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[i]Out there is a world outside of Yonkers[/i]


hlywdkjk
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Where Buster Keaton lives again in a robot...and his name is *WALL-E*

 

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Buster Keaton is reincarnated into the mechanical apparatus known as *WALL-E* which is playing tonight on the Disney Channel. (8pm)

For those on the West Coast, you still have a few minutes until the start of the film. But it appears the film will reprise tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon at 3pm both Eastern and Pacific times again on The Disney Channel. (Yes. That means commercials.)

 

If you are open-minded, enjoy visual story-telling and don't recoil from Jerry Herman songs, give *WALL-E* a look. The first 45 (wonderfully "silent") minutes should leave you with a grin on your face more than once.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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I like "Wall-E" very much, I recorded it on DVD+RW when it played on Starz. I don't understand the Buster Keaton connection though, it reminds me more of the Number 5 robot from the movie "Short Circuit" for the fact both robots developed self awareness.

 

The Eva robot is a nice design, very unique "love" story.

 

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What do you like the best, Number 5 or Wall-E? Like Wall-E because he likes "Hello Dolly"? :)

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Most of the recent movies I like are animation. It may be because they follow traditional storytelling techniques. It strikes me that good animation needs to make watchers identify with something which is not human and so does much more towards characterization than live-action movies do. Wall-E is defintely a character! :) I am chuckling now because I remember frustration of little brush robot trying to clean up after Wall-E. I will have to watch this movie tomorrow.

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*" I don't understand the Buster Keaton connection though, it reminds me more of the Number 5 robot from the movie "Short Circuit" for the fact both robots developed self awareness."* - hamradio

 

Though my Keaton reference is meant to be a "spiritual" comparison more than a physical one, I can't help but "see" a similarity in their appearance.

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Stone-faced Keaton and a faceless robot have a lot in common. They both express themselves in a more physical manner. (Though the robot does have the advantage of sound effects that were not available to Buster.)

 

*"What do you like the best, Number 5 or Wall-E?"*

 

I've not seen *Short Circuit* so it isn't a reference for me. But I see Keaton (and Chaplin) throughout *WALL-E*.

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*"Like Wall-E because he likes "Hello Dolly"?"*

 

I like the story of *WALL-E* because the character likes *Hello Dolly*. The audaciousness of the opening sequence with its use of the music and lyric from *Hello Dolly* is so unexpected that one who "gets it" can't help but be won over. And its because it is *Hello Dolly* and not *Singin' In The Rain* or *Swing Time* that makes the homage even more inspired and the audience's response even more pleasurable.

 

Let's face it. The film version of *Hello Dolly* is rather disposable as a permanent record of the the musical. But it's a "keeper" to our "hero". For WALL-E, the film is a source of entertainment and a diversion from the drudgery of his solitary, day-to-day experience. It is also his manual of inter-personal relationships and the demonstration that there is more to one's existence than just work. As another character says in the film, "I don't want to exist. I want to live!" Everyone should escape from their own personal Yonkers now and then vowing that "We won't come home until we kiss a girl." (or boy, as the case may be.)

 

Or, for our hero, at least hold their "hands".

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

ps - "kudos" to The Disney Channel for showing the film letterboxed. Not a bad trade-off for the commercials.

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Sep 18, 2010 11:20 AM

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I have seen *Short Circuit* (1986) only once. It was part of mindbend. Esso had me watch it and then watch *High Art* (1998) to see Ally Sheedy as naive greenie and then as junkie lesbian artiste.

 

Is MO's name a play on Omnibot 17mu? -I am sorry I do not know how to put Greek letter into post but mu is English version of Greek letter used in name.- MO does not look like Omnibot 17mu but there is similarity to Omnibot 5402 as if it could be ancestor before species evolved very high foreheads:

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I saw connection between Wall-E and Buster Keaton. Sad eyes and fidgety hands. Always seeming to be out of place. I can believe Buster Keaton was part of inspiration and protomodel for robot.

 

I loved contrast between Wall-E and Eve. He is mechanical, shabby and very self-conscious. She is sleek and clean, confident and somewhat magical. One feels they could take apart Wall-E and understand every part but one can only marvel at Eve. It is very stereotypical but it is how many men feel about themselves and it is how many women want to be seen by men.

 

hlywdkjk - it is not safe to include only part of poem. When I saw your caption I immediately thought of:

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled. Now I'm living on nuts and berries, and if the park rangers don't find me soon, I'm a goner." I found your reference very funny and apt but I had to pull my mind back to original poem.

 

What I find amazing about good animation is use of body language to great effect. I have read that 95% of human communication is through body language to enhance or replace words. I could feel MO's frustration by posture and narrowing of eyes. In picture posted by HamRadio we see Wall-E's wistfulness while Eve giggles. It is so perfectly clear he is in love without saying a word. Such things have not been seen to such great extent in movies since silents.

 

I think Wall-E might become classic movie as opposed to cult classic in future. Things that make it less than perfect for me are that I find songs grating on my nerves after short while and I find Fred Willard very irritating and too smarmy. I know that is why he was cast for part but it is far too much of 'good thing'.

 

Edited by: SansFin on Sep 18, 2010 6:43 PM

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Please don't compare M-O with the Omnibot, LOL!!! I played around with one back in the 1980's where I work. They try to sell the only one they had and its nothing but a remote controlled toy. It uses a cassette recorder to record the commands you previously sent to the Omnibot to duplicate later. It has no actual computer inside, as far as a robot goes, its a piece of junk. At amost $500.00 a ripoff! You see one on the end titles of the movie "Short Circuit".

 

Here is the earlier one they had

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Heathkit use to sell the Hero series robots during the same time period which were true computer code programable, the most complex was the Hero 2000. Had several CPU's inside! That kit would have been a challange to build (would had took MONTHS if not over a year!)

 

robot.jpg

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I saw it when it first came to video and it hooked my heart right from "Out there..." And that made me rewatch "Hello, Dolly." Now Dolly has never been a great film, but I have watched it at least half a dozen times since then. Going from "Out there..." to "Put On Your Sunday Clothes" is just marvelous entertainment.

 

And so is Wall-E, the robot with a heart.

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*"I loved contrast between Wall-E and Eve. He is mechanical, shabby and very self-conscious. She is sleek and clean, confident and somewhat magical. One feels they could take apart Wall-E and understand every part but one can only marvel at Eve."* - SansFin

 

You're very right. "WALL-E" is a Sony Walkman cassette player. "EVE" is an Apple I-pod mp3 player. In fact, I read yesterday that an Apple designer was involved with creating "EVE"s look.

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*"hlywdkjk - it is not safe to include only part of poem."*

 

Sorry you got sidetracked. The important thing is that you arrived at the right reference in the end. And that you got a laugh out of it.

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*"Such things have not been seen to such great extent in movies since silents."*

 

And that is the perhap the most admirable trait of *WALL-E* - that the first half of the film is not only unashamed at being a "silent" movie but celebrates it. To release a film in the 21st century with no dialogue for 45 minutes is a very daring choice and I can't help but applaud those responsible for taking that risk.

 

*"I think Wall-E might become a classic movie as opposed to cult classic in future."*

 

Definitely. And "A Brighter Future" at that!

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(All artwork by artist Eric Tan)

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> I saw it when it first came to video and it hooked my heart right from "Out there..." And that made me rewatch "Hello, Dolly." Now Dolly has never been a great film, but I have watched it at least half a dozen times since then.

 

I think *Hello, Dolly!* is a great film. It's just a poorly cast great film. Even poorly cast, it is impressive cinema!

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> "WALL-E" is a Sony Walkman cassette player. "EVE" is an Apple I-pod mp3 player.

 

Your comparison is apt and balanced. I once experienced something unbalanced but more like what I feel when I see Wall-E and Eve together. We were spending our mornings learning to do simple repairs and replace accessories on diesel engines so we would not need as many mechanics in the field. We were spending our afternoons as guinea pigs for environment testing of heads up display. Because data to be shown in working model was classified and because lead technician was bit of a flake we were shown clips from animated movies.

 

Any typical day I would be wrestling with heavy and grimy hydraulic pump and a few hours later watched dragons sweeping above the treetops.

 

> *"Such things have not been seen to such great extent in movies since silents."*

>

> And that is the perhap the most admirable trait of *WALL-E* - that the first half of the film is not only unashamed at being a "silent" movie but celebrates it. To release a film in the 21st century with no dialogue for 45 minutes is a very daring choice and I can't help but applaud those responsible for taking that risk.

 

It was so well done I doubt many watchers noticed lack of dialogue. That is proof you can do anything if you do it perfectly. :)

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