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Who's Minding the Mint? on 1/30 Funny Movie


MovieMadness
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I truly enjoyed watching this flick. Very cute, very funny...and something that is about as inoffensive as it comes, noteworthy considering it was made when the production code was being dismantled and it is not a Disney picture (it was released by Columbia).

 

Jim Hutton is good, but I kept wondering what it would've been like with Bob Newhart in the lead role. Or even Dick Van Dyke, though he had a comedy heist that same year, also with Dorothy Provine, called NEVER A DULL MOMENT.

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It was a little silly, but quite funny. It looked to me like a long series of Laurel and Hardy skits... a sinking rowboat, necktie caught in a printing press, ink squirted in face, a guy?s shirt goes through the press and has dollars printed on it, a garbage truck carries off the boxes of money, etc., etc.

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Fun movie, saw it in a theater when I was a kid....

 

*Why though was the aspect ratio 4:3 instead of what I expected a letterboxed 1.85:1 ?*

 

This happens rarely with TCM but I can't figure out a good reason they would have done this....

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A film like this was probably shot with future television distribution in mind. In such a situation, it might have been l:85:1 for a theater, but all the action was ?center weighted? for basic TV cropping in the days before letterboxing, so it was fine as it was shown last night.

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That is a really good answer that I hadn't thought of...

 

However since I only watch TCM as an HD channel I have come to expect that they won't pan and scan since they have the technology to (more or less) leave the aspect ratio alone.

 

I can't imagine "The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming!" in P&S and it was also part of the 1967 film era.

 

I am happy that TCM doesn't do this too often and would have preferred the aspect ratio be as close to original as possible. Sometimes they even windowbox as they did the original Casino Royale (1967) which was 2.35:1 couldn't figure out that one either. :-)

 

It's a mystery and you're right, it was still enjoyable as it was broadcast.

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I wish they stop referring to the 1.85 : 1 ratio as letterbox. Its only wide framing lines between frames within the film itself. This causes confusion for CinemaScope that is true widescreen that is letterbox.

 

On some TV sets the 1.85 is barely noticeable such as "The Nightmare Before Christmas"

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> I wish they stop referring to the 1.85 : 1 ratio as letterbox. Its only wide framing lines between frames within the film itself. This causes confusion for CinemaScope that is true widescreen that is letterbox.

>

> On some TV sets the 1.85 is barely noticeable such as "The Nightmare Before Christmas"

 

 

1.85:1 is considered a wide screen aspect ratio. Shown on a 4x3 TV, you will definitely see the black bars on the top and the bottom. Unfortunately, 1.85 is often rendered as 1.78:1 on TV, and DVD (even Criterion has done this.)

 

If it is truly shown as 1.85:1 on a 1.78:1 (16x9) TV, you will see thin slivers of black on the top and bottom of your screen, but only if your overscan is adjusted to a minimum. 5% overscan isn't uncommon on TVs, so even if the true 1.85:1 aspect ratio is maintained, you might not see any black strips.

 

Of course with a film in the aspect ratio of 2.35:1, commonly called Cinemascope, or 'Scope, you will definitely see the black bars top and bottom, even on a 16x9 TV.

 

TCM uses the same "letterboxed" card on the SD channel, and the HD channel. Perhaps when they go to true HD, they will only display the "letterboxed" card when showing 2.35:1 films.

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