Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
misswonderly3

Somewhat Off-Topic: What have you been reading lately?

Recommended Posts

[Oh sorry, Capuchin, I meant to quote you so that you would be alerted, sorry]

 

I skimmed some of the Game of Thrones books and I watched all of the TV Show. The first shock came in the final episode when Ned Stark was beheaded. I believe that was what put us on notice. Nonetheless, in the TV Show,  there were three characters that were exempt. No one believed that Jon Snow, Tyrion, nor Danearys would be unexpectedly killed and that was right. The latter's death was not unexpected. Jon Snow was "killed" in the TV Show but was brought back to life. Tyrion was the safest of all. Had he been untimely killed the show would have lost many viewers. IMO

I am not particularly hateful about beloved characters dying. I can take it.:) (usually)

Readers of the first book deserved to know that the Palmers did not return after the war. They were the closest friends to Tillie and her husband (the protagonists) and next door neighbors. Lettice is a main character with ample but by no means dominant page time. Readers (like me) would want to know what happened to them. So, in this sense, Lettice and her husband  did not simply disappear. Her hasty departure at the end of first book mirrored what others were doing in the wake of the war. They had to leave their settlements.  Nor was she killed off as those were in GOT because she is effectively out of the ongoing story. AS you read, Hereward, her husband, became a war hero and would therefore have no interest in returning and it was not possible for her to return alone (being a woman), even if she wanted to. When we learn she is not returning we know that she is no longer in the story. The author could have just simply said they did not return and leave it that but she added that little epilogue giving her character a tragic air.

You aside regard ChickLit puzzles me. True, the Ian-Lettice connection is a love story but is ensconced in a wider more inclusive account touching upon the English experience in Colonial West Africa. Neither of the two books are examples of ChickLit. The love story takes up only a precious few pages throughout. It is not really completely developed. As I mentioned in that opening post, there many characters who shared the spotlight to varying degrees and make up an episodic and rambling story.

Your last line reminds me of a short story by Robert Sheckley  the Science Fiction writer. At the end the first-person narrator is being pursued by someone who wants to kill him. The narrator is going on and on with verbiage, and suddenly in mid-sentence he breaks off---the story is over.

//.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add. Was your ChickLit remark influenced by my avatar. The avatar is obviously a woman but I am not. Perhaps that didn't have anything to do with it. Just curious. Thanks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, laffite said:

Just to add. Was your ChickLit remark influenced by my avatar. The avatar is obviously a woman but I am not. Perhaps that didn't have anything to do with it. Just curious. Thanks.

Your avatar had no bearing at all. The thing is, I'm guilty of a little favoritism. Okay, maybe it borders on prejudice. Alright, alright, I'm an absolute bigot when it comes to literature. If a book masquerades as an historical novel, but it's intent is only to tug a few heartstrings, that, to me, is ChickLit. Now, I don't say there's anything inherently wrong with such works. People buy them to be entertained, and if story accomplishes that goal, then more power to them. On the other hand, much the same can be said about Hakarl (bury a shark in sand until fairly rotted, cut it into strips and leave them laying around a couple of months) -- some people claim it's a great delicacy and pay high prices for particularly pungent examples. Fine. If that's your flex, go for it. Just don't expect any admiration of it from me.

Edit to clarify: When I say 'tug a few heartstrings,' I'm not talking about the love story. I mean how the reader is supposed to be deeply affected by the setting and the adventurous spirit of the people. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Capuchin said:

Your avatar had no bearing at all. The thing is, I'm guilty of a little favoritism. Okay, maybe it borders on prejudice. Alright, alright, I'm an absolute bigot when it comes to literature. If a book masquerades as an historical novel, but it's intent is only to tug a few heartstrings, that, to me, is ChickLit. Now, I don't say there's anything inherently wrong with such works. People buy them to be entertained, and if story accomplishes that goal, then more power to them. On the other hand, much the same can be said about Hakarl (bury a shark in sand until fairly rotted, cut it into strips and leave them laying around a couple of months) -- some people claim it's a great delicacy and pay high prices for particularly pungent examples. Fine. If that's your flex, go for it. Just don't expect any admiration of it from me.

Well, that shows how far prejudice will get you (bordering, of course) ;) With respect, Capuchin, you said first you were "unfamiliar" with the books, then immediately after that referred to them as Chicklit, and now deny any  admiration for them without having read them.

I mentioned more than once that the love affair in the novel gets a relatively threadbare treatment in comparison with all the other things that happen and therefore simply lacks the power and influence to serve as a masquerade for the novel. The longer post I wrote above points out that it will be about one "unforgettable" character. All my attention was on her and maybe that throws you off.  Your judging the whole novel on my subject matter, which doesn't even come close to representing the whole novel. Anyone who would begin reading this book with an eye for the tugging of heart strings will be disappointed and will soon cease to turn the pages.

This is not an historical novel with ChickLit tendencies. Your thought on this reminds me of some childhood "naughty" reading, bodice rippers with heroines named Caroline Cherie, and that always had a historical setting. In our book, the name of the little girl and the author is the same and so may be taken at first as a memoir. But it's not even that. The story is not based on her experience there, it is based on her presence there. The story is mostly fiction and therefore is a novel. It is anything but hackart. I don't mean to patronize you but I would ask you to get a hold of the book and do a little reading and skimming and my guess is that you would see it as literature. You still might not like it but not for the reason you think now.

The appeal that the novel and this particular character have for me does not match with what the average ChickLit fan would like. It's about the person for me. not just the love thing. She is so deftly drawn IMO and I think she is  meant to be an endearing character and that succeeded with me. Her attraction for Ian is comprised in just two or three scenes and they are IMO beautifully and creatively done, not by a hack, but by a real writer.

Sorry to mention the avatar. I didn't really mean anything with that. I've had that avatar for ages. Once i tried to change but the few fans I have exhorted me to change it back. I have found that many still believe that I am a woman and I sometimes, subconsciously maybe, seek opportunities to set the record straight. I have no idea if Sansfin knew that or no, but i agree with you, not really important.

I hope i haven't offended in any of the posts.

 

laffite

 

,, 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Preparing a Zoom event to discuss A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh. The story is hilarious. The blurbs say that this author was quite satirical but this one introduced a serious tone to his oeuvre. The trouble is that you have to get serious about to discern it properly.  And it doesn't help not being English. The narrator of the audiobook has Brenda speaking in a little girl voice that makes one think of Marie Wilson and Gracie Allen, although these two are much to nice to be a Brenda. Brenda is given a wildly satirical line that is almost unbelievable, thus wild. I won't explain it in detail but it has something to do with her young son and her illicit lover having the same Christian name. She makes an egregious blunder, only it turned out not be a blunder, she really meant it. Her true character hinging on a Freudian slip. Oh, Brenda, woe is you! It has to be considered satirical because it is highly unlikely that anyone on the earth could have actually said such a thing and really mean it.  The ending of the novel is a real tour de force but was disappointing to learn that it was a transfigured short story already written singly to stand alone that was tacked onto the novel. Ugh. A later printing included an alternate ending that was, IMO, much more appropriate to the story although it's quite bland in comparison to the tacked on version. But I like it better. I think I will be in the minority about that at the meeting. Anyone else read this? I never get a reply when I ask that, but ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on a streak reading books about the movies lately.  

Right now, I'm re-reading David Niven's The Moon's A Balloon and Bring on the Empty Horses (in a combined volume).  The two books are full of more well-told Hollywood anecdotes than any other book on the subject.  Enjoyable from beginning to end.  (Although I'm not finished with them this time around, I've read them before.)

Before that I re-read F. Scott Fitzgerald's Pat Hobby Stories, a hilarious little book about a down-and-out screenwriter and his misadventures trying to eke out a living by working a week or two at a time for various studios.  (Some real Hollywood folks show up in the short stories, like Ronald Colman and "Young Doug," whom Pat knows, and he's drive crazy by people saying he looks just like Orson Welles.)  

And before F. Scott, I read Woody Allen's Apropos of Nothing, which, as an Allen fan, I found very interesting, fairly well-written, and funny in places.  His long career has included writing for TV and The New Yorker, stand-up comedy in the clubs, and Broadway plays, as well as his well-known film work.  Even if you skip his fairly detailed recounting of his problems with Mia Farrow (which I found interesting and pretty persuasive), it's a book worth reading, in my opinion.

Given the controversy over Allen, his book obviously won't be for everyone, but I'd highly recommend the Fitzgerald and Niven volumes to anyone who's interested in Hollywood's Golden Era.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been reminded of: The Diagram Prize which is an annual award given by a British trade journal for booksellers. Past winners include:

Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Nude Mice, University of Tokyo Press

The Joy of Chickens by Dennis Nolan

Oral Sadism and the Vegetarian Personality by Glenn C. Ellenbogen

People Who Don't Know They're Dead: How They Attach Themselves to Unsuspecting Bystanders and What to Do About It by Gary Leon Hill

Strangers Have the Best Candy by Margaret Meps Schulte

 

I thought that I might add this book to my reading list. The review has given me second thoughts.

xB4NBco.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2020 at 3:55 PM, laffite said:

Preparing a Zoom event to discuss A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh. The story is hilarious. The blurbs say that this author was quite satirical but this one introduced a serious tone to his oeuvre. The trouble is that you have to get serious about to discern it properly.  And it doesn't help not being English. The narrator of the audiobook has Brenda speaking in a little girl voice that makes one think of Marie Wilson and Gracie Allen, although these two are much to nice to be a Brenda. Brenda is given a wildly satirical line that is almost unbelievable, thus wild. I won't explain it in detail but it has something to do with her young son and her illicit lover having the same Christian name. She makes an egregious blunder, only it turned out not be a blunder, she really meant it. Her true character hinging on a Freudian slip. Oh, Brenda, woe is you! It has to be considered satirical because it is highly unlikely that anyone on the earth could have actually said such a thing and really mean it.  The ending of the novel is a real tour de force but was disappointing to learn that it was a transfigured short story already written singly to stand alone that was tacked onto the novel. Ugh. A later printing included an alternate ending that was, IMO, much more appropriate to the story although it's quite bland in comparison to the tacked on version. But I like it better. I think I will be in the minority about that at the meeting. Anyone else read this? I never get a reply when I ask that, but ...

After having read the book, I was deeply desirous of seeing the movie. My curiosity was deep. I had trouble finding it but I chanced a look on UTube and by golly there it was. It was free through Vault and I kept expecting the movie would be interrupted asking for money or a membership. But it played on till the end. A delightful surprise. I had seen it about 15 years ago but couldn't remember much. It was made in 1988 and starred Kristin Scott Thomas as Brenda and after reading (and listening) to the book, I had a hard time seeing her in that role. But she did great. She was wholly divine as a woman. She might have been a goddess in another movie.  She spoke at rapid speed and was able to pass herself as a conniving, dishonest woman and wife but maintaining a sweet demeanor in the doing which was totally effective. The character she played was not divine.  James Wilby was in it. Angelica Huston had a small but effective role. There was a secondary character played by an actor named Pip Torrens. He's been around for awhile mostly doing British TV and may not be known in the USA. He is normally seen with no hair (bald) but in the movie he was only 28,  had dark hair with mustache and beard and was as handsome as you can get. Not tall, dark, and handsome; more of a sophisticate. If I were a woman, oh man. He had a Oliver Reed sort of look but with less striking features. Oliver Reed could break you two with his Popeye arms, but Mr Torrens thrills you with his silent look and glance and if you wanted to know enticing and interesting stories, he would give them to you. The last half hour of the movie was anticlimactic (to me anyway) and my interest started to flag. Of course I knew what was coming and that made it worse. I said in my previous post above that ending of the story was very choppy in the end and the movie was all the worse. It was as if that last half hour, some other movie had started interrupting the flow of what going on before that.

///

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2020 at 6:55 PM, laffite said:

Preparing a Zoom event to discuss A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh. The story is hilarious. The blurbs say that this author was quite satirical but this one introduced a serious tone to his oeuvre. The trouble is that you have to get serious about to discern it properly.  And it doesn't help not being English. The narrator of the audiobook has Brenda speaking in a little girl voice that makes one think of Marie Wilson and Gracie Allen, although these two are much to nice to be a Brenda. Brenda is given a wildly satirical line that is almost unbelievable, thus wild. I won't explain it in detail but it has something to do with her young son and her illicit lover having the same Christian name. She makes an egregious blunder, only it turned out not be a blunder, she really meant it. Her true character hinging on a Freudian slip. Oh, Brenda, woe is you! It has to be considered satirical because it is highly unlikely that anyone on the earth could have actually said such a thing and really mean it.  The ending of the novel is a real tour de force but was disappointing to learn that it was a transfigured short story already written singly to stand alone that was tacked onto the novel. Ugh. A later printing included an alternate ending that was, IMO, much more appropriate to the story although it's quite bland in comparison to the tacked on version. But I like it better. I think I will be in the minority about that at the meeting. Anyone else read this? I never get a reply when I ask that, but ...

I have not read this, but as a HARDCORE ANGLO-LIT-FREAK, I was looking for something new, so I checked out BRIDESHEAD REVISITED and made it to page ninety before I gave up. Something about the lead character having a butler in college made it a story I could not relate to.

I also will note that I DO NOT GET WHAT THE **** THE MOVIE THE LOVED ONE (1964) IS ALL ABOUT (ALFIE.) NOT SAYING IT'S BAD, JUST THAT I DON'T GET IT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this is wild,

OIP.lDq0Dc-Un2Ucfl5pZqQHxgHaLh?pid=Api&r

that copy of THE MONSTER CLUB by R CHETWYND HANES ended up coming after all and I have been devouring it.

many of you know i am a big fan of the 1980 HORROR ANTHOLOGY FILM (one of the last of the GREAT BRITISH HORROR ANTHOLOGIES) THE MONSTER CLUB.

A REFRESHER:

 

the 3-SEGMENT film was kinda sorta based on the story collection THE MONSTER CLUB- which is comprised of FIVE SHORT STORIES all told within the setting of a sort of BRITISH SOCIAL CLUB for VAMPIRES, GHOULS and WEREWOLVES and the (extensive) results of their interbreeding the species (hybrids known as Vamgoos, and werevamps and some downright LEWIS CARROLL-like nomenclature- SHADDIES, RADDIES and MOCKS.)

The first of the stories THE VAMPIRE AND THE WEREWOLF was wonderful and should have been included in the film, i have thought about it and it occurred to me it probably was not because the make-up was not in the budget. nonetheless, it is like reading a THOMAS HARDY story about a werewolf and a vampire struggling to find a place in a harsh and judgmental world.

the story of THE HUMGOO was the one that inspired the film's most memorable segment- LOUGHVILLE or the VILLAGE OF THE GHOULS- it was also outstanding and while the version in the film has haunted me since seeing it as a child, i have say the story was even sicker and more involving (the ghouls actually bury the guy to let "the meat age" and he has to claw his way out!!!!)

CHETWYND HAYES was a very good writer- LOVECRAFT with a sense of whimsy and a real understanding of character- and  a little on the  Dickensy side with some slightly lurid undertones- but he has a delicious sense of humor which the film adaptation, as DEAR to me as it is, just does not capture. Some of his descriptions are breathtaking.

I would recommend any of you who enjoy horror fiction to seek him out (his work is on KINDLE, which I hate, so I paid $20 for this paper edition, but it was worth it.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to thank another member for showing me this thread.

On my recent read or re-read list:  Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (laugh-out-loud funnY0

Call It Sleep (Henry Roth)

Going through four later novels (Library of America) by Ross MacDonald aka Kenneth Millar.

Loved that someone is reading the 87th Precinct (Evan Hunter - Blackboard jungle) by Ed M.

Read the latest in series about Three Pines by Louise Penny (sp?). New book due in fall.

About to start Peculiar Crimes Unit by Christopher Fowler (supernatural mystery)

The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins)

The Night Watchman

Before We Were Yours

The Giver of Stars

 

I love reading (and I still receive our local paper plus the NY Times - a lot of reading material there).

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/7/2020 at 4:59 PM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I want to thank another member for showing me this thread.

On my recent read or re-read list:  Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (laugh-out-loud funnY0

Call It Sleep (Henry Roth)

Going through four later novels (Library of America) by Ross MacDonald aka Kenneth Millar.

Loved that someone is reading the 87th Precinct (Evan Hunter - Blackboard jungle) by Ed M.

Read the latest in series about Three Pines by Louise Penny (sp?). New book due in fall.

About to start Peculiar Crimes Unit by Christopher Fowler (supernatural mystery)

The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins)

The Night Watchman

Before We Were Yours

The Giver of Stars

 

I love reading (and I still receive our local paper plus the NY Times - a lot of reading material there).

chaya, I hope you don't mind my asking, but are you Canadian?   I ask because Louise Penny, as you know, is a Canadian writer  (Quebec).  I actually really enjoy her Armande Gamache character -- and have you noticed, her characters are always eating?  Really delicious sounding food, too !

The other reason I thought you might be Canadian is, in another thread you mention the musician Robbie Robertson.  Except for Levon Helm  (and Ronnie Hawkins), The Band were a Canadian group.  Just wondering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

misswonderly3, I'm definitely not a Canadian.  I was born in Baltimore and came to Buffalo area when I was an infant.  My parents are both native New Yorkers (Mom's the Bronx and Dad was Brooklyn, however, he was raised in the Bronx).  Living in Buffalo area, I've had access to Canadian television.  I don't remember how I became a Band devotee.  I discovered Louise Penny via my local library.  Personally, I like reading about various cultures, races, cities, etc.  Being Jewish, I tend (recently) to read books written by or involving Jewish life.  

I also like reading about bookstores, libraries, etc.  Read Robbie Robertson's memoir (I recommend it - he is such a good storyteller).

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

misswonderly3, I'm definitely not a Canadian.  I was born in Baltimore and came to Buffalo area when I was an infant.  My parents are both native New Yorkers (Mom's the Bronx and Dad was Brooklyn, however, he was raised in the Bronx).  Living in Buffalo area, I've had access to Canadian television.  I don't remember how I became a Band devotee.  I discovered Louise Penny via my local library.  Personally, I like reading about various cultures, races, cities, etc.  Being Jewish, I tend (recently) to read books written by or involving Jewish life.  

I also like reading about bookstores, libraries, etc.  Read Robbie Robertson's memoir (I recommend it - he is such a good storyteller).

 

Thanks for getting back to me on that, chaya.  You certainly know a bit about some aspects of Canadian culture-- I guess, as you explain, because you lived near the Canadian border.

You know, I've always kind of wanted to visit Buffalo. I know people make fun of it (or used to, anyway), but I've heard it's got some pretty cool things -- I've read about its bars and restaurants and I think it has some kind of museum??

As for Robbie's memoir ( entitled "Testimony"), yes, I've heard it's really entertaining.  I do own a copy (well, my husband does) so can read it anytime. Maybe now's as good a time as any !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I live in a suburb.  We have several museums.  We have some great architecture (both Louis Sullivan and his student, Frank Lloyd Wright).  The Albright Knox is a great gallery (not the Met in NYC) and we have a good Science Museum.  Niagara Falls used to be better when I was a child because it wasn't so "built-up."  Seeing the Falls (either from Canada or Niagara/U.S. side) all lighted up is wonderful.  I even saw the Falls when it was shut off years and years ago.  Across the border, there is the Stratford Festival and Toronto about 2 hours away, and just across the border are Niagara on the Lake (Shaw Festival - great place to walk around) and Fort Erie.

As you probably know, we had the Pan Am Expo up here (where McKinley was assassinated).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/27/2010 at 4:22 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Ok, summer's almost over. It's a time that, correctly or not, is often associated with people catching up on their reading. Not necessarily "beach" reading, either (which I associate with rubbish -I can't even read on a beach, the sun bothers me too much.)

I don't read anywhere near as much as I used to, but for some reason, as soon as LATE SUMMER begins, I GET THE URGE TO READ.

When it comes to Literature- I have two favorite genres- 19TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE and 20TH CENTURY "PULP FICTION"- and of those genres, two of my favorite favorite writers are THOMAS HARDY and JIM THOMPSON- who (in the oddest way) I see as literary relations of a sort...one thing that the two have in common is that, out of all my favorite authors, they both have the longest and most diverse catalogues of work- it's worth noting that while both have written novels that I would without reservation cite as AMONG THE BEST I HAVE EVER READ, both also have books that have disappointed me greatly.

and both still have a few titles in their ouevre that I have yet to read.

on that note, I read HEED THE THUNDER by JIM THOMPSON,

See the source imagethe first edition cover

Which I have avoided because it was one of his early works and because it is ostensibly not about CRIME...nonetheless, I really liked it an awful lot and would rate it just behind THE GRIFTERS, THE TRANSGRESSORS and THE KILLER INSIDE ME as his best works. It is a very clever, engaging novel- hilarious at times and, at others, a downright HORROR STORY (there is a scene at the end that is incredible. It evoked WUTHERING HEIGHTS (its portrayal of the cause of effect of events which may seem minor is excellent) and AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY and its story of a NEBRASKA FAMILY in turn of the century America rung clear as a bell in 2020. I would really, really highly recommend it with the caveat that it takes a little while to get going and it is, at times, a challenge to remember who is who. it is worth noting that i read the BLACK LIZARD/VINTAGE CRIME edition which, and this is one of the few bones I have to pick with them, gives it a very innacurate write-up on the back cover, making it seem like something that is a very small part of the story is in fact the nexus of the tale (they do this with their back cover write up of THE GRIFTERS too)

I then read THE WELL-BELOVED by THOMAS HARDY, which has set on my shelf for 10 years or so.

51dP-SBC1-L.jpgLovely cover. has NOTHING to do with the story tho.

 

I really want to go see PORTLAND on the ENGLISH COAST now, it sounds LOVELY (HARDY often invented the settings of his novels, even though they are set in ENGLAND, the names are fictitious)- in this case, he used a real location. Perfect summer read, and an eerily apt companion to HEED THE THUNDER, another tale (slender by HARDY standards at 158 pages) of the twists and turns of fate and occurance, a chain of events is set in place by a love affair abruptly ended due to the fickle whims of a young man, and his contact with the the descendants of the woman he spurned over the next 40 years. this one could also be adapted, the theme is surprisingly current, you could absolutely set it in the present day- and it comes quite close to being a brilliant GHOST STORY. also highly recommended.  for some reason the edition i read (the one in the picture) reprints the serialized version of the story after the original version, which makes the whole edition about 300 pages, seems kinda like a waste of paper to me since they are both the same story, but at least it's well-annotated [as all editions of THOMAS HARDY MUST BE!]

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished reading John Steinbeck's Sweet Thursday - again.

I've read every one of Steinbeck's books in the course of my life - a few of them, like Sweet Thursday, - multiple times. Unlike his serious novels, it's a romantic comedy - a sequel to his comic novel Cannery Row.

A delightful, poignant read. Doc falls for Suzy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Jim Thompson on my to-read list.  Love both Hardy and Steinbeck and read almost everything I could get my hands on.  There was an article in my local paper that said good readers make good writers.  As an English Major/English teacher/tutor, I think Steinbeck has an incredible sense of setting.  So does Thomas Hardy.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latest film book I'm looking at is a  tribute to Bonanza.  "Bonanza - A Viewers Guide - blah blah blah. "  From 1996 I think.  It's actually not bad.  A good reference for the show and good lord a decent look into why Pernell Roberts went stale. Or he wanted to get out. Whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

When it comes to Literature- I have two favorite genres- 19TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE and 20TH CENTURY "PULP FICTION"- and of those genres, two of my favorite favorite writers are THOMAS HARDY and JIM THOMPSON- who (in the oddest way) I see as literary relations of a sort...one thing that the two have in common is that, out of all my favorite authors, they both have the longest and most diverse catalogues of work- it's worth noting that while both have written novels that I would without reservation cite as AMONG THE BEST I HAVE EVER READ, both also have books that have disappointed me greatly.

Let me guess. The one that disappointed you greatly was Jude, the Obscure. We just read that in the book club and it suffered a degree of resistant as to likeability although that didn't deter from a great conversation. It was thought by some to relentlessly depressing. You probably know already that this was his last novel and it was unpopular that he quit writing novels and spend the rest of his life (28 years) writing poetry.

That was a fine post you wrote. I hope you pick up on your reading.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, laffite said:

Let me guess. The one that disappointed you greatly was Jude, the Obscure.

I LITERALLY AT MY DESK JUST NOW  SHOUTED OUT "HOW DID YOU KNOW???!!!!"

Yes, absolutely, head of the nail, may I introduce you to the hammer: you are 100% correct!

And the weird thing is, i went in expecting to love it because I had already read TESS (which I LOVE) and RETURN OF THE NATIVE (which is good)- but JUDE THE OBSCURE is just SO MOROSE! IT WALLOWS IN ITS SORROW and  PILES ON THE TRAGEDY to the point where, as a reader, I was just inured to it by the end.

When it comes to THOMAS HARDY, my favorite book of his (which was also his favorite book of his own) is- without question- THE WOODLANDERS. It is one of the five best books I have ever read and I actually started writing a screenplay based on it a looong time ago that was set in a lumber town in North Carolina in the 1950's. I really, really, really recommend THE WOODLANDERS- stick with it and realize its a challenging read (lots of vernacular and colloquialisms) but it is SO WORTH IT, and make sure no one tells you the ending before you read it,

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I have Jim Thompson on my to-read list.  Love both Hardy and Steinbeck and read almost everything I could get my hands on.  There was an article in my local paper that said good readers make good writers.  As an English Major/English teacher/tutor, I think Steinbeck has an incredible sense of setting.  

He sure loved to write about California. I believe he grew up in Salinas.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I LITERALLY AT MY DESK JUST NOW  SHOUTED OUT "HOW DID YOU KNOW???!!!!"

Yes, absolutely, head of the nail, may I introduce you to the hammer: you are 100% correct!

And the weird thing is, i went in expecting to love it because I had already read TESS (which I LOVE) and RETURN OF THE NATIVE (which is good)- but JUDE THE OBSCURE is just SO MOROSE! IT WALLOWS IN ITS SORROW and  PILES ON THE TRAGEDY to the point where, as a reader, I was just inured to it by the end.

When it comes to THOMAS HARDY, my favorite book of his (which was also his favorite book of his own) is- without question- THE WOODLANDERS. It is one of the five best books I have ever read and I actually started writing a screenplay based on it a looong time ago that was set in a lumber town in North Carolina in the 1950's. I really, really, really recommend THE WOODLANDERS- stick with it and realize its a challenging read (lots of vernacular and colloquialisms) but it is SO WORTH IT, and make sure no one tells you the ending before you read it,

I have The Woodlanders on the shelf. Maybe I'll pick it up. It's an early one, isnt't it? I liked TESS and THE MAYOR OF CASTERBRIDGE a lot. I tried RETURN OF THE NATIVE and really struggled with it. I didn't get through it.  If you're into television adaptations, try Casterbride (2003) which is great. The actor Ciaran Hinds is brilliant as Michael Henchard. He was born to play that role. There is an earlier one (1978) with the great Alan Bates as Henchard but I didn't take to it. I have a TV adaptation of Tess made in 2008, four episodes. It's probably in my mailbox right now.

Thanks for the preview of Woodlanders. You got me curious.

I AM the Hammer. Bam!

//

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...