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Down with the modern films


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I have to say I was disappointed to see "Parenthood" listed on TCM a few nights ago. I didn't check the info for the movie, but I can only guess it was the movie starring Kirstie Alley. I don't know about the rest of you, but is anyone getting that letdown, panic, disgust, rolleyes feeling whenever you see a modern movie on TCM that you can easily rent a dirty worn copy of at any corner video store for .99?

 

Don't turn into AMC, don't turn into AMC....

 

please?

 

 

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If it helps no,no it is as the other poster stated a movie with Steve Martin and a fine movie. If it helps it has Jason Robards in it and he does a fine grumpy but big-hearted guy role in this one. It also has (msp) sorry Dian Weiz who won the Academy Award for Hannah and her sisters and a just starting out Keenue Reeves, Martha Plimpton and one of the Culkin brothers or Pheonix brothers(not the more famously known ones). Give it a try I think you will like it or I hope you will. I should tell you there is some funny but potentially offensive scenes and I wonder if TCM will show it(them). It also has the actress who plays the mother in Joan of Arcardia in it she plays Steve Martin's wife. Let us know how you liked it if you watch-take care.....gwtwbooklover

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  • 1 month later...

While I agree that sometimes the word "classic" is overused - like the word "legendary" - if you have a cut off year, you miss some gems.

 

For example, a few weeks ago TCM showed TOOTSIE and SOME LIKE IT HOT back to back. TOOTSIE came out in 1981 yet I think it's a classic with a fine, timeless performance by Dustin Hoffman that stands alongside the performances of Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon and Joe E. Brown in SLIH.

 

One thing - were I programming TCM, I'd keep the newer ones to a minimum (yes, even dear TOOTSIE) if they can be seen readily on other channels.

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I agree completely with the notion that modern films are better served by other media venues. There are many modern films I love -- but if they were made in the last 25 years and they're on TCM, there better be a real good reason. (Tandem screenings of related movies are interesting -- but could understandably be seen as a trojan horse.)

 

Heck, I'm not even entirely comfortable with color movies. Sometimes I watch TV on the little 5" B&W TV in my home office just 'cause it makes regular content feel a tiny bit more like an old movie. Law & Order as it would have looked... ah, never mind.

 

Oh, and, BTW, if anyone cares what I think I would have no problems whatsoever if all movies were presented in their original aspect ratio. I despise pan and scan...

 

[PS... perversely enough, when I was a kid and my family was the second on the block to buy a color TV I would watch the worst drek if it was in color and I hated the (then very rare) letterbox presentations of widescreen movies. A guy grows up...]

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I agree completely with harlowkeatongirl, especially since there is another cable channel in my area one notch down from TMC which plays "Parenthood" style movies 24/7.

 

I agree also with the person who suggest a limit, but I think 1970 is pushing it. I'd put it at 20 years, so the actual year limit changes.

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I wonder if we'll ever have a channel devoted exclusively to the pre-1964 stuff. That would be the cutoff for me, even though I love many films made since the late '70s. The late '60s to early '70s is my least favorite period in film-making (I call it Film's Adolescence, because so many of the movies are smirky and loaded with annoyingly superfluous profanity), but it now comprises "old movies" in the minds of many.

 

I agree with the person who said that it feels as if the time spent running the newer release could be better spent by TCM on a rarer black-and-white.

 

Have you noticed that you often can channel-surf now (even with a satellite system and more than 100 channels) and never happen upon any film or TV made before 1975? I find this very depressing.

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They should create a commercial-free channel dedicated to contemporary classics.

 

Fox Movie Channel is already a lot like that. They'll show some of the great films from the 60s and 70s mixed in with movies like Less Than Zero from the late '80s, etc. And ones even younger than that, too. I tape movies off FMC quite a lot.. love it.

 

TCM should just be from the beginning of the film era to about 1964 at the latest. That's just my opinion.

 

For example I plan on recording Beaches from 1988 off TCM tonight. A great one and a definite modern classic... but too young for TCM I think.

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I am a fan of modern cinema (mainly exceptional Foreign and Independent films, as well as the occasional stellar Hollywood film), but I agree with many here who say that a cutoff date should possibly be implemented. I think there are dozens of films released since 1970 that I consider 'classics,' but as mentioned, those films do turn up on other channels. But where else are we going to see many pre-1960 films? Let's not forget silent films. An acquired taste, I know, but they just don't show up anywhere else on the tube.

 

As far as ayresorchids labelling of the late 60's to early 70's as "film's adolescence" due to excess profanity, well I don't know what to say. I loved that period and feel it may have been Hollywood's last charge of bold, innovative filmmaking. Many of these films were raw, but it seemed to me that Hollywood was letting out much that was repressed during the years that the production code was being enforced with an iron fist. The dam had burst in the late 60's and filmmakers were able to take real chances for the first time in decades, for better or worse.

 

I am one of those people who doesn't really mind profane language or images in film. I will cringe at times if it gets too gratuitous, but it fails to shock me. Many films from that period were somewhat profane, but after JAWS was released in 1975, the blockbuster became Hollywood's priority. Jump to today, when the well of creativity in Hollywood is at an all-time low. Remakes, sequels to lousy films, Pop Star vehicles, etc. I long for the days of MEAN STREETS, THE WILD BUNCH, THE GODFATHER (parts 1&2), MIDNIGHT COWBOY, CHINATOWN, A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, THE FRENCH CONNECTION, THE EXORCIST, etc.

 

Anyway, although there's a wealth of good movies since 1970 (just one opinion), I enjoy TCM and the fact that the majority of films shown are 'older' films is really pleasing to me. We have all proven that there is a vast audience for these films.......

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very late 60s to the early 70s (ending with Jaws) is one of the greatest eras in american movies and my personal favorite era. the ones that keithfromkc listed are well known and on cable from time to time, while other classics like five easy pieces, shampoo, badlands, harold & maude, 2 lane blacktop, early bogdanovich & rbt altman movies are shown a little less. a lot of these are probably not considered commercial enough to show on channels which feature newer blockbuster movies.

 

i still agree that anything even remotely "parenthood"-like is horrible for TCM

 

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doomilla,

 

Some great choices you mentioned! I was gonna throw in BADLANDS, as well as almost anything Jack Nicholson was in during this time, but didn't want to go overboard. Robert Altman was also producing his best work around that time. But you do nail the point home that some great American cinema was being made during that period......

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American cinema, and to some degree much of American culture, peaked in December, 1974 with the release of THE GODFATHER PART II. There has not been a comparable masterpiece since then and, I feel, that films and filmmaking have been in a continual downward spiral. However, while still close to the peak, there were more than a few excellent movies released after G-II, until JAWS and then STAR WARS ultimately, tragically, helped bring us to the era we are currently mired in. There will always be great films made, now and in the future, but the consistent levels of merit and accomplishment in the years between SUNRISE (1927) and THE GODFATHER PART II may never pass this way again.

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keithfromkc - if you're a nicholson fan of that era, you should check out DRIVE HE SAID ... if you ever get a chance - it's rare. This was his one directoral effort and it was made right in the middle of a string of amazing films of his, EASY RIDER, CARNAL KNOWLEDGE, 5 EASY PIECES, CHINATOWN. I have to admit, it left me a little confused. It was interesting, but it's not hard to see why he stuck to acting.

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doomilla,

 

I have heard of DRIVE HE SAID, and knew Nicholson directed it, but no, I've never seen it. So you weren't real impressed with it? As you say, that stretch of films, his directorial turn notwithstanding, was a strong period for Jack. Just out of curiosity, I may have to track DRIVE HE SAID down (if possible), and give it a look. Thanks for reminding me of it.

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He Said is a decent film, but from the same year I think, one can look for Two Lane Blacktop by Monte Hellman, which is a better film in my opinion.

 

Get into a whole time warp, and rent all the films from a five year period then, like 200 Motels, Head and maybe Buster and Billie.

 

There are lots of good films from all decades, including the Seventies. One just has to separate the wheat from the chaff, as in all things.

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therealfuster,

 

You mention the ill-fated Monkee's film, HEAD, which

features Nicholson, and I'll admit that I find that

film fascinating! It's kind of a mess, but I find it

pretty entertaining! I think the soundtrack is pretty

cool and includes two songs that were miles better

than anything else the Monkees ever recorded (Porpoise

Song & As We Go Along).

 

Anyway, I haven't seen it in a few years, so I'll have

to add it to my Netflix queue.......

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  • 2 weeks later...

You don't want to put a cut-off point at 1964.

 

That would be too unfair to the Western genre. Once Upon A Time in the West, For A Few Dollars More, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, The Wild Bunch, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and many others would no longer be seen on the 'classic movie channel.'

 

We also would not be able to see THE STING

 

nor: ANNIE HALL

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY

PATTON

THE GRADUATE

COOL HAND LUKE

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

etc.

 

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