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Snow White (Not ON TCM)


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Max Fleischer's "Gulliver's Travels" is in the public domain which makes it too easy (and cheap) to obtain.

 

Paramount who is the owner, re-released "Mr. Bug Goes to town" as "Hoppity Goes to Town" and the copyright was renewed by Paramount which makes any public domain copies illegal.

 

You might see different releases under U.M.& M. TV Corp and National Telefilm (NTA). The old *original* "Little Audrey" cartoon shorts also had the same releases and can be found in public domain even though Paramount originally owned them under "Famous Studios".

 

I am not referring to the ones made by Harveytoon which are copyrighted.

 

"Little Lulu by Marge" shorts are also public domain. The newer ones, basicly a charactor redesign, made during the 1990's are own by Cinar Animation of Canada and was last seen on HBO. Glad Cinar put some meat on her bones so she doesn't look like Olive Oyl as a little girl.

 

So in a nutshell most of Max Fleischer's animation and many other studios has fell to public domain.

 

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greatcartoons.JPG

 

So will TCM air them? Like Little Audrey, you can always keep dreaming :)

 

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I'm quite a Fleischer fan. I think Betty Boop's Snow-White is the greatest animated film ever made. While it is true that most of the Fleischer toons are PD, many are still almost impossible to find. The B&W Popeyes are in good quality boxed sets. The Superman series is on DVD. There are various Boop DVDs, but many of her best, like Red Hot Mama, are hard to find. Most of the Screen Songs toons are hard to find. I have collected all but one of the known existing Betty Boop toons, be they Screen Songs, Talkartoons, or Betty Boop Cartoons, and made my own 9 disc set, in chronological order. There are three I do not have. Accordion Joe seems to exist only in the UCLA film archives. And, there are two lost toons, made in the late 30s, so not Betty's best.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Feb 13, 2011 2:02 AM

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> And what about "Betty Boops Poor Cinderella"? A rare chance to see great animation like that simulated "3D" scene of the carraige going past the countryside. "Somewhere in Dreamland" used that special effect. Seeing Betty Boop in color is also rare.

>

 

The Fleischers were very inventive. Dave invented rotoscoping, but Max took credit for it. They probably invented that "3D" effect as well. A moving background, often a big round one that rotated, is positioned behind a glass plate. The foreground character(s) are painted on the glass plate, and the moving background is moved for each cell painted on the glass. This was actually used as a time-saving device, so that less had to be drawn for each cell. It was very effective.

 

My favorite toon on the Fleischer Color Classics DVD is Dancing on the Moon, but I like them all.

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OK, you guys in here seem to be very knowledgable about non-Disney animation. I've often wondered if there is enough material for TCM to do an animation festival without the Disney materials - while still focusing on feature-length films? Could it be done without resorting to "filler" of unexceptional kiddie films?

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> OK, you guys in here seem to be very knowledgable about non-Disney animation. I've often wondered if there is enough material for TCM to do an animation festival without the Disney materials - while still focusing on feature-length films? Could it be done without resorting to "filler" of unexceptional kiddie films?

>

> Kyle In Hollywood

 

*Watership Down*

*Fantastic Planet*

*Hoppity Goes to Town*

*The Triplets of Belleville*

*Persepolis*

*Wallace and Grommet: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit*

*I Married a Strange Person*

*Allegro non Troppo*

 

Are all features, just for a start, without any Ralph Bakshi... ;) Most of those makers have other features. Also, there are lots of short toons that are not "unexceptional kiddie films." All early Betty Boops would appeal quite a bit to adults. After all, her migrating garter has been given credit for starting the Hays Office... WB, MGM, Van Buren, and others, made lots of toons that were really aimed at adults, which includes early Merrie Melodies and Looney Tunes. There are some amazing B&W Porkys that are rarely shown, like Porky in Wackyland. But, the film I would most like to see, that I have never seen, is a 20 minute silent animation, made by the the Fleischers, The Einstein Theory of Relativity, made in 1923. There are amazing surrealist Koko the Clown silents, like Koko's Earth Control. Silent Felix the Cat cartoons are great. Pre-code Flip the Frog, often sexy. I'd love to see a good animation festival on TCM.

 

Addendum: a few features I should have remembered the first time:

 

*The Cosmic Eye*

*Yellow Submarine*

*Popol Vu: The Creation Myth of the Maya*

*The Point*

 

and, a couple of the few anime I like:

 

*Grave of the Fireflies*

*My Neighbor, Totoro*

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Feb 14, 2011 3:41 AM

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I'm glad you brought up the Merrie Melodies, that are not just simply "filler". Back in the 1980's my local downtown theatre had a special Merrie Melodies matinee one Saturday afternoon which was sponsered by a local radio station. The theatre was packed with both kids and *adults!*

 

We still have a little "kid" inside of us, lol.

 

One of my recent Merrie Melodies acquisition was "I Love to Sing-a" an animated take on the Al Jolson song in "The Singing Kid" which by the way came with that DVD. I never seen that cartoon before and neither the Al Jolson movie. That song stayed with me for over a month.

 

Love hearing and seeing long since forgotten material. I bet there are a quite a few Merrie Melodies never seen since their original theatrical release.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Love_to_Singa

 

owl_singa.jpg

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>>One of my recent Merrie Melodies acquisition was "I Love to Sing-a" an animated take on the Al Jolson song in "The Singing Kid" which by the way came with that DVD. I never seen that cartoon before and neither the Al Jolson movie. That song stayed with me for over a month.

 

That song and cartoon stayed with me for over 50 years. I only saw it again recently and immediately flashed back to my childhood when my family would equate me to the little owl in that cartoon as I went around the house not only singing that song, but just about any catchy tune that I heard on the radio.

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Thanks everyone for the input so far. I like the inclusion of some foreign-made films. And a Ralph Bashki film certainly should find a place in the line-up. American Pop?

 

I wasn't thinking of excluding "short" animated films completely from the potential spotlight. In fact, I think Winsor McCay would have to be the starting point of any TCM animation festival. At least, I hope it would be the beginning. And my "kiddie filler" comment only meant to exclude 60's-era Children's Matinee productions like *Hey There, It's Yogi Bear!* off the the list. (Ham - I think Turner has the rights to all the Hanna-Barbera products. They are certainly a big part of the Cartoon Network. Or were.)

 

Is there really a dearth of animated films from 1940 to 1960? (or 1970?) Especially U.S.-made films? *Gay Purr-ee* and *The Phantom Tollbooth* are the ones that first come to my mind.

 

As a start to a list of potential materials, here's what I remember having been on TCM in the past -

*The Adventures Of Prince Achmed*

*The Phantom Tollbooth*

*Who Framed Roger Rabbit*

*The Nightmare Before Christmas*

and the Anime Features co-hosted by John Lassetter.

 

Looking forward to any other ideas and additions.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Kyle, I have "The Nightmare Before Christmas" and the making of the movie on DVD and it is great. But this is *stop motion* animation. I like to keep this subject idea to the old fashion *cell animation* only. Its a shame that Disney are the few studios still doing this, in what I think is a dying art form.

 

Most animated movies today are CGI like the "Toy Story" series and I don't look at them as cartoons.

 

A footnote: Even stop motion is becoming a dying art form, Tim Burton is the only one I think is keeping it alive, kind of Tim's tribute to Ray Harryhausen.

 

clore - that is a cute story about you childhood, I bet your mom wish they had camcorders back then lol. :)

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From Japan besides the wonderful Studio Ghibli films which are must:

 

Lupin the III Castle of Cagliostro directed by Miyazaki in 1979 before his Studio Ghibli days

Millennium Actress directed by the late Satoshi Kon (actually any of his films are worthy but this is my personal favorite). Kon's films show animation is not just for kids.

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time this is the best animated movie you have not seen. It came out in 2006 and is just incredibly charming. The one film that I think deserved to beat Pixar but it came to the US to late and wasn't eligible for the Academy Awards. More people need to see this movie. I know it's not old but if TCM ever did something dedicated to animation it would be great if they could play it.

 

 

Not from Japan but as a kid I loved the following non Disney cartoons. The first one is especially a Classic.

 

The Last Unicorn

Land Before Time

Secret of Nihm

An American Tail

Anastasia (historically inaccurate as it is)

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You guys realize that this would probably cause FredC to go apopleptic, right?

 

You want to see how close he came to that a few years ago, search the archives for Hayao Miyazaki. TCM did a tribute to Miyazaki a few years ago that just about tore TCM City apart. And five years later, it will likely sound eerily familiar.

 

Some subject matter here just stays evergreen 24/7, 365 days a year, every year, come rain or shine.

 

Thus it has always been, thus it shall always be.

 

At least, after all these years, that's what it feels like more often than not. :)

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> {quote:title=Scottman wrote:}{quote}

> Would Bill Plympton's THE TUNE (1992) be too recent?

 

 

Well, I did put his 1997 *I Married a Strange Person* on my list.

 

I have no objection to recent, if most titles are older. But, it would be easy enough to make a program of only older titles, starting in the silent era, if that would mollify Fred, and others. Personally, I'd like to go at least as recent as 1976, to include *Allegro non Troppo*, which is sort of an emulation of *Fantasia*, that some people like better.

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I am not actually suggesting that TCM play animated movies but if they ever consider might as well give them suggestions.

 

I didn't have the channel when they did the Miyazaki fest. I wish I did but then I guess it doesn't matter now since I have most of the Studio Ghibli films on DVD including the wonderful Only Yesterday (directed by Takahata) which remains unlicensed in the US. I am glad TCM did show these films at one time though and introduced people to these movies who might not have watched them otherwise.

 

 

As for people complaining I think that is never going to change. :)

 

Edited by: Kinokima on Feb 15, 2011 10:05 AM

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*"You guys realize that this would probably cause FredC to go apopleptic, right?"* - lzcutter

 

Going apopleptic is second nature to Dobbsy - if not his primary state of being lately. I think cabin fever is setting in. So I suggest the animation festival be held in May or June.

 

But I envision a TCM animation festival being widely focused and inclusive of many more historically important pieces than the anime festival was. (Plus, the anime festival showed each film twice in one evening - once with sub-titles and hours later in a dubbed version. That was unique - and made the event all the more exhasperating for those not interested in the films.)

 

I wouldn't want to exclude stop-motion films from the festival. They are an important part of the animated film canon. I'd like to see some "Puppetoon" shorts - or features, if features exist.

 

And perhaps TCM could get permission from WB/Time-Warner to present some of the "Out Of Circulation" titles for one night. But that isn't a necessity.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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