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Somewhat Off-Topic: What have you been reading lately?


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On 8/3/2020 at 8:15 PM, hamradio said:

Just got the book "This Film is Dangerous - A Celebration of Nitrate Film".  

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Glance through it so far, a lot to read.  Goodness did got my money's worth ($68.00) it's large  11 X 7 3/4 X 1 1/2 inches (same my ARRL Radio Handbooks).

Did a spit take when I got to the chapter on page 527. :lol:

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Looks like a seriously interesting book!  Nitrate prints look just amazing.  Nothing else touches them for clarity and contrast.

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, laffite said:

A fair and (very) sober reply.

Just goes to show that rapid consumption of three White Russians is no bar to cognition.

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51 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Just goes to show that rapid consumption of three White Russians is no bar to cognition.

Careful. It's that fourth one that gets you.

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On 6/15/2020 at 4:25 PM, SansFin said:

I have been reminded of: The Diagram Prize which is an annual award given by a British trade journal for booksellers. Past winners include:

Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Nude Mice, University of Tokyo Press

The Joy of Chickens by Dennis Nolan

Oral Sadism and the Vegetarian Personality by Glenn C. Ellenbogen

People Who Don't Know They're Dead: How They Attach Themselves to Unsuspecting Bystanders and What to Do About It by Gary Leon Hill

Strangers Have the Best Candy by Margaret Meps Schulte

 

I thought that I might add this book to my reading list. The review has given me second thoughts.

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Reminds me of the book mentioned in "Unforgiven"...The Duck of Death.

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Excellent thread, Wonderly.  As a TCM fan and also a book lover, I can thank the late Robert Osborne (and maybe Eddie Muller today) for increasing my interest in books about movies).

Currently, I'm about half way through W. K. Stratton's book The Wild Bunch, which is the story of how the film was developed along with being sort of a mini-bio of the film's director, Sam Peckinpah.  I didn't have much backstory on Peckinpah, and the book has filled in some interesting details.  The movie came along at just the right time given the trend in Hollywood for more realism (including violence) as evidenced by the success of Bonnie and Clyde, and westerns that appealed to the "boomer" generation, such as Butch Cassidy and the Sun Dance Kid.  Good read - I recommend it.

Also into Don Graham's Giant:  Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean, Edna Ferber and the Making of A Legendary American Film.    Not that far into it, but apparently Ferber had some heartburn about the deviations of the film from the novel.  For instance, the famous fight scene where Hudson's character confronts the "racist" Anglo restaurant owner, "Sarge," never occurred in the book.  This was George Stevens's idea.  Not that I mind personally (since I am from Virginia), but the book had Hudson's character, Bick, going to east to buy horses, and that is where he meets Leslie (Liz Taylor's character).   Virginia is the actual filming locale, but the book placed the horse farm in Maryland, so that was what was reflected in the film.

I'll maybe update as I get further through the book !

Again, good thread !☺️   

 

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5 hours ago, laffite said:

Careful. It's that fourth one that gets you.

I can't speak for other's experiences, but I've never had any trouble with the fourth. :)

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

I can't speak for other's experiences, but I've never had any trouble with the fourth. :)

Careful, it's that fifth one that gets you.

;)

🍸

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I didn't scroll through this entire thread so my apologies if someone else mentioned this book. I just finished FURIOUS HOURS by Casey Cep. It's a fascinating book and a must read for fans of Harper Lee. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD has always been one of my favorite novels and I loved the movie as well.  FURIOUS HOURS explores the mysteries surrounding Ms. Lee and offers some explanations as to why there was never a second novel.  It's by far the best thing I've read in years. 

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12 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I can't speak for other's experiences, but I've never had any trouble with the fourth. :)

Well, if FOUR doesn't get the taste out of your mouth....  ;) 

Sepiatone

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16 hours ago, laffite said:

Careful, it's that fifth one that gets you.

;)

🍸

I would consider stopping at half a dozen. 

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, if FOUR doesn't get the taste out of your mouth....  ;) 

Sepiatone

They're tasty. Too bad McDonalds doesn't serve alcohol. Just imagine a milkshake

made up of White Russians. Yum. To be consumed only at home of course.

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

So.....

I take it maybe you're NOT familiar with the old joke.....?  ;) 

Sepiatone

I guess not, though I have a general idea of where it's going. :)

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I have just now finished reading three books:

Pepper&Carrot: The Potion of Flight by David Revoy

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff

You Don't Want a Dragon! by Ame Dyckman

These are unfortunately going into a box of gifts for a certain fuzzy's great-granddaughter's birthday. I shall miss them. 😞

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Y'know, since getting my new specs I'm catching up on my annual "re-reads".   I'm currently 2/3s through Gary Paulsen's  WINTERDANCE.

Sepiatone

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On 4/21/2021 at 10:44 PM, Moe Howard said:

Now, Gone With the Wind. 

Please post your impressions here. Curious to hear your take on it. I had read it when I was about 25 and found it fascinating. Mitchell was a good writer, I was never bored with the story. 

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On 4/21/2021 at 10:44 PM, Moe Howard said:

The Godfather, Portnoy's Complaint, A Time for Mercy (Grisham), Deadly Cross (Patterson) what a slog to get through that. Now, Gone With the Wind. 

I read A TIME FOR MERCY last month. It is really good. I enjoyed getting to know Jake Brigance again. There's talk about a movie with Matthew McConaughey playing the role one more time. Apparently there's a third book featuring Brigance. It's named SYCAMORE ROW. I hope to read it soon. 

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23 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

SYCAMORE ROW

Indeed there is . Not quite up to par with the new one, but interesting.  Agree on A Time for Mercy, very good read. I'm avid Grisham reader, have all his books and a few of his recent offerings have been surprising off. 

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Please post your impressions here. Curious to hear your take on it. I had read it when I was about 25 and found it fascinating. Mitchell was a good writer, I was never bored with the story. 

Will do. I'm only in the 4th chapter so far and I'm surprised how much I'm enjoying it. The back story on Gerald O'Hara and how Tara came to be, the scoop on the neighbors, all good stuff so far.

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On 4/23/2021 at 4:33 AM, TikiSoo said:

Please post your impressions here. Curious to hear your take on it. I had read it when I was about 25 and found it fascinating. Mitchell was a good writer, I was never bored with the story. 

Finished Gone With the Wind yesterday. It's the longest book I've ever read and probably the best. Also bought a Blu-Ray copy and rewatched the movie just for comparisons sake.

There's so much to unpack and much of it has been covered so I'll stick with a couple of my main takeaways. 

First, I'm surprised just how far off much of the negative commentary is. I expected at least a half dozen superfluous whippings. In over one thousand pages there's a total of three mentions of "whipping" in the book. One referenced past tense when the stableboy put Gerald's (Scarlet's father) prize horse away "wet".  There isn't any further description so severity is a question.  The second and third both have Prissy on the receiving end and one of these was administered by her mother, the other is a single whack with a stick. Prissy is the Giligan of this story and an anchor around a drowning person's neck, I would have personally left this idiot by the side of the road.

Second surprise is how historically accurate the reconstruction period is dealt with from the Southern perspective. Mitchell's family had lived through this period so saw much of this first hand. Her father was an Attorney and a Historian so she had the benefit of not only his records but first hand accounts from family members. It's small wonder so many don't want this side of the story told. It really should be required middle/high school reading as a counter to standard American History texts which recount this period from a sugarcoated Northern perspective.

 

 

 

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Just finished Georges Simenon's The Pitards and am 100 pages into Bukowski's The People Look Like Flowers At Last.   Fan of both authors, but this collection of peotry by Bukowski is probably my favorites so far of his posthumous collections.

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On 4/16/2021 at 4:37 AM, TikiSoo said:

In McKays, $35 buys $100 worth of books.

I resurrected this thread because it can be about ANYTHING Hollywood related reading, not just biographies.

I just finished Richard Barrios' book DANGEROUS RHYTHM WHY MOVIE MUSICALS MATTER

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And while I love Barrios, this book is a mess. He spends more time crafting snarky sentences trying to be funny that come across as elitist and rude than actually having a point. His thoughts jump from musical to musical without any explanation of why they're mentioned or their impact on viewers. I feel really badly, because Barrios is an authority on this genre but doesn't bother explaining anything in this book-not even a different angle-it just comes across as a long, disjointed diatribe.

So, I've just received THE SEARCHERS, MAKING OF AN AMERICAN LEGEND by Glen Frankel from my library. It was recommended by a fellow TCM board member. I can already tell by the first paragraph this is going to be a well written, well organized narrative filled with researched historical facts-NO OPINION thank you. 

(note: I have never seen the movie, but will after reading this-I'll know when to close my eyes)

I hate it when authors interject their own snarky commentary in lieu of providing actual information.  I didn't even finish Jeanine Basinger's The Star Machine, because I could not handle anymore of her snotty, crappy comments about some of the stars she discusses.  The book was so disjointed and in desperate need of editing.  She didn't give me any extra insight into the "star machine."  Supposedly Basinger is one of the leading film historians, but she is nowhere near someone like RO or Leonard Maltin's level.

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I am about halfway through Barbara Payton's memoir, I Am Not Ashamed.  I hope to finish it by the end of next week so I can return it to my friend when I visit.  I like how the book is written, it's written in a very conversational tone.  I can just picture a worn out, haggard, probably drunk, Barbara Payton telling someone her life story while they transcribe her words.  This book is fantastic and also very bittersweet as this woman could have probably had a good career had she made some better choices.  Perhaps if she'd spent more time with Franchot Tone and less time with Tom Neal... 

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