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Rey, what a great list! I see a lot of my favorites on your list. Beautifully done. you make me want to watch them all again.

 

I am so happy to see *Miracle of Morgan's Creek* on there. Also that *Foreign Correspondent* made it into your favorites. It's one of mine too.

 

I really love the forties, even with the war films. There is a crispness, a rhythm and maybe a little bit of hope and urgency to the films of that period that I really like. With the influence of radio, the sound of a movie and the actor's voices are more important than at any other time I think. Plus they have those marvelous romances and then the later ghost stories. The dramas are more important with the background of war, and the comedies are zanier to get people's minds off of their troubles.

 

Thanks for going to all the trouble of writing up the list, and thinking about each movie individually. It's a tough job, but somebody's got to do it! :D

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OMG, Bronxie, those are great choices for movie jobs! you are making me giggle....

 

I don't know, I'd put governess on the good jobs list if I could have an affair with Charles Boyer.... even if he was mad as a hatter.

 

And I think "movie landlady" is priceless! LOL, you even have the lingo down, " such a gentleman!"

 

I was thinking that Concentration Camp Commandant has got to be one of the worst jobs ever.....

 

and stool pidgeon is a dead end career.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Nov 30, 2011 9:51 PM

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Thanks Wendy!

 

Yes the job is tough, but not as tough as having to deal with others on the message board who evidently can't help themselves from bashing the staff that provides Mr. Osborne with his on-air introductions.

 

I would have assumed everyone would have been thrilled to just have him back where he belongs...... but noooooooooo.

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That's some list. So far there is only one I haven't seen. (Great Man's Lady.) Nothing to disagree with either. It is nice to see "The Talk of The Town" so high on your list. Three of the great and most distinct voices in movies all in the same film, great.

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Well, Rey, I am VERY happy to have RO back where he belongs, I could have danced for joy seeing him there on my TV last night! I think it's an event worth celebrating. You just come here and we'll all give a toast to Mr. Osborne - we'll have our own welcome home party!

 

Joan Crawford gets things started with a twenty one balloon salute to RO-

 

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Some of the guests have already headed straight for the bar.

 

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There will be dancing in the ballroom:

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Even Peter Falk got dressed up to celebrate RO's return:

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Rita shares a toast to RO with Willy Brand:

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Aunt Pitty just heard a rumor that RO is taking more time off:

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William Powell stops to say hello to Ginger Rogers:

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The party is heating up and so are some of the guests.

 

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Whew! SOTM William Powell really gets around!

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Joanna Dru stops partying for a minute and relaxes with a smoke.

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Just as things starts to lag, Sir Lancelot chimes in with some Calypso. Once again, he saves the entire party.

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Woody Van Dyke lets Myrna and Bill know that RO is on his way downstairs.

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Hume is ecstatic!

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RO is arriving! Where's Bill? Oh. I should have known.

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Clara brings out the Welcome Back bouquet.....

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And here is the great man himself! YAAAAAY!

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The party is winding down. Ray Milland and Jean Arthur are exhausted. Too much dancing, I suspect.

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What a wonderful party!

 

I'm so glad you all came. I love you, RO, because you know such lovely people.

 

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Thanks Chris! Eventually I will get to the second half the forties, 1945 ? 1949, hopefully soon.

 

Yes, the film, Great Man's Lady is included on the Universal's Barbara Stanwyck Collection. I had never seen it until I had purchased the set. Once I had seen it, I watched the film several more times.

 

As far as Talk of the Town is concerned, I have always been a big fan of this film. I agree about the three distinct voices. Although, I'd have to say that no one's voice in the film can compete with Coleman's voice which goes down the throat like a glass of smooth, aged whiskey.

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Oh no.....

 

Wendy I did not mean to suggest that I was not glad to see him back, I was merely indicating my frustration with those posters who for one moment can not keep their complaints to themselves.

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Thats okay Wendy.

 

I am sure that there are a lot more than 8.6% of the population unemployed than what was reported earlier today.

 

I usually like coming here and reading what a lot of other posters have to say about movies. But as I said earlier, when I continue to read unwarranted comments those really turn me away.

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I hear you. :)

 

I have a question about your list.

 

You seem to have a really good mix of what Frank might call "male" and "female" films that are your favorites.

 

What exactly are you drawn to in films like Random Harvest and Now Voyager, or Laura ans Since You Went Away, for instance? I know they are great films, but when you watch, what chokes you up, what gets you?

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> You seem to have a really good mix of what Frank might call "male" and "female" films that are your favorites. What exactly are you drawn to in films like Random Harvest and Now Voyager, or Laura ans Since You Went Away, for instance? I know they are great films, but when you watch, what chokes you up, what gets you?

 

Well Wendy, thats an excellent question.

 

Many of the films I have listed on my favorites list fall into two distinct categories:

 

My really, really favorite films and other films that I may have seen a few times, but could be interchanged with other favorite films, especially in years where there seem to be quite a few more films that I could have listed.

 

With Frank, he likes to add as many favorites per year. Some of his years he has more than fifteen films, others even more. With a favorite listing, I like to work a little harder and pick just ten films per year. This way I am really limited in my choices and I have to spend additional time re-watching films again and again just to select my ten.

 

As far as what draws me to certain films?

 

In many instances it is the acting, followed by the writing and how well the actors deliver the written word on screen.

 

Another important criteria is how well the actors seem to work together. This is especially true in Talk of the Town, where the three leads, all very accomplished actors in their own right seem to me not to be "hogging" up the screen time. Now maybe that is the work of the director and or the editor, based in part on what the director wants, but I really do think that to me it is the ensemble acting component that really gets to me.

 

As far as choking up? Well then that is a completely different criteria. And yes I do base some of my selections on pure emotional terms. Those films are really the tear jerkers and even some other action or heavy drama films will choke me up.

 

I have never been one to worry about whether I cry during a film, heck I even get choked up watching those Hallmark commercials on TV, especially this time of year.

 

If you want to know which films from the early forties I have selected makes me choke up I would have to include the following, and their scenes that do it to me:

 

The Talk of the Town 1942

The scene where Professor Nightcap (Coleman) and Leopold (Grant) are sitting by the fireplace playing chess.

The scene where Senator Boyd drops by the house and tells Nightcap the intention by the President to nominate him as a Supreme Court justice. Actually this entire scene, especially after the Senator leaves and the interaction between the three main stars.

The final scene which starts with Tilney (Rex Ingram) is fiddling with Nightcap's robe and Ms Shelley walks in and their conversation about Sweetbrook. Then the final two scenes where we find Leopold and Ms. Shelley witnessing the opening of the court and their close and dear friend Professor Nightcap taking his place on the high bench. And the final scene where Leopold tells Ms. Sheeley that she is going to like it in Washington, but in the end she goes with Leopold.

 

Random Harvest 1942

As far as Harvest is concerned, the emotional scenes that really get to me all occur after Smithy (Coleman) loses his memory a second time while on a visit to Liverpool. Here his accident with a taxi causes him to remember his life as Charles Rainier and his other life as Smithy is pushed away forever.

The scenes with Charles later on while he is the industrialist and Paula (Garson) becomes his secretary are really what gets the emotions going. This part of the film is all about emotions: hidden or real emotions that either are forced to the surface or hidden deep down in the recesses of the mind. The final few minutes of the film is the moment when the tears take over. Rainier after settling a strike at the local mill slowly begins to remember the town he once was imprisoned in as a patient. as he walks through the streets he is reminded of his past and all he wants to do is get back to those days. Finding the cottage he once shared with Paula, he finally realizes what purpose the key he has held onto all the years really was for. And soon after he is reunited with his long lost love.

 

As far as films with strong male and female characters are concerned, as I wrote earlier, those films are chosen not so much based on the strength of the characters as they are based on the writing and acting ability of the actors involved.

 

If I had to choose performances based on strength of character then the following would have to be included:

 

 

The Sea Hawk

Errol Flynn

 

Abe Lincoln in Illinois

Raymond Massey

 

The Grapes of Wrath

Henry Fonda

 

The Letter

Bette Davis

 

 

Ball of Fire

Barbara Stanwyck

 

The Maltese Falcon

Humphrey Bogart

 

The Lady Eve

Barbara Stanwyck

 

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles

 

Sergeant York

Gary Cooper

 

The Talk of the Town

Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, Ronald Coleman

 

Random Harvest

Ronald Coleman, Greer Garson

 

Casablanca

Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman

 

Yankee Doodle Dandy

James Cagney

 

Pride of the Yankees

Gary Cooper

 

Now, Voyager

Bette Davis

 

Shadow of a Doubt

Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten

 

Destination Tokyo

Cary Grant

 

Sahara

Humphrey Bogart

 

The Ox-Bow Incident

Henry Fonda

 

So Proudly We Hail

Claudette Colbert

 

Double Indemnity

Barbara Stanwyck

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*With Frank, he likes to add as many favorites per year. Some of his years he has more than fifteen films, others even more. With a favorite listing, I like to work a little harder and pick just ten films per year. This way I am really limited in my choices and I have to spend additional time re-watching films again and again just to select my ten.*

 

Hey! I rank my films in order! So if you just want my top ten, you have that. If you want my top four, you have that.

 

For my 60s list, I included every film I have seen from the decade since I've seen only 100 films. That's why some years were short of ten and others were longer.

 

Now with the 40s, I have seen more than ten films for every year because I've seen 248 films from the decade. I may include every film I've seen for that decade for my list, as well. Ranked in order for year and decade. But I can bold my top ten for you because I do choose just ten. You just have to look at it that way.

 

When things are ranked in order, you are offering up what's been asked. If someone asks you for your ten favorite things and you give 30 and then proceed to say, "in no particular order," you didn't do what was asked. But if you place those 30 in order, you have done what was asked.

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Hey! I rank my films in order! So if you just want my top ten, you have that. If you want my top four, you have that.

 

> For my 60s list, I included every film I have seen from the decade since I've seen only 100 films. That's why some years were short of ten and others were longer.

 

Yes, I know this..... I was just making a generalized comment. I know you place everything in order. Just take a chill pill, okay?

 

> Now with the 40s, I have seen more than ten films for every year because I've seen 248 films from the decade. I may include every film I've seen for that decade for my list, as well. Ranked in order for year and decade. But I can bold my top ten for you because I do choose just ten. You just have to look at it that way.

 

Your lists are fine, no need to change on my account. I am not even sure how many films I have seen from the forties. Quite a few, definitely over 200.

 

> When things are ranked in order, you are offering up what's been asked. If someone asks you for your ten favorite things and you give 30 and then proceed to say, "in no particular order," you didn't do what was asked. But if you place those 30 in order, you have done what was asked.

 

I have no problem with this. Heck it was you who said I should rank my films. I am attempting to do that just now. It's hard but its also fun.

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Well, Rey, I'm glad you could at least try to convince ol' Frankie that Random Harvest is a purely brilliant film with the kind of deep emotion that everyone needs every once in a while. :D

 

You seem to like the year 1942. That's actually my favorite in film! Have you made a list of films just from that year that have made a difference in your life? I would very much like to see that!

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> Well, Rey, I'm glad you could at least try to convince ol' Frankie that Random Harvest is a purely brilliant film with the kind of deep emotion that everyone needs every once in a while.:D

 

Well Butter, I try my best to convert the man, and what do I get?

More trouble along the way.

I can probably understand his total and utter rejection of the film. But to lay the blame all on Miss Garson is truly unbelievable. I mean who cannot like her character in this film?

 

> You seem to like the year 1942. That's actually my favorite in film! Have you made a list of films just from that year that have made a difference in your life? I would very much like to see that!

 

I don't know if the films made a difference in my life or not except to say that I find some of them to be very emotional for me, to the point where I absolutely cry in certain scenes.

 

I can give you a list of 28 films that I have seen from 1942:

 

Bambi

The Battle of Midway

Captains of the Clouds

Casablanca

Cat People

Flying Tigers

For Me and My Gal

Gentlemen Jim

George Washington Slept Here

The Glass Key

The Great Man's Lady

Holiday Inn

In Which We Serve

Kings Row

The Magnificent Ambersons

The Man Who Came to Dinner

Mrs. Miniver

Now, Voyager

One of Our Aircraft is Missing

The palm Beach Story

Pride of the Yankees

Random Harvest

Reap the Wild Wind

Road to Morocco

The Talk of the Town

To Be or Not To Be

Wake Island

Woman of the Year

Yankee Doodle Dandy

 

Of these, the ones that really have gotten to me over the years are:

 

Mrs. Miniver

Pride of the Yankees

Random Harvest

The Talk of the Town

Wake Island

Yankee Doodle Dandy

 

And the reasons are quite simple really. There is an emotional connect I have made in films like Talk of the Town and Random Harvest that goes along with how the story unfolds and the characters that are involved.

 

In Wake Island and Mrs. Miniver the story centers on two fronts: the war at home and the real war. I remember my uncle telling me stories about Wake Island. He had friends in the Marines he knew at Pearl Harbor who had been stationed there and was quite fond of who never made it back. And Miniver is the quintessential On the Home Front movie with its own set of tormented scenes.

 

The Pride of the Yankees and Yankee Doodle Dandy are crowd pleasers that also offer sad moments to reflect on family and lost ones.

 

Other than these, the others are all fine films including the excellent documentary by John Ford on Midway.

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That Ford documentary is quite amazing, Rey. The footage is so raw, intense and emotional, with images of our soldiers in silhouette, looking like young boys against the sunset, then grimly "doing a job of work" when all you can see is black smoke and fire around them, manning the guns as if it was nothing. It's intensely moving to me.

 

Ford's camera is intimate, close up and very, very personal. There is no getting past the fact that this is hand held impromptu footage of war - first the men just waiting around with big goofy grins on their faces, then rhose same men or boys keeping steady right in the middle of the battle. You are right inside it. The camera is thrown around, knocked to the ground, but still keeps rolling. And then the footage of the aftermath, the wreckage of a hospital, and the showing of men who were in the battle. There is very little narration, just the deafening sound of battle, then the eerie quiet. It's eloquent in what is not said. The pictures definitely tell it all. Some of the footage is strangely beautiful.

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Thanks for your comments!!

 

As far as Johnny Eager is concerned, I just have never been able to sit through that movie all at once. It is a good movie, but one which I did not even include on my 1942 selection list.

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Today I started working on the remainder of the 1940's. 1945 to 1949.

 

Should take me a few days to complete. Writing the commentary for each film is what takes so long. But it does give me time to go back and review certain films. Many of my favorites I own in my library, so re-watching them is as easy as popping a dvd into my mac.

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  • 1 month later...

Fine selections Rey.

 

It is a funny thing about "My Darling Clementine" that with so many wrong historical points that it is still so beloved. With all the other things in other films to be picked on this one gets a pass. But in the end it is more about the characters and the community and it is so well done that the other things are forgiven if not ignored.

 

Never been a fan of "Mildred Pierce" but that has more to do with Joan Crawford than the film in particular.

 

Looking forward to more.

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Very nicely done, Rey! I'm glad to see you resuming your 40s lists. 1946 is definitely one of the best of all-time.

 

What's interesting to me is that we don't share any similar titles for 1945 but five of your titles are in my top ten for 1946.

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