Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
yanceycravat

Old Time Radio goes to the Movies

Recommended Posts

Anyone else want to see a special programming tribute to Radio Shows and stars that showed up in the movies?

 

TCM could use these to start -

 

Paramount BIG BROADCAST FILMS

RKO Fibber Mcgee and Molly - Kay Kyser - Gildersleeve

Columbia Whistler and I Love a Mystery...

 

What others can you name?

 

Yancey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a list of movie stars that had radio appearances.

http://www.radioarchives.com/Famous_Guest_Stars_Old_Time_Radio_Shows_p/2016.htm

 

Movies that had radio shows as the plot, "Poor Little Rich Girl" (1936) and "The Singing Kid" (1936) starring Al Jolson.

 

I like to add that the last radio show I've ever heard was the Mystery Theatre during the mid 1970's. I think it was between 1050 - 1150 KHZ. I listened to it every evening on a AM/SW National Technical Schools superhet I built. Probually the best 5 tuber I've ever encountered.

 

Young people don't realize that radio has something movies don't - allowing the listener to use their imagination to allow the programming to be interpeted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dick Tracy

Flash Gordon { with Gale Gordon, from the Lucy show} as Flash in 1935

Mr. Moto with Peter Lorre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The INNER SANCTUM series.

Several films with Fibber mcGee and Molly (HEAVENLY DAYS is the only one I can recall ofhand).

Fred Allen was primarily a radio personality (I can't recall if he started in vaudeville, but I think he was most famous for his radio show). His IT'S IN THE BAG (a version of The Twelve Chairs) is very funny.

And there's a Crime Club film set in a radio station (sorry, my memory...)

Red Skelton is a radio detective in the WHISTLING FILMS...

Bob Hope is a radio personality in GHOST BREAKERS...

Gene Autry had to keep breaking off battling with the denizens of Murania to do his broadcast in PHANTOM EMPIRE...

Clifton Webb has a regular broadcast in LAURA as does Monty Wooley in THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see some of the radio stars in the movies. I have seen It's In the Bag with Fred Allen and the movie with Fibber and Molly with Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy. It would be interesting to those who have no clue as to what radio was like before TV. It would be fun to watch Fibber, Molly, and Fred do their thing, again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE GREAT AMERICAN BROADCAST (albeit a 20th Century-Fox film) with Alice Faye.

 

Another Temple film, aside from the already mentioned PLRG, REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM, has Shirley as a soon-to-be radio star. (Also 20th Century-Fox).

 

Apropos to nothing -- I'm a great fan of the source music that blasts out of those old radios in 1930s movies.

 

-Arch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you mention Bergen & McCarthy... where did they get their start? I know they had a very successful radio show, but weren't they in the movies prior to that? And before...? vaudeville...? Ziegfeld Follies...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harrylong, I know Bergen and Charlie were on radio and I assume they must have been in vaudeville, but you know what they say when you assume. When I think about it I believe the only film I have seen them in is the one with Fibber and Molly. Of course, Edgar was in I Remember Mama with out Charlie, and did a very good job, I think. I enjoyed Edgar Bergen and Charlie, Mortimer and Effie when they were on early TV. Ahh, I miss those good old days when talented people preformed on radio and TV and made a film or two. We would laugh or cry, whatever the occasion called for, or learned the lesson the program was trying to convey. The next morning we would get up and live our lives able to face reality. I will quit now, I am getting preachy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little off topic but referring to listening to the old radio shows, is anyone here old enough to remember the *Magic Eye* that was used in the old radios? Even today I think these indicators are so cool especially in the dark.

 

um11a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*Harrylong, I know Bergen and Charlie were on radio and I assume they must have been in vaudeville, but you know what they say when you assume. When I think about it I believe the only film I have seen them in is the one with Fibber and Molly.*

It's strange enough contemplating a ventriloquist act being successful on radio (I meam, think about it!), but that they came to success that way really stretches my credulity. Vaudeville of Ziegfeld Follies type shows are the only venues I can think of for specialty acts coming to prominence back then.

And if you've never seen Edgar & Charlie in their film with WC Fields, YOU CAN'T CHEAT AN HONEST MAN, you really must track it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bergen and McCarthy did several films. Beside W.C. Fields "You Can't Cheat an Honest Man", they did "The Goldwyn Follies", "Look Who's Laughing" "Fun and Fancy Free". They last appeared in "The Muppet Movie" in 1979, Bergen died soon after filming it. He also appeared without Charlie in a few films, most noteably in "I Remember Mama" for George Stevens...

 

Charlie was a ladies man, always in a tux and top hat. Charlie got away with a lot of double entrendres on radio because he was a dummy and made a lot of jokes about sex. A real dummy about town...Mortimer was a hayseed, he just fell off the pumpkin wagon, innocent and not very bright..Effie Klinker was a man hungry old maid...

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Oct 22, 2010 2:27 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm rather fond of CHARLIE McCARTHY, DETECTIVE, which may be the only film "they" headlined.

There's also a somewhat strange post-Laemmle Universal film called LETTER OF INTRODUCTION in which, if I recall correctly, Charlie ends up going steady with Eve Arden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mortimer was created in 1938. He was the complete opposite of Charlie. Dressed in a suit that looked like he bought it 2nd or 3rd or 4th hand, buck toothed, very shy, innocent, not a ladies man {dummy } He became ALMOST as popular as Charlie. I know Charlie resides in the Smithsonian Institution in D.C. Their radio show ran from 1937 to 1956 and had almost every major star in Hollywood as a guest, from Gary Cooper to Orson Welles. In 1938 Mae West guested and did a skit called "Adam and Eve". It caused such an uproar that she was banned from radio for over a decade....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred--I grew up watching Paul Winchell, just thought he was so talented. It was years before I realized his dummys were a rip-off on Bergen's.

 

Knuckle-head Smith was so much like Mortimer Snerd, Bergen should have sued.

 

What was the story on that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess Bergen wasn't to concerned over Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney . Jerry was more of a smart alack and didn't have the class of Charlie. So I really don't seen a problem with Jerry, but Knucklehead Smiff was a lot like Mortimes Snerd, but like I said , it didn't seem to bother Edgar. I remember Paul Winchell very well growing up, he lived in the same neighbor hood as we did for a while in Forest Hills, N.Y.

Winchell was an inventor and helt a patent for an artificial heart. But there is some conterversary about just when he invented it with Dr Henry Heimlich [ yes of that maneuver ] plus over 30 other patients.I really don't think Bergen considered him a big threat..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help thinking of the "Twilight Zone" episode with Cliff Robertson in which the dummy turned real and turned the tables on Cliff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the 1978 film "Magic" with Anthony Hopkins and Ann Margaret, directed bt Richard Attenbrough and written by William Goldman. It follows the same lines as the Twilight Zone episode. The story goes that Hopkins was allowed to take the dummy home to work with it. He called in the middle of the night, freaked out, and was threating to throw it into the canyon if someone didn't come and get it out of his house. Attenbrough came over and took it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This idea was used in a 1940s British film which TCM aired about a year ago. The film contained several ghost type stories. In fact, each episode looked like a Twilight Zone episode, so I figure Rod Serling must have seen the film years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what about the 1958 Jack Benny TV show episode where Jack comes to visit Bergen only to find that McCarthy and Snerd are real "people." This was a pretty spooky episode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> Could one of you ventrilomavens distinguish for me the personas of Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd?

 

 

Charlie was a sharp-tongued wiseacre, and Mortimer was dumb and ignorant.

 

Addendum: probably best characterization is to say Snerd was a simpleton.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Oct 24, 2010 12:30 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...