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"Moguls and Movie Stars"


Jayo

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I forgot to mention that I liked the segment the documentary did on the House Committee hearings of 1947.

 

Someone in an interview made a statement about a big mistake the commies made during the hearings, and I thought his insight was very good. He said their big mistake was to think the most important thing about their testimony was what they said and how they sounded, but in reality it was the ?way they looked? that was most important, and they looked guilty like spies or criminals, and that turned the public against them. I don?t mean the way they were dressed. I mean the way they ?looked? or ?seemed? when they were rude to the Congressmen who were asking them question.

 

Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, and some other big-name Hollywood liberals went up to DC to support the people who were testifying. This group formed a committee known as ?The Committee for the First Amendment?. However, after listening to a couple of days of testimony, they realized that the Hollywood people who were active members of the Communist Party looked so bad and so guilty and so supportive of the Soviet Union over the United States, members of that committee quietly went back to Hollywood.

 

Bogart himself wrote an article for Photoplay magazine in which he condemned the Hollywood Communists and said he was misled by them to support them at first.

 

https://docs.google.com/View?docid=dg6n6657_103f7bsqj

 

Here are some very rare photos of the Hollywood committee meeting in a strategy session, during the House Committee hearings, and listening to the testimony during the hearings:

 

Bogart, John Houston, Danny Kaye,

http://tinyurl.com/2bh3q5b

 

Bogart and Betty:

http://tinyurl.com/279j3nc

 

Betty Bacall, Bogart to her right, Richard Conte, John Garfield.

http://tinyurl.com/23fc8u5

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So the seven-part Moguls & Movie Stars series has drawn to a close. All in all, I think they have done a good job of introducing the general viewer to the history of Hollywood. People who aren't familiar with this history have responded very favorably, as numerous posts on this board alone have indicated. Because the series has aroused more interest, I'd love for TCM to follow up by programming other documentaries about the classic studio era.

 

The last episode, though good, was a little more disjointed than I would have preferred. Once we got to Bonnie & Clyde, I'd rather not have gone back to talk about the early 60s. I loved Bob Balaban's story about Midnight Cowboy. There couldn't have been a better way to show the differences between old and new Hollywood. The choice of films to accompany the last episode was again excellent.

 

I did question the phrase about Hepburn and Tracy "Lovers since 1941 . . . ." This oversimplifies a complicated relationship in the direction of Garson Kanin's romantic fiction about the pair, which has been largely discredited by, for instance, William J. Mann's biography of Hepburn. "A long, close friendship which probably on occasion included sex" sounds much clunkier, but seems to be closer to the facts, if not to the legend.

 

Who composed the excellent main theme for Moguls? I couldn't find the credit.

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OK, here is what I want for Christmas next year. A documentary about *Colleen Moore*, followed by a night of her restored films. A decade overdue. From what I understand, Hugh Hefner had thought about doing a documentary on Colleen around the same time that he produced ones for TCM on Louise Brooks ('98), Clara Bow ('99), Marion Davies (2000), and Olive Thomas (2003). Unfortunately, that never happened.

 

I'd also like to see a documentary on the Talmadge Sistes. Or maybe a 5 part series dedicated to Stars who got completely glossed over in *MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS.* But I still think that Colleen's deserves her own production. I'd also like to see the 2006 *Pola Negri* doc debut on TCM in the coming year.

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I liked the series very much.

 

It was mainly about the Moguls, which was very interesting.

 

I was a little surprised to learn about all the changes that took place in Hollywood and pre-Hollywood, just about every decade. I knew about most of the changes, such as the move from peep-shows to movies on screens, then the move to Hollywood, then the move to sound, etc., etc., but this series tied it all together and made me realize that what we think of as ?classic Hollywood? was a rather delicate place and situation, that only lasted about 20 or so years, and even then, there were changes during those years.

 

This series in itself could make a whole college semester course about the American film industry.

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"Moguls and Movie Stars" was for me Classic Movies 101. The 'evolution' of the whole movie scene was like a history lesson. I have a more mature and deeper understanding of comedy and a sincere appreciation for the 'silent' films I have never quite comprehended. Charlie Chaplin was a genius it's now clear.

 

The 30's and the 40's were just fabulous to learn about. I felt like I was in a little time capsule on Monday nights enjoying years past.

 

God Bless America ! Only in this great land of ours could the dream of immigrants change the course of what we know as entertainment.

 

It was our American Renaissance !

 

Long live TCM ! Thanks Mr. Osborne, you are the Jewel in the Crown of TCM :)

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My favorite sections were on the Silent era (probably because this is the era I know the least about). I also loved the films shown during these weeks. But overall I enjoyed the whole thing as well. I really liked how they tied the history of the US and how it impacted film into each segment.

 

It was film 101 but I never took a film course so this is the next best thing (despite some mistakes people pointed out which I am grateful for).

 

Edited by: Kinokima on Dec 14, 2010 8:35 PM

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> Ok, now that it's all over, I cannot resist: the narrator, whom everyone seems to think did an excellent job, as everyone knows was Christopher Plummer.

> *What you may not know is...yes! Christopher Plummer is Canadian.*

 

Oh, come on now! Everyone knows that most Klingons are Canadian... or is that most Canadians are Klingons? I forget... :)

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I enjoyed the whole series, and I especially learned much about the early years of silent movies. The episodes on the 30's and 40's could easily be 7-part series themselves! I would really like to see more in depth of that period.

 

Having been born and raised in the L.A. area, the early photos of the studios and the backdrops were fascinating.

 

Great job TCM! Let's see more original productions.

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Here's the thing, I would have thought two of the first people to be featured among the Moguls would have to be Nicholas and Joseph Schenck. Nick was barely mentioned at all in passing, and I'm not so sure that Joe's name even appears once in the entire series? Hey, those guys were arguably the biggest Moguls there were for quite awhile. To leave them out is beyond absurd!

 

No mention of First National and John McCormick either, since that would have definitely merited a word about Colleen Moore. And on that score Norma Shearer isn't even brought up in the Irving Thalberg segments! Just unbelievable.

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Wow, what a great way to save time and money. Instead of a trial or an investigation,

just poll the public to see if the people under scrutiny look guilty or not. No evidence,

no deliberation, just a quick look and that settles everything. I think the reason Bogie bailed

out was not so much the behavior of the Hollywood Ten, as that he believed they were not

communists and became disillusioned when he found out that they actually were or had been

reds. And then the big tough guy movie star turned into an apologetic little bowl of jelly.

That old division between fantasy and reality. Happens all the time.

 

Having contempt for a group of small-time political grifters? Nothing wrong with that,

especially as one of them, J. Parnell Thomas, the Committee's chairman, wound up in

the pokey on corruption charges Do not ask for whom the cell door closes...

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> {quote:title=kingrat wrote:}{quote}

> Who composed the excellent main theme for Moguls? I couldn't find the credit.

>

I recall gagman66 asking about that too, early in the series. No composer credit. So, who wrote the theme music and why no credit? As the series progressed, still no music credit was ever given. Just a "musicologist" (what is that anyway?)

Well, SOMEBODY composed an impressive music theme for this series. Too bad we may never know who.

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I enjoyed the series, it tells a good story. I still would have preferred two hour long episodes but I must say overall I was satisfied.

 

An extensive documentary that I would like to see is one strictly about the crumbling of the old studio system. We always hear a lot about New Hollywood but the dire situation of the studios in the late 50s and throughout the 60s is simply fascinating.

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Wonderful 7part series! Great job TCM ~ I caught only one snafu and I was wondering if anyone else caught it?! During the last part the writers were discussing the deaths of some of the major moguls including Walt Disney. It was indicated he passed away in 1966. Note to the writers: I do believe he passed in 1971.

 

All n all a terrific tool for a film history and or film appreciation college class!

 

Andrew

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> {quote:title=Andrewhsr wrote:}{quote}

> Wonderful 7part series! Great job TCM ~ I caught only one snafu and I was wondering if anyone else caught it?! During the last part the writers were discussing the deaths of some of the major moguls including Walt Disney. It was indicated he passed away in 1966. Note to the writers: I do believe he passed in 1971.

>

> All n all a terrific tool for a film history and or film appreciation college class!

>

> Andrew

 

Welcome Andrew.

 

I checked IMDB.com and Disney did die in 1966, but I'm thinking maybe Walt Disney World opened in 1971.

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