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acomixguy

Am I missing the boat on Warner Archives?

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I have pondered this question quite a bit, "Should I be buying Warner Archive and other studio DVRs?" Needless to say I have REAL mixed feelings on this! How long do burnt discs last? Am I decreasing the chances of seeing actual pressed releases of these movies by supporting the Archive model? The price point seems much too high! Can't I simply record my own DVRs from TCM and have the same basic quality? I hope many of you will respond to this post and help me weigh the pros & cons of this new approach to classic movie retailing and if I should jump on board! Thanks

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> {quote:title=acomixguy wrote:}{quote} Am I decreasing the chances of seeing actual pressed releases of these movies by supporting the Archive model?

 

Actually, I think since most of the studios are cutting back on full-blown releases of classics, especially lesser known films, the archive model will be the only way that those films have a chance of release. If buyers don't support it then there will be little hope for anything but the most major hits to be released. Apparently, since others studio are joining in on this form of release it seems to be working.

 

As for DVD-Rs lasting, I've recorded several thousand since the format began and even my earliest recordings look just fine. How long will they last? That's anybody's guess, but I'm not losing sleep over it. Anything can happen to them. There's probably more of a chance that my house will burn down before my recordings degrade. I'm not going to drive myself nuts worrying about it.

 

Sure you can record from TCM, I certainly do, but keep in mind that the quality will depend on the signal you get from your cable or satellite service. Will that please you? Only you can decide.

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I have purchased several titles from the Warner's Archive and they have all been excellent prints. They now have even upgraded the poster art in their DVD covers. A friend who received a damage copy of a tv show did not have trouble exchanging it. The films are overpriced but if you wait for one of their special sales it's worth it.

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> {quote:title=acomixguy wrote:}{quote}

> I have pondered this question quite a bit, "Should I be buying Warner Archive and other studio DVRs?" Needless to say I have REAL mixed feelings on this! How long do burnt discs last? Am I decreasing the chances of seeing actual pressed releases of these movies by supporting the Archive model? The price point seems much too high! Can't I simply record my own DVRs from TCM and have the same basic quality? I hope many of you will respond to this post and help me weigh the pros & cons of this new approach to classic movie retailing and if I should jump on board! Thanks

 

 

The life of a burned disc depends on the quality of the media, and the quality of the burn. Crummy media, like Memorex, can degrade to unplayable in less than a year. Good burns on top quality media, like Taiyo Yuden, and Verbatim AZO, or Data Life, will probably last as long as they make DVD players.

 

I don't know what quality media the Studios' burn on demand biz are using. If they don't put copy protection on their discs, you could easily make backup copies on top quality media, solving any durability problems.

 

As to image quality, discs from the studios should be at least as good as, and probably superior to, any you would make with a DVD recorder. They should be free of logos, the occasional broadcast glitch, and the not-so-occasional blotchy encoding you get on cable.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote} If they don't put copy protection on their discs, you could easily make backup copies on top quality media, solving any durability problems.

 

Don't know what the other studios are doing, but at least some (so I assume all) of the Warner Archive releases are copy protected.

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Yeah, I was afraid of that. In that case, it is easy to make backup copies, if you have a computer. ;)

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And before splurging, I suggest sending an email to Warners (or whichever studio you're purchasing from), tell it the brand and model of your player, and ask if the product will play on it.

 

When Warners was having a sale, I bought several DVDs and none of them would play. I then sent the email and, in response, I received a laundry list of models under my player's brand name that will not play the Warners Archives product.

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> {quote:title=ChiO wrote:}{quote}

> I then sent the email and, in response, I received a laundry list of models under my player's brand name that will not play the Warners Archives product.

 

If it's not too long, how about posting it? I've yet to run across a player, recorder or my computer that wouldn't play one.

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