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rover27

The 'colorization' of TCM

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> {quote:title=C.Bogle wrote:}{quote}

> So your theory is that Wendi Deng is using her position to suppress the

> dissemination of the Charlie Chan film series, and doing it as an agent of a

> foreign country (China), but not its government? Huh?

 

It?s not my ?theory?. clore posted the article from the New York Daily News that said Wendi Murdoch was the main person responsible for keeping Charlie Chan movies off of television.

 

Basic news reports reveal she is strongly nationalistic and trying to promote her own country, which is modern China. It doesn?t matter what political group or party is in office in her country at the present time. She?s promoting the country, not the politics of the country.

 

Her interest in suppressing Charlie Chan movies is to get rid of what she thinks of as old ?stereotype? movies that appear to show Chinese people being subservient to Europeans, but she misses the whole point about Charlie Chan, since he is actually superior to the Europeans he has to deal with in the old movies.

 

Modern millionaire Chinese film makers should not be allowed to suppress our classic old American films, certainly not in our own country. We Americans certainly don?t try to suppress old Chinese films, either in the US or in China. Kurosawa never tried to suppress old American films. Fellini never tried to do it. Fran?ois Truffaut never did it.

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I'm not sure how this thread totally shifted gears to become a discussion of Charlie Chan, but I'm digging it and thanks to everyone for your insightful comments! I love the character and the films!

 

In fact, I'm watching CHARLIE CHAN'S SECRET right now from the Fox box set, and it's totally cool! I'm tempted to purchase all 5 of the Fox sets....sitting here contemplating...it will be a sacrifice, but one I think is worth it! I have this one (Set 3) and the Set 5 already...so 3 more to go! I think I'll go with at least one of the Oland sets, the one with the earlier films, they are so cool!

 

I'm gonna hold off on the Monogram's for a little bit, though I love them, they are clearly of lesser quality overall, and with money is tight, have to choose! Will get them all eventually though!

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My bad. It wasn't your theory, it was a seven year old supposition from the Daily News,

which isn't definite on who or what caused the Charlie Chan festival to be canceled. If

Wendi was so set on making sure that Chan movies didn't appear on TV, one wonders

why it was ever scheduled in the first place, and also why Fox released the movies on

DVD. Well, there's been only one party in China since 1949, and that will probably hold

true for the immediate future. The evidence for Wendi's suppressing the films is rather

weak in general. I'm sure she has other things to do than trying to make sure that no one

sees seventy year old Charlie Chan films.

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Mark,

 

There are several book reviews on Google News for the new Charlie Chan book: ?Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History?, by Yunte Huang.

 

http://news.google.com/news/search?aq=f&pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=charlie+chan

 

Here is an interesting interview from NPR:

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129424778

?Huang has a theory about why the Chinese embraced the faux-Chinese Chan. "I grew up in China, and I used to watch a lot of Chinese operas," he explains. "And it is a very common thing in Chinese opera to do these kind of ventriloquism, or to have cross-dressing, for instance. So performing 'the other' ? that kind of imitation ? is always part of ... artistic culture of China."?

 

Here is an audio interview with the author:

 

http://www.npr.org/player/v2/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t=1&islist=false&id=129424778&m=129693133

 

Maybe TCM can save Charlie Chan by having this book author on as a guest programmer, to introduce some of the best of the early Chan films.

 

Or, if TCM can?t get the rights to show the films and Fox refuses to show them, perhaps Mr. Osborne could discuss this problem with the book author in an interview session on TCM. This would generate some national publicity that might help get the Chan films back in circulation on TV. Mr. Osborne could do this as a half-hour program, or he could do it as a type of episode such as the ?letterbox? explanation, one that could be repeated from time to time.

 

As far as I can tell, TCM is the only channel on all of cable television that stands up in support of the NON-censorship of all classic American films.

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Fred, that's a GREAT idea, to help get Chan re-introduced on TV! I love it!!! And fully support it! Thank you for those informative links and for the suggestion!!! Let's hope that TCM might take it up!

 

At the very least, let's see if we can get the Monogram Chan's to appear, some of which used to show up on the schedule from time to time!

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*Maybe TCM can save Charlie Chan by having this book author on as a guest programmer, to introduce some of the best of the early Chan films.*

 

*Or, if TCM can?t get the rights to show the films and Fox refuses to show them, perhaps Mr. Osborne could discuss this problem with the book author in an interview session on TCM. This would generate some national publicity that might help get the Chan films back in circulation on TV. Mr. Osborne could do this as a half-hour program, or he could do it as a type of episode such as the ?letterbox? explanation, one that could be repeated from time to time.*

 

*As far as I can tell, TCM is the only channel on all of cable television that stands up in support of the NON-censorship of all classic American films.*

 

Dobbsy,

 

This is the best idea to come out of this thread. It's a terrific idea. I hope the powers that be at TCM give it serious thought and find a way to do it.

 

Thanks for thinking of it!

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Mark, lzcutter,

 

Thanks.

 

I think it was a very interesting point made by the book author, Yunte Huang, when he said that it was common in China (and probably still is) for different genders and kinds of people to play other kinds of people in classic Chinese theater. For example, in the Chinese play shown in ?Lady from Shanghai?, all the actors are men, including the ones playing the roles of ladies. I think this was also a tradition in Japan. Huang says that?s why Chinese movie-goers accepted an anglo playing Chan in the movies of the 1930s.

 

I?ve never seen a classical Chinese or Japanese play, but friends of mine have, in San Francisco, and they told me about how the characters are usually all male and very exaggerated. So the Chan films went over well in China in the ?30s and ?40s. They are still available on DVD in China:

 

http://www.dvd.com.cn/movie/1990.html

 

http://wen.namizu.cn/info_112578.html

 

The real Charlie Chan:

http://www.sanfranciscosentinel.com/?p=83978

(scroll way down the page)

 

http://www.sanfranciscosentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/the-real-charlie-chan.jpg

 

Charlie Chan advertisement, the Grand Theater, Shanghai, 1935:

http://charliechanfamily.tripod.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/egyad.jpg

 

Charlie Chan stamp, Isle of Guernsey:

http://www.trussel.com/detfic/guernsey.htm

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"By my count, TCM is showing 380 features this month. I've broken them down by decades and percentages.

 

1920's - 8...... (2%)

1930's - 44...... (12%)

1940's - 93...... (24%)

1950's - 135...... (35%)

1960's - 74...... (20%)

1970's - 23...... (6%)

1980's - 3...... (1%)

1990's - 0

2000's - 0"

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

That's an interesting count from Sept., 2010. I found a schedule from August, 2000. I broke down only the 30s, 40s, and 50s. Here's what I found:

 

1930s-18%

1940s-30%

1950s-25%

 

If this is typical of 2010 vs. 2000, you see TCM showing less movies from the 30s(6% less of the schedule), less from the 40s(6% less), and more from the 50s(10% more). The total % of movies pre-1960 is about the same, low 70%, but significantly more from the 50s(more color movies) and less from the 30s and 40s.

 

In 2000, as a % of the TCM schedule, there were 12% more movies from the 30s and 40s than 2010(36% vs. 48%). And in 2000, there were 10% less movies from the 50s(25% vs. 35%).

 

In 2000, movies from the 30s & 40s made up almost half the schedule, in 2010 they made up just over 1/3. While movies from the 50s made up 1/4 of the schedule in 2000 and increased to over 1/3 of the schedule in 2010.

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