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Strangest Movie Experience


wouldbestar
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How about the strangest experience you have ever had at the movies?

 

Mine came in late 95 or early 96. I won a free pass and decided to see the Disney animated film, Balto. I had heard it was based on a true story and even though I knew it would be less than factual the clips I?d seen intrigued me.

 

I went to the theater on a week night thinking to escape the kids. Would you believe I was the only one in the ?box? the whole time and I wasn?t even a paying customer? I was surprised they even ran it. That?s never happened to me before or since. The other films playing seemed to do a bit better.

 

I understand the film was a flop and am sorry as I thought there was a great message in the film and Steve Winwood theme for bi-racial kids who are made to feel they don?t belong anywhere. I saw a piece on History about the real race to bring the serum to Nome and that there is a stature to Balto in New York. It was a good history lesson for kids and this adult.

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Many years ago I attended a screening of the classic film Sunrise at the Museum of Modern Art. It starred Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. I turned around in my seat before the pitcture started and sure enough two rows behind me sat Janet Gaynor herself. I recognized her but she put her finger to her lips and asked I not mention it to anybody. Respecting her wishes I turned back to watch the film. After it was over I turned back and saw that she had gone.

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One of my very best friends in High School, was one of ten children and had a fairly hard life. She always said "Nothing ever makes me cry". We were sitting at the movie "Last Time I Saw Paris". The Elizabeth Taylor character dies and I hear this loud sobbing. It was my friend, First and last time, I ever saw her cry and we are still friends.

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My father was concierge for large hotel for foreign visitors. He asked a guest from a town I was to visit to write a letter for me to concierge of hotel I would be staying at there. Letter was only to ask to send me places nicer than usual tourist-traps. Concierge was really nice rather than guest-nice towards me. I thought it may be that he had daughter and he wished to treat me as he wanted her treated in strange city. He always had most wonderful recommendations for places where there were no tourists. It was not until much later that I learned the guest who wrote the letter to him worked for that country's ambassador and he had used the ambassador's personal stationery.

 

Concierge sent note to my room to say I could see new movie if I could leave at once. A friend and I went to lobby and concierge introduced us to a couple who would take us. We did not speak their language and they did not speak ours but they seemed happy to let us ride with them in their limousine.

 

It was night and I could see very little but portico made me think it was side entrance of large and very old hotel. Lobby was all velvet and heavy gilding. It looked very much like they had not changed style since 17th Century. No one asked for money or tickets. The only refreshment stand was a counter where we could chose which kind of champagne to have before movie started. Usher gave us seats away from people who had given us ride. Theater was strange because it had so many aisles it cut rows into sets of four seats together. There were eight other people in theater.

 

Before movie started a man with a cart like a stewardess uses made drinks for us. After short films lights came on and man came to freshen our drinks and other man with cart brought us choice of nibbles. All through movie empty glass or plate was quietly replaced with full one. It was American movie in English and there was separate little screen showing slides with subtitles in two languages.

 

When movie was over we went into the lobby. The other people started going through doors to other part of building. We wondered if we should follow them. A bell boy from my hotel came in with note from concierge that we should go with him. A limousine was waiting to take us back to hotel.

 

Two days later we were on tour of city. Friend who had gone with me to movie asked guide to turn down a street because she thought she recognized something. It was very different in daylight and there was many trees and bushes in the way but it was plain to see it was same portico at side of building. We had seen a movie in the president's palace!

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> But I'm dying to know...what movie did you see there?

 

I am sorry to say I do not remember. I think it may have been a Western as I remember thinking it was not movie appropriate to that setting.

 

The first time I saw *Holiday Inn* (1942) it was shown on side of a barn. They were playing movies for us because it was so hot no one could sleep. We watched many winter movies that week. :)

 

At one place I was stationed there was standing order to show one movie every week. There were no rooms with wide enough flat wall space to make it bigger than watching television. Technician rigged up mirrors to show movie on the ceiling of hanger. We had to lay on our backs and movie was curved and backwards but it was very much fun. It made science fiction movies much more scary.

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Now, on the other end of the scale of movie going experiences, I think my strangest was when I was about 7. Part of a friend's birthday party consisted of taking us to a theater for two films. One was *World Without End,*, and the second is a better-remembered 50's sci fi film, *Attack of the Crab Monsters*. AotCM was pretty scary to a 7 year old. Well, the kid behind me 'enhanced' that scare, by grabbing the back of my neck, and squeezing, every time a giant crab came on the screen!

 

By far my strangest movie watching experience happened at home. I had just driven home, about 80 miles, from my mother's funeral. We have no relatives in this part of the country, so I was alone, and as you might imagine, rather despondent. I decided to try an take my mind off things by watching a movie. I decided on *Treasure of the Sierra Madre*, because, to me, the film is about what has real value in life. I had seen the film many times before, but there was something I had never noticed. The film starts in 1925, the year my mother was born, The poster for the lottery says that the drawing was on Feb. 14th. It seems to me that it is now the day after, or Feb. 15th, 1925. That is when my mother was born.

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Several years ago I was in the auditiorium of the Nelson-Atkins Art Museum watching a screening of *LONG DAYS JOURNEY INTO NIGHT.* Every time Katharine Hepburn's character spoke, an elderly woman sitting about 10 rows in front of me would begin chuckling and speaking jibberish in a Katharine Hepburn accent. This went on for about 45 minutes! Finally, a large man got out of his seat and walked over to the seat where the disruptive lady was sitting. He stood over her until he got her attention, and yelled, "KNOCK IT OFF!" Then, he turned around and went back to his seat. For the remaining two hours of the movie, the humbled lady continued her routine of chuckling and mimicking, but in a whisper.

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It wasn't me, honest! But, it does remind me of something.

 

Back in the early 80s, I went to a campus film group showing of *The Rocky Horror Picture Show*, because Kenneth Anger's short film *Invocation of My Demon Brother* was being shown before it. The crowd was very noisy, as you would expect for *TRHPS*. They stayed noisy when Anger's film started. I'm a pretty big guy, and I always sit front row center. I stood up, my back to the audience, and yelled, at the top of my lungs, "Shut up, you a*holes, this is the film I came to see!" Well, it got very quiet, and stayed pretty low, while Anger's film played, then they cut loose when *TRHPS* started.

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Thank you, Sprocket Man, for correcting me about Balto. The right people should be given credit as I still think it was a much better movie than it was considered to be. Eating crow will have to wait until tomorrow as I'm an old-fashioned Catholic who doesn't eat meat on Friday.

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> I just had a strange experience and don't have to be there in the flesh. I just watched my local news and saw full grown *adults* camped outside the Pullman Square Cinemas in Huntington, West Virginia for the recent Harry Potter movie. People 30 going on 7.

 

 

It amazes me how many adults revere these books. I Googled Harry Potter once a while back and wow. There are hundreds of sites out there, created by adults, who spend as much time analyzing and discussing the books and movies as people spend on the classics on these boards. Unbelieveable.

 

I have to say, I liked the books and some of the movies, and yep, I am proud to admit it. I have never gone to the extreme of camping out or even seeing the film at midnight (though I did pick up the final book at midnight and read it straight through ;) ) And I am seeing the movie tomorrow. At the matinee , which makes me a little less pathetic, right? LOL

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*I just watched my local news and saw full grown adults camped outside the Pullman Square Cinemas in Huntington, West Virginia for the recent Harry Potter movie. People 30 going on 7.*

 

I'm not camping out but I do plan to go see it next weekend.

 

I really enjoyed the books and am looking forward to this one and Part 2 next summer.

 

And I am mid-century modern. Hardly a youngster.

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On a sweltering summer day in 1968, still in my teens, I went to the Criterion Theater in Manhattan to see *Rosemary's Baby*. Part-way through the film, during the anagram scene, someone screamed something that was unintelligible, but it caused the audience to rush out of the theater in terror. Many people left; after a bit of a wait and no explanations, the rest of us went back to watch the movie. Someone said they thought someone had shouted "the balcony is falling," but I never found out what really caused that panic.

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I like very much the Harry Potter books and movies. I will not read last book until I can also be watching it on DVD. That will mean waiting until second part is released. I find it very interesting to read while watching movie and this will be my very first time to do it when I have not read book or seen movie before.

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Swithin wrote:

<< Someone said they thought someone had shouted "the balcony is falling," but I never found out what really caused that panic >>

 

Lol, he's at it again?

 

chickenlittle.jpg

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

About Harry Potter, maybe this is a sign I am simply getting too *old!* :)

 

fibhol1906.jpg

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Sometimes I feel I could write a small book about my movie-going experiences, from the grand road show events, to the many neighborhood theaters, to the strange happenings. I wouldn't know how to begin to answer the question posed in this thread, but I've been enjoying thinking about it.

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tracey, I love children's books and have read many of them as an adult. I think any person who loves to read and who appreciates good literature recognizes that good writing is good writing, and believe me, there are many books for children and teens that are better-written, more insightful, and tell a better story than a lot of "adult" fiction. The Harry Potter series fall into that category.

 

I remember receiving a huge shipment of Harry Potter books a few years ago, when I worked in a book store. I was kind of chagrined -no, annoyed - to see that there were two editions of the same Harry Potter title (doesn't matter which one, since the publisher did it for all of them), The exact same book, same text word for word, but with a different cover, the "adult" edition, was shelved in the adult fiction section of the store, and the " children's" edtion of course shelved in the children's section (actually, there was a children's and a teen's section, so the HP books were kept in three different places in the store.)

 

My point is, it's silly that the publisher felt they had to issue the HP titiles in an "adult" edtion so that adults who wanted to read it supposedly wouldn't be embarrassed to be seen reading a Harry Potter books. The books are great, no need to feel funny reading them. As I said, there's more philosophy, character development, and good writing in the Harry Potter series than in a great many books for adults.

 

Whenever I read children's or teen's fiction, I'm proud of it. I select my reading material carefully, whatever its intended market may be (God , that sounds snooty, sorry) and if I'm reading a kids' book , I'm reading it because I think it's just as valid as an adult book.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> tracey, I love children's books and have read many of them as an adult. I think any person who loves to read and who appreciates good literature recognizes that good writing is good writing, and believe me, there are many books for children and teens that are better-written, more insightful, and tell a better story than a lot of "adult" fiction. The Harry Potter series fall into that category.

>

> I remember receiving a huge shipment of Harry Potter books a few years ago, when I worked in a book store. I was kind of chagrined -no, annoyed - to see that there were two editions of the same Harry Potter title (doesn't matter which one, since the publisher did it for all of them), The exact same book, same text word for word, but with a different cover, the "adult" edition, was shelved in the adult fiction section of the store, and the " children's" edtion of course shelved in the children's section (actually, there was a children's and a teen's section, so the HP books were kept in three different places in the store.)

>

> My point is, it's silly that the publisher felt they had to issue the HP titiles in an "adult" edtion so that adults who wanted to read it supposedly wouldn't be embarrassed to be seen reading a Harry Potter books. The books are great, no need to feel funny reading them. As I said, there's more philosophy, character development, and good writing in the Harry Potter series than in a great many books for adults.

>

> Whenever I read children's or teen's fiction, I'm proud of it. I select my reading material carefully, whatever its intended market may be (God , that sounds snooty, sorry) and if I'm reading a kids' book , I'm reading it because I think it's just as valid as an adult book.

 

 

I started reading YA fiction to screen books for my daughter, who was just entering her teens at that time and was ready to graduate to more "interesting" (but not TOO interesting) material. She'd read all the HP books to that point and was looking for similar themes and humor. I discovered several good fantasy series and a good humor series that way. People do give you funny looks though, when you buy a kids' book with no apparent kid in tow...

 

I do wonder about those grown-up types who spend hours upon hours analyzing books like Harry Potter. They are entertaining, yes, but there's just not that much there, thematically. There's a lot more to discuss in the Dark Materials trilogy by Phillip Pullman, but they don't seem get the sort of fanatic following the HP books do.

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traceyk65 wrote:

 

"...There's a lot more to discuss in the Dark Materials trilogy by Phillip Pullman, but they don't seem get the sort of fanatic following the HP books do."

 

Good point. I literally could not stop reading the Dark Materials books, I remember neglecting almost everything else (boring stuff -meals, laundry, going to work -well maybe not that last one ! ) while I read all three of these great fantasy books. Incidentally, the publisher ( not the same publisher as the one for the HP books) for the " Golden Compass" series did the same thing - they issued a "young people's'" version, and an "adult" version; same books, different covers.

 

I love The Golden Compass so much that I purposely stayed away from the movie when it came out.And I like Daniel Craig ! But I knew the film, no matter how well done it might be, would not be the same as the story from the book I'd created in my imagination.

 

I guess we're kind of straying from the original topic. I do have a couple of unusual movie experiences, but I think I'll wait on posting them for a bit. I don't want to hog this thread.

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