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Susan Hayward 1.25 & 1.26


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There has been plenty for *Susan Hayward* fans to rejoice about lately on TCM schedule. I did not watch any of the films that screened yesterday but I did record them on DVR and will be watching them this weekend. Tonight, she appears in a film based on an Ernest Hemingway story:

 

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*THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO*...One of several Zanuck productions at Fox that borrows from Hemingway. This one is based on what many consider the author's greatest short story. Costars Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner would later appear in THE SUN ALSO RISES, sans Hayward.

 

*THE HONEY POT*...boasts rich production values and on-location filming in Italy. Plus, I like anything with Cliff Robertson. And I whole-heartedly endorse a SUTS tribute for him.

 

*WHERE LOVE HAS GONE*...a sudsy title and a very soapy story, taken from the real-life drama of Lana Turner and her daughter Cheryl. When I checked to see if it had recorded, I found a scene with Bette Davis as Hayward's mother. She seems costumed as if she was leftover from Capra's POCKETFUL OF MIRACLES.

 

*I THANK A FOOL*...I am sure Hayward's character has a lot of people to thank, fools and wise men alike.

 

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*TOP SECRET AFFAIR*...a Warners comedy with Hayward and Kirk Douglas. From the production stills I have seen, Douglas seems to look very much in military uniform as he does in PATHS OF GLORY.

 

*MY FOOLISH HEART*...A routine post-war romance, this time with Hayward and Dana Andrews, working for Sam Goldwyn. I liked these two in CANYON PASSAGE. But as for post-war romances, I am hard-pressed to believe that anything could be better than Jane Wyman and Van Johnson in MIRACLE IN THE RAIN.

 

*STOLEN HOURS*...with a title like this, it cannot be anything but melodramatic. Here's the description from TCM's schedule: "An American heiress with an incurable disease falls in love with her surgeon." Yes, get the tissues ready.

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*THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO...One of several Zanuck productions at Fox that borrows from Hemingway. This one is based on what many consider the author's greatest short story. Costars Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner would later appear in THE SUN ALSO RISES, sans Hayward.*

 

TSOK was known as "The Snows of Zanuck" in some circles, due to the liberties taken on the original short story. Hemingway himself was quoted as saying something along the lines of that he sold Zanuck the rights to that one story, not his collected works. Originally Ava's part had been assigned to Anne Francis, but since Peck's character is supposed to mistake Susan's character for the other woman twice, it was decided an actress who more closely resembled Susan was needed. So Fox borrowed Ava from MGM. They could have used their own Linda Darnell (who resembles Susan much more IMHO), but she was busy filming elsewhere during her last year under contract.

 

Actually, in THE SUN ALSO RISES, Hayward costarred not with Peck, but the actor he replaced as Zanuck's first choice fot the best parts at 20th, Tyrone Power. Also features Errol Flynn, Eddie Albert and Zanuck's current paramour, Juiette Greco. This was his first production as an independent producer, after he resigned as head of Fox.

 

*THE HONEY POT...boasts rich production values and on-location filming in Italy. Plus, I like anything with Cliff Robertson. And I whole-heartedly endorse a SUTS tribute for him.*

 

Plus it reteamed Hayward with Joseph Mankiewicz, some 16 or so years after their first film together, HOUSE OF STRANGERS (1949), although in the early drafts of ALL ABOUT EVE, Mankiewicz initially thought of her as his Margot Channing, until he realized it would have to be played by a woman somewhat older than Susan, then in her early 30s.

 

*WHERE LOVE HAS GONE...a sudsy title and a very soapy story, taken from the real-life drama of Lana Turner and her daughter Cheryl. When I checked to see if it had recorded, I found a scene with Bette Davis as Hayward's mother. She seems costumed as if she was leftover from Capra's POCKETFUL OF MIRACLES.*

 

*I THANK A FOOL...I am sure Hayward's character has a lot of people to thank, fools and wise men alike.*

 

One of her irregular forays into making a movie in the early 1960s, since she was happily married (her second marriage) and semi-retired in rural Georgia. I think playing another suspected murderess after her Oscar-winning performance helped her to choose this project.

 

*TOP SECRET AFFAIR...a Warners comedy with Hayward and Kirk Douglas. From the production stills I have seen, Douglas seems to look very much in military uniform as he does in PATHS OF GLORY.*

 

This film, based on Marquand, was acquired by WB as a costarring vehicle for husband and wife Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. But Bogie's illness prevented them from making it. While good IMO, comedy was not Hayward's or Douglas' forte.

 

*MY FOOLISH HEART...A routine post-war romance, this time with Hayward and Dana Andrews, working for Sam Goldwyn. I liked these two in CANYON PASSAGE. But as for post-war romances, I am hard-pressed to believe that anything could be better than Jane Wyman and Van Johnson in MIRACLE IN THE RAIN.*

 

Well, it did earn Susan her second Oscar nomination. I think the title song won an Oscar.

 

*STOLEN HOURS...with a title like this, it cannot be anything but melodramatic. Here's the description from TCM's schedule: "An American heiress with an incurable disease falls in love with her surgeon." Yes, get the tissues ready.*

 

You know it, as Susan tackled Bette Davis' old part in this remake of DARK VICTORY. You should like the plus production values though.

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Yeah, Alrighty then. I watched the film yesterday where she was the Playgirl with a terminal illness and married the doctor who wouldn't tell her she was dying. What a lame story line. I don't think they really explained what type of illness she had.

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The irony is that Zanuck considered Hemingway his favorite writer and someone he personally identified with most.

 

Of all Susan's films, I think HOUSE OF STRANGERS and I CAN GET IT FOR YOU WHOLESALE are among the best. Plus, I think she rocks in a supporting role in ADAM HAD FOUR SONS, essentially stealing the picture out from under Ingrid Bergman.

 

I would say that of the films I recorded, I am most looking forward to seeing THE HONEY POT. But the comedy with Kirk Douglas looks interesting, though as you pointed out, comedy was not exactly what either star was known for doing. I think Kirk probably did more comedies than she did. I would like to see a re-airing of THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE, since it seems to have a lot of subtle, wicked humor and it's my favorite Kirk-Burt film after SEVEN DAYS IN MAY.

 

We need a Kirk Douglas marathon. LOL

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"Ah, the exquisite Susan Hayward-like tragedy of it all..."

- Rupert Everett in +My Best Friend's Wedding"

 

(That quote is a paraphrase.)

 

Hayward interests me a lot, although I'm not as "in" to her as I am to Stanwyck, Davis, Crawford, etc. This line-up of films on Monday was no doubt iffy in quality- but then, I'm hard pressed to think of a better, greater actress who did more crummy movies than Susan Hayward did...although even if she is bad in them, she's fun bad- watchable bad, over the top baaaaaaad.

 

A perusal of her titles in IMDB is like studying the path of a scud missile: from bit parts in the 40's to Smash-Up to ****-and-toga epics to sudsy singing biopics, The Conqueror one year, and two years later: winning (finally) Best Actress for I Want to Live!

 

Much like another Susan (Sarandon) it was a case of a red-headed sex symbol heading in to middle age, oft over-looked, and finally rewarded for what may have actually been her best performance and the best of that particular year. Yet after 1958 (and 1995) there was a point of no return for both actresses as the quality of their projects slipped, each seemed to take any role offered, and neither was nominated again. (Luckily Sarandon is still with us and will hopefully rebound some time.)

 

Man, Another Time, Another Place was the BIGGEST brick of cheese...I could not stop watching, nor could I keep my chin off the floor for more than three minutes at the time. Awful, awful, awful, and it made me even feel bad for Lana Turner, who really should have sued.

 

And was Bette Davis supposed to have been, what?, six, seven years old when she "gave birth" to Hayward? I mean they both tested for Scarlett O'Hara back in 1939....

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MyFavoriteFilms said:

*Of all Susan's films, I think HOUSE OF STRANGERS and I CAN GET IT FOR YOU WHOLESALE are among the best.*

 

My favorite Hayward role and film is probably THE PRESIDENT'S LADY (1953), where she plays a typically gutsy frontierswoman involved with Andrew Jackson. Although those others you mentioned are among my (many) favorites: the chemistry between her and Richard Conte in HOS is palpable, purely sexual; and ICGIFYW she is just great in her rise for rag(trade) to (almost) riches.

 

*I think she rocks in a supporting role in ADAM HAD FOUR SONS, essentially stealing the picture out from under Ingrid Bergman.*

 

When Susan was under contract to Paramount in the early 40s, she often stole the film from the star in her roles as second lead, usually playing the ****. So much so that the studio's top femme stars, Colbert, Goddard, and Lake, actively sought to not have Hayward be cast in their movies.

 

*I would say that of the films I recorded, I am most looking forward to seeing THE HONEY POT. But the comedy with Kirk Douglas looks interesting, though as you pointed out, comedy was not exactly what either star was known for doing. I think Kirk probably did more comedies than she did.*

 

I don't remember if it was for TOP-SECRET AFFAIR, or Susan's next comedy THE MARRIAGE GO ROUND (1961), but a reviewer stated that "her lightest touch could stun a horse" in his assessment of her comedy tecnique.Hayward interests me a lot, although I'm not as "in" to her as I am to Stanwyck, Davis, Crawford, etc. This line-up of films on Monday was no doubt iffy in quality- but then, I'm hard pressed to think of a better, greater actress who did more crummy movies than Susan Hayward did...although even if she is bad in them, she's fun bad- watchable bad, over the top baaaaaaad.

 

A perusal of her titles in IMDB is like studying the path of a scud missile: from bit parts in the 40's to Smash-Up to ****-and-toga epics to sudsy singing biopics, The Conqueror one year, and two years later: winning (finally) Best Actress for I Want to Live!

 

Much like another Susan (Sarandon) it was a case of a red-headed sex symbol heading in to middle age, oft over-looked, and finally rewarded for what may have actually been her best performance and the best of that particular year. Yet after 1958 (and 1995) there was a point of no return for both actresses as the quality of their projects slipped, each seemed to take any role offered, and neither was nominated again. (Luckily Sarandon is still with us and will hopefully rebound some time.)

 

Man, Another Time, Another Place was the BIGGEST brick of cheese...I could not stop watching, nor could I keep my chin off the floor for more than three minutes at the time. Awful, awful, awful, and it made me even feel bad for Lana Turner, who really should have sued.

 

JohnnyGeetar wrote:

*Hayward interests me a lot, although I'm not as "in" to her as I am to Stanwyck, Davis, Crawford, etc. This line-up of films on Monday was no doubt iffy in quality- but then, I'm hard pressed to think of a better, greater actress who did more crummy movies than Susan Hayward did...although even if she is bad in them, she's fun bad- watchable bad, over the top baaaaaaad.*

 

Davis and Crawford are two actresses "who did more crummy movies than Susan Hayward did", although I think Hayward is "a better, greater actress" than Crawford.

 

*A perusal of her titles in IMDB is like studying the path of a scud missile: from bit parts in the 40's to Smash-Up to ****-and-toga epics to sudsy singing biopics, The Conqueror one year, and two years later: winning (finally) Best Actress for I Want to Live!*

 

She was one of the top stars of the 50s, and was in many big boxoffice hits. In 1952 Darryl Zanuck called her his "12 Million Dollar Baby" because his studio had high hopes for her films in the coming year (this was the aggregate budget on these films); she was then 20th's top star-of course Marilyn's spectacular rise the next year changed that. She was also a favorite of Howard Hughes, and made several films for RKO during the decade (none of them was nearly as bad as THE CONQUEROR). Besides her SMASH-UP nomination in 1947, she was nominated for best actress in 1950 (MY FOOLISH HEART), 1952 (WITH A SONG IN MY HEART), 1955 (I'LL CRY TOMORROW - on loan to MGM), and finally winning in 1958.

 

*Much like another Susan (Sarandon) it was a case of a red-headed sex symbol heading in to middle age, oft over-looked, and finally rewarded for what may have actually been her best performance and the best of that particular year. Yet after 1958 (and 1995) there was a point of no return for both actresses as the quality of their projects slipped, each seemed to take any role offered, and neither was nominated again. (Luckily Sarandon is still with us and will hopefully rebound some time.)*

 

Hayward didn't quite "take any role offered", as she was happily married and chose semi-retirement, and occasionally worked out of boredom more than anything. Among movies she turned down were ELMER GANTRY - the part played by Jean Simmons, and HOW THE WEST WAS WON.

 

Of course, in the 60s parts for actresses of "a certain age" were few and far between, and if the part was good, the movie usually stunk (witness Davis, Crawford, etc.).

 

*Man, Another Time, Another Place was the BIGGEST brick of cheese...I could not stop watching, nor could I keep my chin off the floor for more than three minutes at the time. Awful, awful, awful, and it made me even feel bad for Lana Turner, who really should have sued.*

 

ANOTHER TIME, ANOTHER PLACE was a Lana Turner movie, and while arguably she should have sued for that, I think you meant WHERE LOVE HAS GONE.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Jan 27, 2011 1:52 PM

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I have already watched a few of these...guess I couldn't wait till the weekend! So far, my favorite has turned out to be WHERE LOVE HAS GONE. Several reasons:

 

- I have never seen a Joey Heatherton performance, and she's quite good. Love her voice! Casting her as Hayward's daughter is believable, though as others have pointed out, Hayward as Bette Davis' daughter is stretching things a bit.

- Mike Connors, in his pre-Mannix days, is very good and has excellent chemistry with Hayward. In fact, I don't think I've seen Hayward have this much chemistry with anyone on-screen, except for Richard Conte.

- The dialogue is crisp and delicious. It's more than a bit preachy in spots, but the zingers that Hayward and Davis hurl at each other makes the film very enjoyable to watch.

- The film has definite camp value, but even despite the occasional shlock, I think it hammers home some salient points about parenting and relationships in general. It also gives a unique glimpse into the mores that surround nuclear families in the 1960s.

- Real-life intrigue: I kept wondering what Cheryl Crane, Lana's daughter, thinks about this movie today.

 

CHERYL+CRANE-L2.jpg

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right right right...I meant to say "Where Love Has Gone"- although that is such a stupid title and not terribly appropriate for the film, but then again, what title would be? I still say Lana had a case.

 

And I still say Hayward was a great actress who (nonetheless) did a lot of crummy of films- of course, she did a lot of films period, as she was one of the last of the contract players. And it's to her credit that she's interesting and committed to the role in even the worst of them ( The Conquerer ; Valley of the Dolls ), and she also did plenty of very good movies as well and it is to note she fought her way up admirably from bit parts- I Married a Witch was on this weekend and she does such a good, fearless job with the thankless role of the unapologetically shrew-like fiancee of poor Fredric March.

 

Out of all the "great ladies" of the 40's and 50's- I wonder who she was in real life more than many of the others. I've read various conflicting reports as to what she was like offscreen, something tells me she was probably fun as hell unless you **** her off,

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> {quote:title=JonnyGeetar wrote:}{quote}

> "Ah, the exquisite Susan Hayward-like tragedy of it all..."

> - Rupert Everett in +My Best Friend's Wedding"

>

> (That quote is a paraphrase.)

I remember it that way too, Jonny. I understood the line immediately.

 

> A perusal of her titles in IMDB is like studying the path of a scud missile: from bit parts in the 40's to Smash-Up to ****-and-toga epics to sudsy singing biopics, The Conqueror one year, and two years later: winning (finally) Best Actress for I Want to Live!

>

> Man, Another Time, Another Place was the BIGGEST brick of cheese...I could not stop watching, nor could I keep my chin off the floor for more than three minutes at the time. Awful, awful, awful, and it made me even feel bad for Lana Turner, who really should have sued.

I love Another Time, Another Place the way I love The Fountainhead.

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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote}> I love Another Time, Another Place the way I love The Fountainhead.

 

 

Wait wait wait...I fudged the title, I meant to say Where Love Has Gone and not ATAP , (which someone in the thread correctly called me out on.) Which do you mean? (Or is it true for both?)

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