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Film noir runneth over on the schedule lately


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I had forgotten the details of all those franchise changes. The Browns

were a more formidable team in the mid 1960s than they have been in

recent years. Maybe one of these days they'll even make it to the Super

Bowl.

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Do you know who owns the rights to the history of those Browns? i.e. what team has the trophies and displays them?

 

The old Browns became the Ravens if my memory is correct while the Baltimore Colts moved to Indie. So I know that between these 3 teams who has the rights to what as it relates to the prior history has always been a mess.

 

This mess just increased with the Browns since (if my memory is right again), the Browns didn't even exist for a few years. Thus I assume the Raven owners took those trophies with them when they moved. Did they sell them to the new Brown owners?

 

 

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From what I have read part of the deal that former Browns owner Art Modell made with the city of Cleveland and the NFL was to give up his rights to the team name , colors, etc when Modell took his business to Baltimore. So essentially the Baltimore Ravens are a "new" franchise and the recreated Cleveland Browns inherited all of the previous Browns history and imagery. No such arraignment was made when the Colts left Baltimore to move to Indianapolis (which was years before the Browns deal). Cleveland didn't have an NFL team for 3 years while Baltimore waited 13 years before getting its new franchise. By the way its now over 15 years that Los Angeles doesn't have an NFL team. --

 

Edited by: mrroberts on Dec 6, 2011 3:25 PM

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Normally when a team moves, all its records, memorabilia, and tradition move with it. The glory of the Baltimore Colts now, e.g., belongs to the Indianapolis Colts. But in the case of the new Cleveland Browns, an exception was made. As part of the deal that allowed Art Modell to move the old Browns to Baltimore, it was agreed that any new Cleveland team would be called the Browns and would be considered the continuation of the old Cleveland Browns. The Baltimore Ravens are actually considered an expansion team.

 

Edited by: finance on Dec 6, 2011 4:52 PM

 

Edited by: finance on Dec 6, 2011 5:39 PM

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The movie I was thinking about was *Lady In The Lake*. It starts off with people singing Christmas carols. :0

 

In the schedule I see a few regular noirs listed, but also see a couple that only come up as possible noirs. 1949 Obsession, 1955 A Bullet For Joey 1942 Grand Central Murder. FMC has Where the sidewalk Ends, Dressed To Kill

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> {quote:title=mrroberts wrote:}{quote}Doesn't look like there are any film noir pictures on the horizon at TCM or FMC, guess its the time of the year, no Christmas themed noirs made.

 

Well, sort of. *Christmas Holiday* is a solid noir, with Christmas as part of the setting.

 

There is Michael Curtiz's film *We're No Angels*, a slightly noirish crime/comedy film, starring:

 

 

Humphrey Bogart ... Joseph

Aldo Ray ... Albert

 

Peter Ustinov ... Jules

 

Joan Bennett ... Amelie Ducotel

 

Basil Rathbone ... Andre Trochard

Leo G. Carroll ... Felix Ducotel

John Baer ... Paul Trochard

Gloria Talbott ... Isabelle Ducotel

Lea Penman ... Mme. Parole

John Smith ... Medical Officer Arnaud

 

And there is the 1949 film *Holiday Affair*, which is very Christmasy, and has a few noirish elements, and a noir cast:

 

Robert Mitchum ... Steve Mason

 

Janet Leigh ... Connie Ennis

Wendell Corey ... Carl Davis

Gordon Gebert ... Timmy Ennis

Griff Barnett ... Mr. Ennis

Esther Dale ... Mrs. Ennis

Henry O'Neill ... Mr. Crowley

 

Harry Morgan ... Police Lieutenant (as Henry Morgan)

Larry J. Blake ... Johnson - Plainclothesman

Helen Brown ... Emily

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No, no, no, you've got it all wrong... it's the one where Mitchum spots the young son of a good lookin' woman shoplifting a toy. He tries to cover for them by swallowing the evidence. But, he chokes to death, and falls dead at Santa's feet. This scares the bejezus out of all the little kids waiting in line to see Santa, and they run screaming through the store. A Christmas tree with lighted candles is knocked over, starting a huge fire that kills a store full of holiday shoppers. :)

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'No, no, no, you've got it all wrong... it's the one where Mitchum spots the young son of a good lookin' woman shoplifting a toy. He tries to cover for them by swallowing the evidence. But, he chokes to death, and falls dead at Santa's feet. This scares the bejezus out of all the little kids waiting in line to see Santa, and they run screaming through the store. A Christmas tree with lighted candles is knocked over, starting a huge fire that kills a store full of holiday shoppers '

 

Wow that one sounds wild.

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I also see no noir qualities in We're No Angels. Yea, there is a death but just because a camp comedy movies has a death that doesn't make it a noir movie. I also don't see much of a Christmas element here either.

 

Just because a movie has some noir icons doesn't make it even a slightly noir in my view. But hey I'll give people credit for trying to bring noir to the holiday season!

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Yes, it's quite a stretch to turn Holiday Affair, a charming little romantic

comedy, into a noir or even a near noir. But if you wanted to, I would

have Bob remain a good guy and make Wendell into a psychotic who

grows more and more angry as he realizes he is losing Janet.

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Noir City's website claims that this one below is a classic Christmas Noir

 

Lady On A Train (1945) Dir. Charles David. 94 min

 

Nikki Collins (Deanna Durbin) witnesses a murder while waiting for a train, but can't get the police to believe her when no body is discovered. While they dismiss her as daft, she enlists the help of a mystery writer to sleuth out the culprits on her own. Based on a story by veteran mystery writer Leslie Charteris (The Saint), this is a wildly entertaining mix of comedy, musical, and suspense, rendered in evocative noir style by cameraman Woody Bredell (Phantom Lady, Christmas Holiday, The Killers), and featuring a superb cast of sinister and suspicious supporting players swirling ominously around "America's Sweetheart."

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