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From Broadway to Hollywood


cujas

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Bobby Connolly was an excellent and prolific choreographer.

 

But my guy had 3 landmark musicals because 2 of his films won the Oscar for best picture and both of them are in the top 20 AFI Musicals list. The 3rd outstanding film he choreographed was groundbreaking in film dance but only won 1 Oscar, eventhough it was nominated for 5 altogether.

 

Hint: this choreographer won the Oscar for Best Dance Direction for one of the above cited films.

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Before they were called choreographers, they were known as dance directors. I believe you are referring to Seymour Felix, who was the dance director for "The Great Ziegfeld" and "Yankee Doodle Dandy", as well as many other movies and stage shows.

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Yes, only 3 choreographers received the coveted Oscar for Dance Direction--

 

Astaire's Asst--Hermes Pan

Astaire's 1st RKO Choreographer--Dave Gould

And Seymour Felix, who was Cagney's Asst on "Yankee Doodle".

 

Seymour's 3rd landmark musical was *Cover Girl*--where he assisted Gene Kelly.

 

Well Miles, That's Dancin, your turn--

 

Edited by: cujas on Aug 11, 2011 3:39 PM

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Thanks. What led me to the correct name was just luck. I was browsing through some DVD's at a store and I stopped to read the notes on the back of "The Great Ziegfeld". It mentioned Seymour Felix and I immediately thought of Cujas' question.

Now, there was a well known Broadway musical that was transferred to the screen only a few years after it's initial run. It featured a classic dance number that helped advance the plot. Later, the dance was done in a movie with Gene Kelly, but in this version, the male lead was not known as a dancer, but rather as a versatile actor who was in a few musicals. He would later become famous for a TV sitcom. The female dancer was a ballet star who would later marry a leading figure in the ballet world. The movie is unusual because it is a musical with lots of dancing, but nobody sings. The original Broadway show helped to make a dancing star it's male lead, but he was not in the movie version. He was, however, in a movie with dance direction by Seymour Felix. Now, if you're not too confused, can you name the Broadway show and the classic musical number that I referred to?

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Yes, the original Broadway show made a star of Ray Bolger, who was in the movie "The Great Ziegfeld". Eddie Albert's leading lady was Vera Zorina, who married George Balanchine. The number was originally written with Fred Asatire in mind, but he turned it down. The movie version of "On Your Toes" only used a small portion of the music from the Broadway show. Your up next, skipper.

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This song by a very famous composer was first introduced in a Broadway musical in 1939. The show starred one of the cast members of "The Wizard of Oz". When the musical was made into a movie of the same title and featuring a redhead four years later, the song was deleted. However, seventeen years after the song first appeared on Broadway, it was included at the last minute in a movie made in the 50s so the lead singer/actors can have a song together, thereby producing the most popular version of the song...This later film was a musical remake of an earlier non-musical Oscar-winning film...Finally, in 2004, the song appeared again in a biopic movie about the composer's life...

 

Questions: 1) Name the song, the original Broadway show, and the star from "The Wizard of Oz"...

2) Who was the redhead in the movie version?

3) Name the 1950's musical and its two singers.

4) What was the title of the earlier Oscar-winning film, and who won the Best-Actor?

5) What was the title of the biopic from 2004 ?

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Aug 13, 2011 10:54 PM

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Has this topic been posted before? It seems very familiar to me. Well, here are the answers in the order you asked for.

 

1 The song is Cole Porter's "Well, Did You Evah?" from "DuBarry Was a Lady" that starred Bert Lahr and Ethel Merman

2 There were two redheads in the movie, Red Skelton and Lucille Ball

3 The 1956 musical was "High Society". The song was a duet for Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra. You remember "What a swelegant, elegant party this is!"

4 The original movie was "The Philadelphia Story", which won an Oscar for James Stewart, Saturday's featured star on TCM.

5 The 2004 biopic of Cole Porter was "De-Lovely", and it starred Kevin Kline. In the 40's, a whitewashed biopic of Porter was made. It was called "Night And Day". It starred Cary Grant.

 

Curiously, a few years earlier, James Stewart had actually been in a musical. It was called "Born To Dance" and it co-starred Eleanor Powell. Stewart sang the hit song "Easy To Love" which, of course, was written by Cole Porter.

 

 

 

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Thanks. The question was so familiar to me that the only real research that I did was to confirm that Bert Lahr was in the Broadway show.

There was another Cole Porter show on Broadway that starred Ethel Merman. When the movie version was made, Ethel was not in it, but Red Skelton and another actor from the movie version of "DuBarry Was A Lady" were in it. When the show ran on Broadway, it featured three other female musical performers who had, at that time, not made it big in movies, but that would soon change.

 

Can you name:

 

1. The name of the other show

2. The female star of the movie

3. The other actor with Red Skelton who was in the movie versions of both "DuBarry Was A Lady" and the other show

4. The three women from the other Broadway show who would soon become movie stars

 

Parts of this question may have been previously posted, but, after the last question, it seemed like a good time to bring it up again.

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1. "Panama Hattie"

2. Ann Sothern replaced Ethel Merman for the movie version

3. Rags Ragland was in the movie versions of "Du Barry Was A Lady" and "Panama Hattie" with Red Skelton

4. June Allyson, Vera Ellen, and Betsy Blair,who married Gene Kelly, were the dancers. Also among the dancers were Lucille Bremer and Constance Dowling.

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The cast of this Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway play included a future Oscar winner who was not in the movie version....Another member of the cast was in a 1940 revival of another play on which a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical was based...Still another member was in the movie "The Madwoman of Chaillot"...

 

1) What is the title of the first play and who was the Oscar winner?

2) What is the title of the play on which the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical was based?

3) Who were the other two cast members?

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We sometimes forget that Rodgers and Hammerstein produced non-musical plays, in addition to their well known stage musicals. In this case the play is "I Remember Mama", which was based on a short story called "Mama's Bank Account". It opened in 1944 and featured future Oscar winner Marlon Brando as Nils. A movie version was made in 1948 and a TV series was done in the 1950's. In the cast of the play was Joan Tetzel, who had been in the 1940 revival of "Liliom,", the story that RH used as the basis for their musical "Carousel". Also in the cast of "I Remember Mama" was Oscar Homolka. He was the only original cast member to be in the movie version. Later, he was in the movie, "The Madwoman Of Chaillot" along with another RH favorite, Yul Brynner.

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Very good, Miles....Also, Oscar Homolka married Joan Tetzel a few years after the play opened on Broadway....I'm surprised none of the stars won the Oscar although four were nominated. Irene Dunne was perfect for the role that Greta Garbo turned down....Your thread, Miles...

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Thanks. Tennessee Williams had many plays adapted to the big screen. What was the first of his plays to be made into a movie and who played the principal leads in the film? That's the easy part of this post. Here's the part that only a real trivia buff would know. In the movie there is some backgound music in the score that was a well known song written by George and Ira Gershwin some years earlier. It had been introduced on Broadway by one of the female leads in the movie. Can you name the song and the Broadway show that it first appeared in?

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The first of Tennessee Williams' plays adapted for the Screen was "The Glass Menagarie"(1950), starring Gertrude Lawrence in her only successful movie role, as an aging Southern Belle with a dreamer son, Tom (Kirk Douglas), and a crippled daughter, Laura(Jane Wyman)...

 

In the scene in which Laura helps her brother Tom get into bed, ["Someone to Watch Over Me"|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Someone_to_Watch_Over_Me_%28song%29|Someone to Watch Over Me (song)] is used as the [underscore|http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Underscore_%28music%29&action=edit&redlink=1|Underscore (music) (page does not exist)]. The song, written by [George|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gershwin|George Gershwin] and [ira Gershwin|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Gershwin|Ira Gershwin], was introduced by Gertrude Lawrence in the Broadway show [Oh, Kay!|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh,_Kay%21|Oh, Kay!] in 1926.....

 

h2.

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Well Skipper, I guess we'll give you a little leeway since you were posting in the middle of the night. The son was played by Arthur Kennedy. Kirk Douglas played the gentleman caller. You also left out the name of the song that Gertrude Lawrence had introduced in the show "Oh, Kay", but the other information was correct. Maybe you could tell us what that song was and then pose the next question. Good job. I really thought that someone would guess "A Streetcar Named Desire", but that movie was made a year later.

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*"Someone to Watch Over Me"* is a song composed by [George Gershwin|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gershwin|George Gershwin] with lyrics by [ira Gershwin|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Gershwin|Ira Gershwin] from the musical [Oh, Kay!|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh,_Kay%21|Oh, Kay!] (1926), where it was introduced by [Gertrude Lawrence|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_Lawrence|Gertrude Lawrence].

 

 

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