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Movies that are not "CLASSIC"


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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> *"YOU MEAN YOU ACTUALLY HAD A BEEF WITH TCM?????? I'M SHOCKED."* - infinite1

>

> See. There's a _lot_ you don't know.

>

> *"Thought you had better taste then that."*

>

> And I thought you could discuss a subject without being rude or --demeaning-- condescending.

>

> Kyle In Hollywood

>

> Edited by: hlywdkjk on Feb 23, 2011 7:36 AM

 

Sorry, didn't think you would take it that way, I thought I was being funny. I guess not everyone has my warped sense of humor.

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fxreyman wrote:

You sure do make a broad assumption on what everyone does when watching TCM.

 

You are assuming that everyone tapes, or records movies on DVDRs or other technology. I would bet that less than half of those watching TCM never tapes any of the programs.

 

*infinite1 replied:*

*That is your assumption, based on what? I base mine on the amount of recordable options that are available.*

 

Well, I would say that this is your assumption, correct? Because, how would you know? Just because there are many ways one might record movies on cable, you are assuming that everyone knows about these devices and / or cares about them. I know a great many people who do not tape or record anything. They watch a movie or television show and move on to the next one. They are not in the least bit interested in watching the same movie or television show again.

 

fxreyman wrote:

I used to tape all the time. Never do any more. Why? Just do not want to. Plus if I really want a film on tape or a DVD, and it is available I will buy the DVD of the film.

 

If it is not on DVD, then I will wait until it is available on DVD.

 

*infinite1 replied:*

*You are assuming that every film you want will eventually be available on DVD? Considering the state of the economy, that's wishful thinking on your part.*

 

Of course it is wishful thinking. I realize that the economy is in the toilet and not many releases are making it to the various retail outlets. Of course I have many films still on VHS that are available on DVD, I just can not afford to purchase those right now. Eventually I will. But I am in no rush to purchase films due to my current lack of employment. If some of the films never become available on DVD that is fine too. I still have the VHS tapes and as long as I have a tape machine that works, I will be fine.

 

fxreyman wrote:

As far as repeats are concerned, I think there are several reasons for this:

1. TCM rents films to be shown. They probably have to show the film more than once to satisfy the rental agreement. I am not sure about this but it would make sense. Kyle and or Lynn would know more about this.

 

*infinite1 replied:*

*So why is this not the policy with every film that TCM shows, yet some fims are shown only once, then disapear for a number of months or years?*

 

As I wrote I am not the expert on this. But as is the case with other premium cable channels, those channels have had to block book movies to show a certain film. The way it was explained to me a long time ago was this:

If HBO wanted to show for instance the new True Grit that came out in December 2010 and wanted to show it exclusively lets say, they would have to negotiate a film deal with the distributor (in this case Paramount). Paramount knowing that True Grit was a huge success may want to limit the amount of times that HBO could show the film. Plus in order to get True Grit, HBO has to rent six other films from Paramount that may not have had as successful a run as True Grit did. So HBO now has to rent six additional films and show these six films lets say 12 times over a certain amount of time. HBO gets to show True Grit, maybe six times total and they then have to make room on their schedule to show the six other lesser known films as well.

This could be the same type of arrangement that TCM must go through to get the films it wants to show. Some are shown a couple of times per year where as other films are able to be shown multiple times.

 

fxreyman wrote:

2. When a repeat is aired, the original listing for the film may have been too late in the evening for anyone who does not have the ability to record a chance to see it at a better time.

 

*infinite1 replied:*

*So, TCM is all of a sudden concerned about viewers that don't have any recordable media. If that was the case they wouldn't be a 24/7 channel. I don't know of anyone without a recorder of some kind that stays up the whole night to watch TCM. So why have any programming on after hours at all?*

 

See previous response. Also.....

Because as Kyle has pointed out TCM has one network feed for the entire country. What is on at 8PM on the east coast is playing on the west coast at 5PM. So what I am trying to say is that if Jane in Chicago does not have a recordable device, and the film she really wants to see on TCM does not play again until the following Saturday, she at least has the chance to see it again. There is a reason for late night hour movies to be shown. Those who do have recordable devices can and should record if they can or want to.

 

fxreyman wrote:

3. If most people are like me, they are going to have a repeat viewing of the film anyway, especially if it is a favorites of theirs.

 

*infinite1 replied:*

*How many repeat viewings of a "favorite" film in a close proximity of time, lets say, once or twice a month, would it take to make you turn off the film? Two months, three months?*

 

Well if the film is a favorite someone will want to watch it. If The Adventures of Robin Hood is on repeated times within a six month period and I just happen to be channel surfing, (I always check to see what is playing on TCM) I will stop what I am doing and watch Errol and his buddies take on Sir Guy. If it is a film I really do not care to watch then yes, I will turn it off. Anyone would do this.

This is not rocket science. If you want to watch a movie, watch it. If you want to record a film, record it. If you do not want to watch it, don't. It is not too hard to figure out.

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}

> fxreyman wrote:

> 2. When a repeat is aired, the original listing for the film may have been too late in the evening for anyone who does not have the ability to record a chance to see it at a better time.

>

> *infinite1 replied:*

> *So, TCM is all of a sudden concerned about viewers that don't have any recordable media. If that was the case they wouldn't be a 24/7 channel. I don't know of anyone without a recorder of some kind that stays up the whole night to watch TCM. So why have any programming on after hours at all?*

>

> See previous response. Also.....

> Because as Kyle has pointed out TCM has one network feed for the entire country. What is on at 8PM on the east coast is playing on the west coast at 5PM. So what I am trying to say is that if Jane in Chicago does not have a recordable device, and the film she really wants to see on TCM does not play again until the following Saturday, she at least has the chance to see it again. There is a reason for late night hour movies to be shown. Those who do have recordable devices can and should record if they can or want to.

 

Why dosen't TCM simply create TCME and TCMW. Or is that not as simple as it sounds? The other movie channels, HBO, MAX, SHO, and TMC have west coast feeds that play the same films three hours behind the east coast. Why can't TCM follow suit?

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> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> Why dosen't TCM simply create TCME and TCMW. Or is that not as simple as it sounds? The other movie channels, HBO, MAX, SHO, and TMC have west coast feeds that play the same films three hours behind the east coast. Why can't TCM follow suit?

 

I would venture to say that Time Warner is quite pleased with the continued success of TCM. Being within the Turner Broadcasting System, a division owned by Time-Warner which includes the following cable channels:

 

CNN, HLN, TBS, TNT, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Boomerang, truTV, and over-the-air Atlanta station WPCH-17 (formerly WTBS, a near-simulcast of the national TBS).

 

I am sure that Time-Warner is quite pleased to have a Peabody Award-winning cable outlet as one of their own. I know I would. TCM is commercial free and I am sure will remain that way for the forseeable future. And because all of TCM's profits are from their subcriptions and to a lesser degree any sales derived from their website activities, then I am almost certain TW will leave it alone. Also, I am sre TCM has an operating budget that during this difficult time economy wise is watching every penny they spend.

 

As far as the other cable channels offering more than one alternative to their regular-baseline movie channel, like as you have indicated, HBO, SHowtime, etc. I would also argue that the Encore channels are in that category as well. I do not see how Time Warner can get anymore popular as they are in the television/cable field. TNT, and TBS are two of the more profitable networks with popular programs and tremendous ratings. Why would they want to expand TCM? My guess is they do not need to. Responding to a few vocal protests on their message boards about the inequalities of their programming decisions I am guessing is just not that high up on their radar screens.

 

And as Kyle in Hollywood has explained to you in this excerpt from his response to you on February 18th concerning network feeds:

 

*TCM has a single satellite feed for the whole country. What is seen at 8pm on the East Coast is being shown at 5pm on the West Coast. This difference in the time of day when a film is seen on TCM (convenient for some, inconvenient for just as many) is an issue that TCM addresses by showing some films more than once and at different hours of the day or even on different days of the week. It is a long-standing practice for TCM to repeat many popular or important films in order that the audience has access to them at an hour convenient to most persons regardless of where they happen to reside.*

 

*Contrary to what others have written, TCM seldom repeats films at 8pmEST/5pmPST with great regularity. But, occassionally, it does happen. For the past few years, Gone With The Wind has consistently been shown beginning at 8pm EST. (With a four-hour running time, there really aren't many "slots" for it on the daily schedule.) Now that 8pm time is fine for persons on the East Coast and even in the Midwest. But few working people out West are really able to be home in time to catch it from the start. And I have voiced frustration about that scheduling decision in these Forums more than once. Finally, this month TCM scheduled the film to start at 7pm out West and all of us just finishing our dinners could actually see the film from the beginning. "Thanks TCM. I knew you could it!"*

 

*Whether it happened because I kept carping about the hour or if we Left-Coasters just got lucky this time because TCM made the decision to schedule "Best Picture" winners to be seen at 10pm/7pm every night for the duration of the "31 Days..." event is unknown to me. But it makes no difference. All that matters is that Gone With The Wind started a little later in the evening for once.*

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Rey -

 

What he is getting at is not alternative versions of TCM but a separate East Coast and West Coast satellite feed of TCM from Atlanta.

 

About five years ago, TCM began the process to provide a West Coast feed so that "Prime TIme" programming was shown at the same hour as the East Coast feeds. (i.e. - all Robert Osborne introduced films would also start at 8pm on the West Coast.) But the plan was shelved shortly before it was to be implemented. No explanation for was given for abandoning the change.

 

But "mirrored" satellite feeds (same programming at 8pm) are really only important for commercial channels that are selling ads on their programming. With no advertisers able to buy time on specific TCM programs, the need for two feeds of TCM is negligible. And the additional cost of providing a second feed (a second server with the programming, a second satellite dish to beam the signal and space on a satelite circling the globe) brings no financial benefit to the channel. The money could be better spent in other areas - especially when TCM had to begin leasing _all_ the films for the channel.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Thank you Kyle!

 

I knew someone like yourself would be able to make hides or tails out of what Infinite1 was asking about. Maybe you and Lynn should start up a business about the movie business...... ala a movie question and answer consulting agency.........

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}

> Thank you Kyle!

>

> I knew someone like yourself would be able to make hides or tails out of what Infinite1 was asking about. Maybe you and Lynn should start up a business about the movie business...... ala a movie question and answer consulting agency.........

 

Sorry I wasn't clear enough for you. Thanks Kyle for acting as Translator.

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> Rey -

>

> What he is getting at is not alternative versions of TCM but a separate East Coast and West Coast satellite feed of TCM from Atlanta.

>

> About five years ago, TCM began the process to provide a West Coast feed so that "Prime TIme" programming was shown at the same hour as the East Coast feeds. (i.e. - all Robert Osborne introduced films would also start at 8pm on the West Coast.) But the plan was shelved shortly before it was to be implemented. No explanation for was given for abandoning the change.

>

> But "mirrored" satellite feeds (same programming at 8pm) are really only important for commercial channels that are selling ads on their programming. With no advertisers able to buy time on specific TCM programs, the need for two feeds of TCM is negligible. And the additional cost of providing a second feed (a second server with the programming, a second satellite dish to beam the signal and space on a satelite circling the globe) brings no financial benefit to the channel. The money could be better spent in other areas - especially when TCM had to begin leasing _all_ the films for the channel.

>

> Kyle In Hollywood

 

So, why do the pay channels have "mirrored" Satellite feeds if they are not commercial channels? They are not selling ads on THEIR programming.

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TCM is not perfect but it's the only place where I'm gonna see films like THREE WISE GIRLS (1932), THE HALF-NAKED TRUTH, CRACKED NUTS and the films of the Bowery Boys, as well as serials (coming up!!), and lots of cool film noir like DOA!

 

Oscar's month is a "necessary evil" that I put up with to get all the rest of the great stuff. No other channel on cable shows those films. I would rather they showed only pre-60's films, but it's not reality so I enjoy when they do it, which no one else on the dial really does, certainly not really old stuff, like silents and 30's films. Those are vacant from the TV other than TCM.

 

Love TCM, man. It grooves!

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*"So, why do the pay channels have "mirrored" Satellite feeds if they are not commercial channels? They are not selling ads on THEIR programming."* - infinite1

 

I don't know what the thoughts of premium channels is on such things. But I do know that premium channels are getting many dollars from their subscribers each month while TCM is getting dimes. That may have something to do with it.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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