Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Film noir runneth over on the schedule lately


Recommended Posts

misswonderly don't worry about disagreeing with me or what I post, not all of the movies I post here I will have seen. BTW I saw earlier Unfaithfully Yours and there is a good murder scene the conductor daydreams about his wife, but when he tries to pull it off it doesn't go as planned. Not really a great comedy movie but I can see why they listed it. That one is on FMC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Every studio put out "B" pictures. Although RKO was one of the big "5" { MGM,Warners,.Paramount, 20th Century Fox , }, they relied on "B" films to fill out their schedules. Many of their stars were considered"B" actors. Robert Mitchum { he hadn't hit the super star status yet } Lawrence Tierney, Jean Greer, Robert Ryan, Gloria Graham are a few who fell into this slot. That is not to say they were not talented, they were, but the majority of their films were considered "B" movies. The bottom of the double bills. "Crossfire" had a budget of estimated 250K, which placed it in the "B" listings.Beside the stars, many directors like Robert Wise, Val Lewton, Edward Dymtryk and others learned their craft by turning out "B"'s Their westerns with Tim Holt, the detective films like "The Saint" and the "Falcon" were considered "B" films.RKO did produce "A" pictures, but like I said, they relied on the "B" pictures more then the other majors.But many of those "B" films are today considered classics and rightly so.. So when I say "B", don't think I'm putting these wonderful films down. I'm just stating what category they fell into at the time they were released.

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Apr 15, 2011 3:02 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what was considered B level at the time of release. But MALTESE FALCON certainly has a low budget look to it, and most of the cast, save Ms. Astor, were right out of the formula pics. OUT OF THE PAST is similarly small of stature. So is THE GLASS KEY, despite the presence of a major star. Then there's the unabashedly cheap. DEADLINE AT DAWN, DOA, THE NARROW MARGIN.

 

The genre cries for this simplicity of production, and of marketing. Would DETOUR have worked with Gable and Colbert?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would place "The Maltese Falcon" as a "B" film. like you stated it has that low budget look to it. Bogart was not the major star he would become soon. He got the role because the major star George Raft turned it down, not wanting to work for a first time director and chose to do "Manpower" with Eddie Robinson and Marlene Dietrich instead.Most of the truly great noir's were "B"'s. Of course there were exceptions. "The Big Sleep' was a "A" picture, but Bogie had moved to major star status by that time. "The Postman Always Rings Twice" is , to me, another "A" film noir. But I think most of the true film noirs were in the "B" category. "Detour", "Brute Force", "D.O.A", "This Gun for Hire", "Murder, My Sweet", "Raw Deal",all these and many others great noir films fall into that "B" slot. I thank God for that because they had a wonderful look to them, with the studios not pouring millions into them.

No, "Detour" would not have been the same film with Gable and Colbert.

Link to post
Share on other sites

THE MALTESE FALCON a "B" film? If it were, it would have carried Bryan Foy's name on it, not that of Hal Wallis.

 

As far as Raft turning down FALCON for MANPOWER, that's just not so, it was already in the can. According to the book "Bogart" by Sperber and Lax, Raft had Bogart knocked off the cast list of the latter, refusing to work with him.

 

There's some conjecture that Bogart, wanting the part of Spade, was influential upon Raft's decision to turn down the film. Bogart is said to have told Raft that it wasn't an important film and that he would be wasting his talents. Huston wanted Bogart all along, the two knowing each other from HIGH SIERRA and he was delighted when Raft complained that he wasn't an important enough director.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> No, but DETOUR would have been great with John Gilbert and Garbo.

 

Ann Savage would eat Garbo for breakfast. I think that Tom and Ann were perfect for their parts. I can't see anyone else doing it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> That was supposed to be a joke.

 

 

Sorry. I'm not really humor impaired. But, I'd bet I'm not the only one around here who would think that serious, given other casting suggestions I've seen. And, I'd bet that some would even agree with it. >shock smiley<

Link to post
Share on other sites

Loved Death of a Scoundrel. Did anyone else see this gem? Great script and direction by Charles Martin, George Sanders in a part that's perfect for him, outstanding photography by James Wong Howe, and one of Max Steiner's very best scores.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...