Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
allaboutlana

TVMovie/Miniseries Trivia

Recommended Posts

Not him, although the officer who made the shoplifting bust may have been a Serpico-type undercover.

 

After an ambush / cop-killing, with a threat of more to come, the Chief of Ds actually crosses paths with a couple of activists who are masquerading as policemen. He notes that these men do not have black-tape bands across the front of their badges. -- This is a customary gesture from all officers after a recent loss of one of their own. His attention now focused on these individuals, he's on the fast tract to catching them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Retiring the question. Another case where I regret that I didn't keep a Views count.

 

1978 TV miniseries *To Kill a Cop.* Joe Don Baker led the cast in the role of Det. Chief Earl Eischeid. The cast included Desi Arnez Jr, Scott Brady, Roosevelt Grier, Robert Hooks, Ertha Kitt. The following series was entitled *Eischeid*, with Mr. Baker continuing in that role.

 

Open thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late 1960s TVM. Accidental paring up of an elderly immigrant running a butcher/deli ship in small-city New York State and a black "inner-city" youth, before that term came into usage. (Glitches: The old guy's nephew had offered his uncle's help in aiding city kids get out into the country for the summer. Never told the uncle; never got into the pants of the charity-work woman that he was trying to impress.)

 

The youth shows up at the man's place of business, not knowing he isn't expected.

Youth: "Hey, man, I came on a train!"

Altacocker: "I came on a boat. Fifty-five years ago."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As part of the old man's end-of-day ritual, he says 'good night' to the picture of his deceased son. If he forgets, he will walk back the length of the room to speak directly to the picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(12,237)

With the minsuderstanding straightened out, the parties concerned decide to give it a try. The lad and the old man discover one thing they have in common. The oldster lost his son in WWII, and the youngster has a brother presently serving in Viet Nam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lad came in with a family name that had been established, but he has a short resume. The older fellow -- recognized as one of the greats of his generation. British-born, two Oscars, other nominations and wins. Solid citizen pros in support roles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plot realistically deals with some realistic problems that come up

 

The locals' attitudes on just whom do they want shearing their swimming pool. Satisfactory negotiations.

 

A night out at a movie: tough punks on the street. "You still a tiger, Man, you just old. that's all."

 

Then they deal with the death of the older brother in The Nam.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IMDb site for this production is a small one. But every commentator, it seems, expresses a wish that it be aired again, or be issued on a DVD. It's puzzling as to why this is not done. -- It's from those greeting card people who own a network, and yet they do not show it. There may be copywrite tie-ups, or maybe the amount of expressed interest is not impressive enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just past 130 Views. The lad was played by N'Gai Dixon, son of Ivan, who seems not to have stayed in the Biz for long. There's also an alternate title, *The Merchant of Scarsdale*. And there is mention of another version, with Peter Falk in the lead. I can find no information on that.

 

And it is frustrating not to be able to see it again. With a script that offered many opportunities for maudlin sentiment, the performance, as I remember it, was balanced and quite realistic. The Hallmark people first aired it. Now, with a network of their own, I can't figure out why *Storm In Summer* can not be aired occasionally.

 

lavanderblue19's thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late 1980s TVM. Setting seems to be circa 1960s. An elderly Black veteran is notified that he is to be awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor for his service in WWII. He violently rejects the idea of accepting the award. A local retired Judge, lifelong acquaintance of he veteran is consulted. He approaches the veteran, who asks him to put a stop to the idea of the award. He will not name his reasons.

 

TVM? Performers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(12,508)

 

The retired judge finds himself back in the local courthouse (to his dismay) on several occasions. He is given the background of the action on which the award is based. One of the issues involved is that some White officers took credit for what had been accomplished. The judge discusses this with the veteran, but gets further information. Soldiers had shot him at the scene of the incident, and had wounded him severely. As to this trying to reverse it and cover it up -- they could shove it.

 

The story comes out slowly in a series of flashbacks, interspersed with issues in the "present" concerning the judge's family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The young Black had been, on his home ground, an accomplished field & stream-type sportsman. Good shot, good hunter, good fisherman. (He had also been a good teacher to the younger boy who later became the judge.) Drafted into the segregated Army -- he was put to work as a cook. By a chain of unforeseeable incidents he then found himself in a shooting situation, and he acquitted himself well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The field kitchen is attacked by a small group of German soldiers. The cook has access to a BAR, and, coming from an unexpected quarter, he kills all in the attacking party. He is standing there in the sudden quiet, the only man on either side left alive, when two jeeps carrying soldiers drive up. They take in the scene incredulously, then one of them asks, "You made this? You made this all by yourself?" He answers rudely to the effect of "See anybody else here?" The response is a racial slur, and then he is shot.

 

Wounded, out of the war and sent home, he festers for decades over the fact that he had been insulted and shot for taking action against the enemy. He reluctantly describes all this to the judge who is questioning him, and the still asks that those people with the medal stay away and leave him alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The judge goes back and forth between the Veterans' Rep who has contacted them and the ex-soldier. The Vets group actually do not believe him. -- They see him as the **** local who is standing between the Black veteran and his just reward. The judge starts doing some research.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Edging up on 175 Views.

The judge goes back to the veteran with his research findings. The place and the time of the incident when he was wounded fits within the period when some troops -- English-speaking Germans with stolen American uniforms and equipment -- were infiltrating the Allied lines in order to sabotage, misdirect and confuse the Allied efforts.

 

One fact he cited was the quote by the veteran from the man who had shot him. The accent sounded right, but the wording was suspect. He said 'You made this' when the usual American expression would be 'You did this.' The judge felt firm in his conclusion that the cook had been wounded by disguised Germans, not by his own troops. The Black veteran is slow to move away from his impression of some twenty years' standing, but he comes around. For the rest of that scene, his still slowly trying out this new fact, musing, "They was Germans...They was Germans..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The veteran drops his objections and accepts the Medal Of Honor. Following the solution of the veteran's misunderstanding and anger, the two men go back in their relationship to their youth -- when they were friends, before the local customs and culture separated them. And the Vets' services people, having become aware of the judge, check out his record and find a similar error -- he had been wounded in Korea, but had never been awarded the Purple Heart that was rightfully his. They include that among the paperwork errors they are now correcting. Last seen, the two old codgers are contentedly fishing together in the judge's boat.

 

The man in the judge role, deceased now, had a long career that included roles in some notable screen films, and several TV series stints as star / title character. The Black Veteran was played by an actor still in the business, been working since the early 1970s. Has support roles in a number of familiar bigsereen titles, and has held running roles in a number of TV series.

 

When you care enough...

 

♪ Luck ain't got a thing to do with how you play the game...♪

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Jul 16, 2012 4:19 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting past 300 Views:

I sort of daja'd my vou here. Twice in a row I looked up a TVM that had impressed me, and found they both were produced by those greeting card people who have a Hall.

 

--In that spate of "wild talent" Sci Fi shows that aired around the turn of the century, the Black actor had a second-lead role in a one-season series about a group on a college campus, people with special abilities, engaged in studying -- and being studied for -- purposes of psychic research. He was the oldest of their number, and sort of the moral / ethical center of the group.

 

The judge -- ♫ Riding the trail to who-knows-where; Luck is his companion...♪

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

415 Views

 

*Decoration Day.* 1990 on The Hallmark Hall of Fame. James Garner as the retired judge. Bill Cobbs as the Black Medal Of Honor winner. I always figured Mr. Cobbs as the next man called when Morgan Freeman had other commitments.

 

Open thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Late 20th Century TVM. Story involving a performing drag queen at the center. Downright astonishing as to casting. That "To Wong Foo -- Julie Newmar" film had its surprises, but this was even more unexpected. I mean, really, you'd-never-guess-it casting.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...