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Who Steals The Show?


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Think of a Star that was billed third,fourth,etc but Steals The Show.

When The Daltons Rode(Broderick Crawford)Bob Dalton.Believe or not is billed Fifth.

Santa Fe Trail(Raymond Massey)as John Brown.

Beau Geste(Brian Donlevy takes the show as SGT Markoff)

Joan Of Paris(Alan Ladd as shot up RAF flyer Baby.Many think this was his best Performance.I know he made better films,Shane,This Gun For Hire,etc)

The Sun Also Rises(Errol Flynn)

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Completely agree about Errol stealing SUN ALSO RISES. By comparison, Ty Power is sleepwalking through his part in that picture!

 

Recently, I posted about ADVENTURE. Greer and Clark are fabulous as is to be expected but third-billed Joan Blondell is on fire in that one and Thomas Mitchell, fourth-billed, is superb. This is probably the best example of a film where the second-tier actors are as strong if not stronger than the leads, and Greer Garson and Clark Gable are about as big as you can get in 1945. It's a dream cast, expertly played by all.

 

Meanwhile, Martha Raye reaches a career highpoint in Chaplin's MONSIEUR VERDOUX. She totally steals the film from him. Fortunately, he was smart to just surrender and hand it over to her. It makes both of them look good.

 

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Actress Laraine Day was in some 1938-?39 low-budget Westerns and was billed as Laraine Johnson. The main cowboy stars are often people we?ve long forgotten, but Day is so beautiful and her acting is so good, she always stands out.

 

See her in several early Western films on TCM on the morning of Oct. 13, as Laraine Johnson.

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I agree about Van Heflin in JOHNNY EAGER. That is one of the most-deserved Oscar wins in history. Great exploration of character, great technique, and he proves that he should be given his own pictures (which is what MGM did shortly thereafter).

 

Another one worth mentioning as a classic scene stealer is W.C. Fields. He is probably the only older actor who is able to snatch a picture away from a beloved child star. In this case the kid that gets robbed is Freddie Bartholomew and the picture is DAVID COPPERFIELD.

 

MrMicawber.jpg

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William Powell steals the show in Libeled Lady. In retrospect, he's the 4th biggest star in the film, but has all the best moments.

 

Also, Nicholson steals the show in Reds. His brooding portrayal of Eugene O'Neill was the best thing about the film, and left me wanting to see more. Unfortunately, the film isn't about him, so he's written off about midway through.

 

How about Edward G. Robinson in both Double Indemnity and Key Largo?

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Thelma Ritter in just about anything. She even manages to sweep a few scenes out from under Bette Davis in All About Eve.

 

I think Stage Fright was supposed to be Jane Wyman's movie, but everytime she's on screen with Marlene Dietrich she sort of disappears...

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I agree, she is another superb character actor that steal movies from the stars. I loved her in The Mating Season (particularly when she and Miriam Hopkins are going at it) and The Model and the Marriage Broker.

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Jo Van Fleet . . . She did it twice! The first film she stole, rock-solid was "East of Eden" in 1955. The second time came in 1960 with her role in "Wild River." Despite never having had a major career of sorts, she was always highly respected by those who came to work with her. She truly was one of the most overlooked actresses of her time, in terms of the amount of work she was able to receive. As skillful as Jo was she never felt so comfortable in motion pictures, preferring the "live stage' and for its time even "live television." Without any question, Jo was one of the greatest "method actresses" of her generation. In later years, she was sought by many aspiring performers as a teacher and coach.

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Alan Hale in almost any scene he plays with Errol Flynn.

 

As for MONSIEUR VERDOUX, Chaplin was very shrewd in this regard. After his genius casting of Jack Oakie as Napoloni in THE GREAT DICTATOR, Chaplin found that putting a broad comic in counterpoint to his more elegant antics worked extremely well. It gave Chaplin's character to be completely frustrated and befuddled - something the tramp himself usually inflicted upon others. These two casting strokes increased my respect for Chaplin immeasurably because it demonstrated his lack of insecurity or jealousy when it came to getting laughs (and, to paraphrase Harry Antrim in MIRACLE ON 34th STREET, consequently he got more laughs than ever before!!).

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> {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> Thelma Ritter in just about anything. She even manages to sweep a few scenes out from under Bette Davis in All About Eve.

>

 

I respect Thelma so much because of her ability to steal the scene without having to overact and chew scenery. Any other actress performing her dialogue in her roles would fall under the radar.

 

Una O'Connor also had away of stealing scenes. She was hilarious in *It All Came True* in the scenes in the kitchen when the night club had finally opened up.

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> {quote:title=LoveFilmNoir wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> > Thelma Ritter in just about anything. She even manages to sweep a few scenes out from under Bette Davis in All About Eve.

> >

>

> I respect Thelma so much because of her ability to steal the scene without having to overact and chew scenery. Any other actress performing her dialogue in her roles would fall under the radar.

>

> Una O'Connor also had away of stealing scenes. She was hilarious in *It All Came True* in the scenes in the kitchen when the night club had finally opened up.

 

Oh man. Una! I forgot about her. Hilarious as Janet the housekeeper/companion in Witness for the Prosecution.

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