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A few of Mae's famous quotes:

 

Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly.

 

Between two evils, I always pick the one I never tried before.

 

I believe that it's better to be looked over than it is to be overlooked.

 

I only like two kinds of men, domestic and imported.

 

I'll try anything once, twice if I like it, three times to make sure.

 

When I'm good I'm very, very good, but when I'm bad, I'm better.

 

You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough

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One of the most classic moments in the career of Mae came, when she was on the highly popular radio program, ?The Chase & Sanborn Hour ? Starring Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy.? Of course, Bergen was perhaps the most beloved comic ventriloquist of American entertainment. His dummy, Charlie McCarthy was in his own right a major star! Anyway, on this particular program, with Mae as the special guest, little Charlie McCarthy and Mae began to have what might be considered a very, very openly risqu? conversation over the airwaves! The highpoint of the program came, when Charlie asked Mae what the two of them might do on a date together. Mae replied, ?I?ll come over and play in your woodpile!?

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It is silly since the actions of Mae didn't have an impact on how others lead their lives any more than someone else's marriage has any impact on my marriage or how I act.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Aug 18, 2010 7:50 PM

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> PrinceSaliano . . .

 

It's very true that Mae was always in big trouble with moral groups and social issues of the day. In some places, her films were banned. This sort of controversy only aided Mae in gaining a huge amount of attention, later transformed into immense popularity. It wouldn't be until the late 1950s, that Mae would be accused of glorifying the homosexual lifestyle, by way of her now legendary nightclub act. By today's standards, Mae's show was tame and harmless. But, because of the enormous amount of success Mae enjoyed, during those years she toured with her somewhat suggestive show, various cities felt somehow threaten by Mae and the tactful way she presented what was obviously a parody of her lifestyle! In those years Mae presented her stage act, she pretty much let it be known, her theories about sex, men and a phsyical passion to love. This was very daring for its day, since Mae touched upon issues that weren't really so out in the open. The truth to her whole imagery and self-promotion had more to do with Mae mocking the daily establishment that found her brand of humor and entertainment outrageous to say the least. Perhaps the most interesting thing I ever heard Mae say: "Well honey, I'm vulgar . . . _BUT_ _NOT_ _DIRTY_ . . . That's the big difference." My favorite of all Mae West song is "My Old Flame."

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>sfpcc1 you asked:

> Has anyone ever seen the Ann Jillian tv biopic on Mae West? It was made back in late 82 and I think she got an Emmy nomination.

 

Like its always been with any biographic film, a lot of fictionalization occurs, due in large part to not wanting to offend anyone or get too close to the core of real events. In the case of the 1982, television movie ?Mae West,? a certain amount of flexibility was taken, in order to create a bit of a difference to what there really was towards Mae?s life and those important people surrounding the whole aura of her lifetime saga. Nobody really expected the television movie to be able to be so frank about Mae, but in the long run, there was much to Mae?s life that was left out. Most notable was the fact that Mae had been a child performer from age 5. She was a child of show business, never having really had any sort of decent childhood. Mae?s story was typical of a girl who was push into the entertainment world, based around the failed attempt by her controlling stage mother to become a success in show business. The basis to Mae?s early life and performing career are shrouded by the presence of her mother, who stopped at nothing to make the daughter become a star.

 

The whole idea of Mae becoming a sex symbol came late in her career, when the reality of her situation was all but evident that she couldn?t get a break or be taken seriously. In a clever career move, Mae combined the aspects of the burlesque business and then that of a serious actress. It didn?t take so long for Mae to become a Broadway sensation, by way of her flamboyant and controversial stage shows that were actually dramas and not comedies or even musicals. The TV movie didn?t touch upon this area that in some regards was vital to the whole idea of what happened to Mae and finally ending up in Hollywood. There was also the issue of how Mae took total control of her film career, when she signed on at Paramount Pictures. It would have been very interesting had the TV movie showcased how Mae governed everyone around her. This was amazing, since she had no real previous experience in any sort of filmmaking!

 

The one aspect to Mae?s life that the TV movie covered somewhat correctly was her relationship with the ?drag-queen? character, Rene Valentine as played by Roddy McDowell. This character is based on Mae?s real, life-long friend, female impersonator Bert Savoy. The TV movie accurately showed how the drag-queen inspired and guided Mae to the gaudy, promiscuous imagery that would eventually make her world famous. This is the reason to why Mae was so connected and tied to that strange, shady and rather canny underworld of show business. In time, she would bring out in full force her devotion and a reaction to legitimize this portion of show business that she, unlike no other major entertainment star, understood and exploited to make Mae something of a pioneer in this field. It?s been often said that somebody had to ?get the ball rolling? towards an acceptance and facing the reality of this type of entertainment. Certainly, by the time she made it to Hollywood, Mae had all the necessary credentials.

 

For most fans, perhaps one of the most memorable events in Mae?s career was her being credited with making Cary Grant a star! The story goes that Mae was in one of the studio front offices, arguing with the staff and production crew about her latest leading man. Mae was very dissatisfied and wanted the actor replaced. In a moments notice, Mae looked out one of the office windows and saw Cary walking to a soundstage. Right away, Mae was impressed by Cary?s attractive persona. She then pointed Cary out to the production staff and said, ?He looks real good, if he can talk I?ll take him.? Well, the rest is history and Cary would forever be indebted to Mae; from that time on, Cary and Mae would remain close and trusted friends!

 

While I do like actress Ann Jillian as Mae, the problem I have with the TV movie is some of the missing parts to the puzzle of Mae?s life. Since no movie about the life and times of an entertainment star can be so candid or forthright, there could have been more thought provoking information as to give light to some of the circumstances that attempt to explain or define the various outcomes to the life of a star. Instead, most of the time, a lot of reservations have to be taken and in the case of Mae, this is rather strange, since she would be the first to say, ?Goodness had nothing to do with it!?

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See Goin' To Town if you get the chance. Mae is feisty and funny in this one. And Mae puts on an operatic version of Samson And Delilah in one scene where she wants to crash in on high society. Mae actually sounds good singing in an opera style! Who knew??

 

Also, Mae is great in Night After Night. She doesn't appear until 37 minutes in, but once she does, the film takes off in high gear.

 

Buy the Mae West Glamour Collection. You will not be disappointed if you like/love Mae. The wisecracks never stop and Mae sparkles like a neon sign in her gowns and jewels. Mae's a genius, as i don't know of any other actress that wrote all of her own dialogue. Paramount paid her as an actress and again separately as a screenwriter on her films.

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Mae's good pal and sometimes boy friend George Raft pushed for Mae to get the part in "Night After Night". Later when asked how she did he replied "She stole everything but the camera". Oddly enough, they died with in two days of each other, Nov.22 and 24,1980...

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Aug 19, 2010 10:59 AM

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Mae-West-528x768-42kb-media-882-media-80

 

 

*_Mae West Trivia_*

 

 

Was named #15 Actress on The American Film Institutes 50 Greatest Screen Legends

 

 

Born Mary Jane West in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, she always considered herself half Jewish. Her mother, Matilda Decker Doelger, an immigrant from Munich, was Jewish. Her father, Jack West, a featherweight prizefighter called "Battling Jack" West and later a stable master, was Anglo-Irish.

 

 

Eldest of three children of John Patrick West, an occasional prizefighter and livery-stable owner, and Matilda Delker Doelger, a one-time corset and fashion model.

 

The comedy entitled "Sex" she wrote in 1926 revived in NY, off Broadway, Dec. 1999.

 

One of the first women to consistently write the movies she starred in.

 

At one point, her chauffeur was Jerry Orbach (who is best known for playing Detective Lennie Briscoe on all four "Law & Order" series and "Homicide: Life on the Street" (1993).

 

 

Was banned from NBC radio after a guest appearance in 1937 with Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy loaded with flirtation and double-entendres. She returned to NBC radio as a guest on the Perry Como show in 1949.

 

 

She was with George Raft in both her first (Night After Night (1932)) and last (Sextette (1978)) film.

 

 

Mae West and Frank Wallace never shared living quarters; in fact, she denied she was ever married, a story hard to stick to when a marriage license surfaced... along with Mr. Wallace

 

 

During World War II, Navy and Army pilots and crewman in the Pacific, named their inflatable life vests after Mae West supposedly because of her well-endowed attributes. The term "Mae West" for a life-vest continues to this day.

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> {quote:title=randyishere wrote:}{quote}

>

>

> Buy the Mae West Glamour Collection. You will not be disappointed if you like/love Mae. The wisecracks never stop and Mae sparkles like a neon sign in her gowns and jewels. Mae's a genius, as i don't know of any other actress that wrote all of her own dialogue. Paramount paid her as an actress and again separately as a screenwriter on her films.

 

that is the set I own and it is so worth the price!

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Preach on sister Kim. I laughed my tail off watching the films in this collection. Some of the best money i ever spent on any dvd's. Soon after, i purchased She Done Him Wrong, Belle Of The Nineties, and Klondike Annie off of amazon. Mae sings a lot in BelleOTN. The only film that has eluded me is Sextette, but i'll pursue it again later this year. Mae rocks!

 

Oh, i forgot, Every Day's A Holiday has eluded me as well, but i'll snag a copy when it becomes available.

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> {quote:title=randyishere wrote:}{quote}

> Preach on sister Kim. I laughed my tail off watching the films in this collection. Some of the best money i ever spent on any dvd's. Soon after, i purchased She Done Him Wrong, Belle Of The Nineties, and Klondike Annie off of amazon. Mae sings a lot in BelleOTN. The only film that has eluded me is Sextette, but i'll pursue it again later this year. Mae rocks!

>

> Oh, i forgot, Every Day's A Holiday has eluded me as well, but i'll snag a copy when it becomes available.

 

Oh don't watch Sextette, not if you love Mae West! Too, too sad to see her doing her sexy, hot mama thing when she can barely walk around...and Timothy Dalton just doesn't work as her husband.

 

Even though it was pretty horrific overall (and I may get blasted but I don't care), try Myra Breckinridge. She's still Mae in that.

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