiculous movie.  I had no idea what was going on.  I found it strange but intriguing at the same time.  I was simultaneously wondering why I was watching this, but wanting to see what was going to happen next.

 

Carnal Knowledge- This film was okay.  I liked the Jack Nicholson/Ann-Margret pairing and found their relationship more interesting than Candice Bergen and Art Garfunkle.  I've seen other Mike Nichols films that I liked better than this one.

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I saw four movies last week.  The Late Mathieu Pascal was an interesting silent movie, although I remember the novel being slightly more pessimistic.  Zazie in the Metro may be the best movie I saw last month, consistently amusing and inventive, with a sharp edge.  The Candidate was a slightly better movie than I expected from one that had inspired one of Andrew Sarris' most famous putdowns.  Night Flight was the movie I watched because Canadians couldn't get to see Topaze.  It is the perfect movie for those who think Only Angels Have Wings is too interesting, but otherwise it is a serviceable movie.

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I finally got to see TOO MUCH TOO SOON last week. I loved Errol Flynn in it, I think he's great. I completely believed he was the Great One and was not disturbed by his looks at all. When they rolled out the body bag I turned the movie off-I didn't care what happened to the daughter. Funny note-when the daughter is reading a "fan" magazine in the opening shot, Errol Flynn is on the cover!

 

JACK THE GIANT KILLER- gamble as to whether this would be good or terrible....I liked it. Gorgeous Technicolor and non-Harryhousen puppet stop animation. Pretty interesting fantasy but I'll probably never watch it again.

 

THE SAVAGE ONES- excellent Burt Lancaster film borrowed from the library. Read about it in Shelly Winter's autobiography & had to check it out. Story about gang violence with Lancaster playing the DA, his wife is a liberal sympathizer. Same sort of atmosphere as Blackboard Jungle, but much better. LOVED the ending, it was beautifully photographed, well written, well acted & well edited. 

 

ANYTHING ELSE- a typical Woody Allen. Not quite as good as others, but I enjoyed it. Christina Ricci (great actress imho) plays an abhorrent girlfriend which comes off tragically funny. EVERY 16 year old boy should see this movie in preparation for dating. It was funny to see Woody Allen handling a gun and driving a car!

 

RIDING IN CARS WITH BOYS- a really nice film directed by Penny Marshall that just presents the charactors & situations without judging. I love Drew Barrymore as an actress and enjoyed the touches of the 60's. TikiKid asked "why does she have TAPE on her cheeks?" and I had to explain the rage of day "spit-curls"...yup, I taped 'em too! This movie (as well as Allen's films) are my modern day answer to classic "programmers": smaller movies that center around people, personalities & foibles. Not EVERYTHING has top be a blockbuster, does it?

 

ALL IN THE FAMILY Season 2- just wanted to revisit these excellent episodes. Many feature early roles for future stars or later roles for classic movie stars. The acting & writing is amazing but of course much has shifted with time-no one can relate to women who stay home & cook or the man being the sole breadwinner. It was typical for newlyweds to live with parents until getting on their feet, then unheard of, now kids move back in to take care of elderly parents....but without the generational conflicts of the 70's. Very interesting.

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I finally got to see TOO MUCH TOO SOON last week. I loved Errol Flynn in it, I think he's great. I completely believed he was the Great One and was not disturbed by his looks at all. When they rolled out the body bag I turned the movie off-I didn't care what happened to the daughter. Funny note-when the daughter is reading a "fan" magazine in the opening shot, Errol Flynn is on the cover!

 

JACK THE GIANT KILLER- gamble as to whether this would be good or terrible....I liked it. Gorgeous Technicolor and non-Harryhousen puppet stop animation. Pretty interesting fantasy but I'll probably never watch it again.

 

THE SAVAGE ONES- excellent Burt Lancaster film borrowed from the library. Read about it in Shelly Winter's autobiography & had to check it out. Story about gang violence with Lancaster playing the DA, his wife is a liberal sympathizer. Same sort of atmosphere as Blackboard Jungle, but much better. LOVED the ending, it was beautifully photographed, well written, well acted & well edited.

 

ANYTHING ELSE- a typical Woody Allen. Not quite as good as others, but I enjoyed it. Christina Ricci (great actress imho) plays an abhorrent girlfriend which comes off tragically funny. EVERY 16 year old boy should see this movie in preparation for dating. It was funny to see Woody Allen handling a gun and driving a car!

 

RIDING IN CARS WITH BOYS- a really nice film directed by Penny Marshall that just presents the charactors & situations without judging. I love Drew Barrymore as an actress and enjoyed the touches of the 60's. TikiKid asked "why does she have TAPE on her cheeks?" and I had to explain the rage of day "spit-curls"...yup, I taped 'em too! This movie (as well as Allen's films) are my modern day answer to classic "programmers": smaller movies that center around people, personalities & foibles. Not EVERYTHING has top be a blockbuster, does it?

 

ALL IN THE FAMILY Season 2- just wanted to revisit these excellent episodes. Many feature early roles for future stars or later roles for classic movie stars. The acting & writing is amazing but of course much has shifted with time-no one can relate to women who stay home & cook or the man being the sole breadwinner. It was typical for newlyweds to live with parents until getting on their feet, then unheard of, now kids move back in to take care of elderly parents....but without the generational conflicts of the 70's. Very interesting.

I'm glad you got to see The Young Savages. It was a great ending, wasn't it? Took me by surprise. I like Burt Lancaster. My favorite movie of his was Come Back, Little Sheba.

I too liked Riding in Cars with Boys. Just saw it on Netflix. I liked the era and the way they displayed the humor. I'm not that fond of the more recent movies (for me the 1990's +up.)

All in the Family was fantastic. Wow the "discussions" they had. I don't watch any sitcoms of today but I never see the kind of content like AITF. I mean Archie said god d*** in the episode "Draft Dodger." Have we really gone so far backward that content like what they discussed can't even be approached today? Or maybe I am wrong because I don't watch anything these days. Wish they would stop the "reality" show garbage. All of it.

Oh that was cute about TikiKid and the tape. One more thing, I love your animated icons. Is that the correct name for the little smileys ?

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I'd pick those Attenborough movies and British noirs as my collective favorites.  From The Sand Pebbles in Wednesday prime time  through The Secret Partner the following afternoon, we got 24 consecutive hours with 14 absolute gems.

 

8:00 PM Sand Pebbles, The (1966)

A naval engineer stationed in 1926 China defies local authorities to rescue a group of missionaries.

DirRobert Wise CastSteve McQueen , Richard Attenborough , Richard Crenna .

C-179 mins, CC, Letterbox Format

 

11:15 PM 10 Rillington Place (1970)

A serial killer frames a mentally challenged man.

DirRichard Fleischer CastRichard Attenborough , Judy Geeson , John Hurt .

C-111 mins, CC, Letterbox Format

 

1:15 AM Angry Silence, The (1960)

A young factory worker stands alone against a proposed strike.

DirGuy Green CastRichard Attenborough , Pier Angeli , Michael Craig .

BW-96 mins, Letterbox Format

 

3:00 AM Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964)

A medium kidnaps a child so she can help the police solve the crime.

DirBryan Forbes CastKim Stanley , Richard Attenborough , Mark Eden .

BW-116 mins, CC, Letterbox Format

 

5:00 AM League of Gentlemen, The (1961)

A veteran recruits a group of disgraced colleagues to perform a bank robber.

DirBasil Dearden CastJack Hawkins , Nigel Patrick , Roger Livesey .

BW-114 mins, CC,

 

29 Thursday

7:00 AM Florentine Dagger, The (1935)

A playwright descended from the Borgias becomes a murder suspect.

DirRobert Florey CastDonald Woods , Margaret Lindsay , C. Aubrey Smith .

BW-69 mins,

 

8:15 AM Mystery Of Mr. X, The (1934)

A sophisticated jewel thief tries to prove himself innocent of a string of cop murders.

DirEdgar Selwyn CastRobert Montgomery , Elizabeth Allen , Lewis Stone .

BW-84 mins, CC,

 

9:45 AM Crime Unlimited (1935)

A young police academy recruit tries to break up a gang of thieves.

DirRalph Ince CastEsmond Knight , Lilli Palmer , Cecil Parker .

BW-71 mins,

 

11:00 AM London By Night (1937)

A blackmailer holds the key to several murders.

DirWilliam Thiele CastGeorge Murphy , Rita Johnson , Virginia Field .

BW-69 mins,

 

12:15 PM Haunted Honeymoon (1940)

British sleuth Sir Peter Wimsey's wedding celebration is cut short by the discovery of a murdered man in his honeymoon cottage.

DirArthur B. Woods CastRobert Montgomery , Constance Cummings , Leslie Banks .

BW-83 mins, CC,

 

1:45 PM Shadows On The Stairs (1941)

A series of mysterious murders haunts the inhabitants of a boarding house.

DirD. Ross Lederman CastFrieda Inescort , Paul Cavanagh , Heather Angel .

BW-64 mins,

 

3:00 PM Crack-Up (1946)

An art critic risks his reputation and his life to track down a forgery racket.

DirIrving Reis CastPat O'Brien , Claire Trevor , Herbert Marshall .

BW-93 mins, CC,

 

4:45 PM Runaway Bus, The (1954)

A London motor coach gets lost in the fog with a cache of stolen gold aboard.

DirVal Guest CastFrankie Howerd , Margaret Rutherford , Petula Clark .

BW-74 mins,

 

6:15 PM Secret Partner, The (1961)

A shipping tycoon with a record becomes a suspect when money goes missing from the company vault.

DirBasil Dearden CastStewart Granger , Haya Harareet , Bernard Lee .

BW-91 mins, Letterbox Format

 

 

And then the next evening they topped it off with maybe the best movie of the entire month, Trevor Howard's They Made Me a Fugitive, an Essential if ever there was one.  All in all, one of the best weeks in a long, long time.  It more than makes up for the usual repeats of the same old same old musicals and other "family fare", and gives us plenty of first rate recorded fare to get us through Oscar month.

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I haven't seen as many movies this week as I did last:

 

The Outsiders, I thought this was a great movie.  Very sad though.  It was interesting to see so many stars so young: Tom Cruise, Rob Lowe, Matt Dillon, Diane Lane, Patrick Swayze... Ralph Macchio looked young, but he always looks young.  I decided to follow this up with Dirty Dancing and make it a Patrick Swayze marathon.  So all in all, it was a good evening.

 

Trapeze, I'm a fan of Burt Lancaster and I'd heard he did his own trapeze work.  Being intrigued by that, I recorded this film.  Tony Curtis was good although to me, he always seems the same in his movies, but he was good in this film and seems to pair up well with Lancaster.  Gina Lollabrigida was whatever, I wasn't expecting much from her.  I also recorded the other film that TCM paired up with this one, The Sweet Smell of Success also starring Lancaster and Curtis, but I haven't watched it yet.  Burt Lancaster was a great actor and I look forward to seeing more of his work.

 

Irma La Douce, I recorded this because it was Billy Wilder and starred Jack Lemmon.  Usually the Lemmon/Wilder combos are pretty good.  This film was okay.  The Paris scenery was gorgeous, I loved the colors and I loved Shirley MacLaine's prostitute costumes.  There were funny parts here and there, but Lemmon was a little over the top.  While the film was entertaining, I think that Lemmon, Wilder and MacLaine have all done better, The Apartment (for example).  It seems TCM was having a Paris-themed movie marathon that day, which normally I would love... but I wish that they had put Funny Face in place of the horrible Love in the Afternoon.  They would have still had Paris, Audrey and the May-December romance angle, but there would have been a much better film. 

 

Under the Yum Yum Tree, This film was weird.  Jack Lemmon made some interesting films in the early-mid 60s after The Apartment.  I didn't like Lemmon's lecherous landlord character.  His cool concept sports car and Edie Adams was the best part about this film. 

 

I've got so many movies on the DVR to watch and a gazillion more to record next month, I hope I can find time for all of them.

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BELLS ARE RINGING- Not only did I get to hear what Judy Holliday's real voice sounded like, I also got to hear Jean Stapleton's as well.  Very interesting.  It's amazing how Holliday created such a different voice for her Billie Dawn character in Born Yesterday.  I really like Judy in this film, she's a great singer. . . .   Judy works for an answering service and frequently passes on tidbits of information to other clients when she thinks she can help. 

 

I also loved the diffrent voices that Judy Holliday used on the phone as a part of her job for the answering service in BELLS ARE RINGING. None of the voices sounded "fake"-----which is not usually the case when movie actors do "voices."

Her voice had such range and versatility, but I think she is most remembered for the voice she used in BORN YESTERDAY.

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I also loved the diffrent voices that Judy Holliday used on the phone as a part of her job for the answering service in BELLS ARE RINGING. None of the voices sounded "fake"-----which is not usually the case when movie actors do "voices."

Her voice had such range and versatility, but I think she is most remembered for the voice she used in BORN YESTERDAY.

I loved the different voices too.  Judy Holliday was excellent.  It's a shame that cancer claimed her at such a young age.  I first saw her in Born Yesterday and since then, I've been trying to see all the other films she appears in.  She's always been the highlight in each of her films.  Before I saw Bells Are Ringing, I didn't realize what a great singer she was.  She apparently had all kinds of jazz albums and such.  I love her voice it's very rich and bluesy. 

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The Outsiders, I thought this was a great movie. 


 


Heh one of TikiKid's faves.


 


Tony Curtis was good although to me, he always seems the same in his movies,


 


You need to see him in The Boston Strangler-he's chilling.


 


Burt Lancaster was a great actor and I look forward to seeing more of his work.


 


Burt has always struck me similarly to Errol in that he was a sexy hunk first, then expanded his roles to showcase his talent. (although he continued to be gorgeous throughout his career) After reading his biography, I'm not wholly convinced he took acting as seriously as say, those involved in the Actor's Studio, but he had a powerful screen presence.


 


Irma La Douce


 


I agree with your take on it 100%


 


I had forgotten to add, my least favorite of the week was LAST OF THE MOHICANS, which I could not get through. I wanted to see it because it's a historical story set in my neck of the woods, but I loathe Randolph Scott and hate seeing Native Americans treated like animals.

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I saw six movies last week.  Mr. Turner and Leviathan were clearly the best.  The first presents the greatest British painter as an inarticulate almost gargoyle, living his life, developing his art, while the film develops with considerable subtlety.   The one problem with it are cheap shots at the expense of John Ruskin.  Much contemporary criticism shared his moralism, but not his insight.  The second, not to be confused with the fishing documentary released a couple of years ago, is a compelling portrait of modern Russia filled with corruption and despair (the entire film is shot in shades of gray).  Still the Enemy Within is a competent if not brilliant documentary sympathetic to the 1984 British Miners strike.  Cockfighter is an interesting drama about a man involved in the world of cockfights.  It's interesting and shows a side of America that most Hollywood movies don't bother with, although the sound on the youtube video where I saw it was the best.  You would probably have to like Barbra Streisand more than I do to really love Yentl, which takes more than two hours to tell a fairly short Isaac Bashevis Singer story.  But if you like her songs and are willing to tolerate her monopoly of screen time, you can enjoy the movie.  By contrast, The Imitation Game does not bear close examination.  It starts off with Benedict Cumberbatch giving his best Sherlock/Sheldon Cooper impression.  Even if you find this amusing, and I admit that I did, the liberties taken with the truth, the simple mindedness and lack of subtlety become increasingly irritating.

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Night Flight ... is the perfect movie for those who think Only Angels Have Wings is too interesting,

 

Ha!  And, yeah.  There are a couple of good lines, and Myrna Loy makes anything better, but that film is just sort of there.  Clark Gable is mute the whole film, and we can barely see him, either, thanks to his mask.  Great cast, but a terrible waste of them.  We see the most from Helen Hayes, but her character bugs me. 

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I saw five movies this week.  Manhattan Melodrama is the kind of classic Hollywood movie classic Hollywood movie fans love and for good reason.  While by no means a thoughtful or profound movie, it's enjoyable because the three stars, William Powell, Clark Gable and Myrna Loy give it their all while playing roles that trade on their movie star persona.  Incidentally, it's striking how Powell's character resembles Thomas Dewey, at least up until the end of the movie.  Dewey even vaguely looks like Powell, though apparently he was not as remotely as charismatic.  American Sniper is another disappointing best picture nominee   I think Eastwood was trying to have it both ways, as opposed to having a genuinely complex picture of the Second Gulf war.  On the one hand the pro-war argument is presented as a heroic struggle against ruthlessly vicious enemies.  On the other hand, the constant struggle clearly has an unpleasant effect on Bradley Cooper's character.  But the overall result is schematic, somewhat obvious at times, and rather shallow.  Smash-up:  the story of a Woman is an adequate movie in a genre that has little attraction to me:  the perils of alcoholism.  The Four Musketeers is an improvement over The Five Musketeers which I had seen a few months ago.  Apparently the Lester The Three Musketeers is the keeper.  This movie was apparently made from left over footage, and while vaguely amusing in places, it lacks a certain energy and spirit.  Also, it's kind of sad that Raquel Welch dies in the end.  So, the movie of the week is The Oyster Princess.  While not the most emotionally profound of his movies, this shows a striking misc-en-scene for a 1919 movie, has a rousing musical sequence, and has some good jokes about The Oyster King's absurd number of servants.

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I saw five movies this week.  Manhattan Melodrama is the kind of classic Hollywood movie classic Hollywood movie fans love and for good reason.  While by no means a thoughtful or profound movie, it's enjoyable because the three stars, William Powell, Clark Gable and Myrna Loy give it their all while playing roles that trade on their movie star persona.  Incidentally, it's striking how Powell's character resembles Thomas Dewey, at least up until the end of the movie.  Dewey even vaguely looks like Powell, though apparently he was not as remotely as charismatic.  American Sniper is another disappointing best picture nominee   I think Eastwood was trying to have it both ways, as opposed to having a genuinely complex picture of the Second Gulf war.  On the one hand the pro-war argument is presented as a heroic struggle against ruthlessly vicious enemies.  On the other hand, the constant struggle clearly has an unpleasant effect on Bradley Cooper's character.  But the overall result is schematic, somewhat obvious at times, and rather shallow.  Smash-up:  the story of a Woman is an adequate movie in a genre that has little attraction to me:  the perils of alcoholism.  The Four Musketeers is an improvement over The Five Musketeers which I had seen a few months ago.  Apparently the Lester The Three Musketeers is the keeper.  This movie was apparently made from left over footage, and while vaguely amusing in places, it lacks a certain energy and spirit.  Also, it's kind of sad that Raquel Welch dies in the end.  So, the movie of the week is The Oyster Princess.  While not the most emotionally profound of his movies, this shows a striking misc-en-scene for a 1919 movie, has a rousing musical sequence, and has some good jokes about The Oyster King's absurd number of servants.

The best movie on TCM this week was arguably THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM, which I actually saw for the first time start to finish beginning at 4: 30 AM this morning. Many didn't like Preminger, but he certainly directed a number of great films.

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The best movie on TCM this week was arguably THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM, which I actually saw for the first time start to finish beginning at 4: 30 AM this morning. Many didn't like Preminger, but he certainly directed a number of great films.

I just recorded this movie today to watch later.  I recorded it for the cast (Sinatra, Eleanor Parker and Kim Novak) and also because I've found that I really enjoy Preminger's films.  I was hoping that it was a good film and I'm glad to read that it was enjoyable.  I look forward to seeing it.

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I just recorded this movie today to watch later.  I recorded it for the cast (Sinatra, Eleanor Parker and Kim Novak) and also because I've found that I really enjoy Preminger's films.  I was hoping that it was a good film and I'm glad to read that it was enjoyable.  I look forward to seeing it.

I don't know if "enjoyable" is the word I would apply to a film such as this, but so be it.

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