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PRETTY WOMAN and FORREST GUMP on TCM


PrinceSaliano
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In my state of Pennsylvania we can get classic license plates for a car when its 15 years old. After its 25 years old it can be registered as an antique. I guess we should have Turner Antique Movies for "Casablanca" and Turner Classic Movies for "Dumb and Dumber".

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Well the term 'classic' is really a vague one but those of us who have watched TCM for years know that 'classic' really means mostly movies made during the studio system era. To me if TCM has too many movies outside of that era it has changed it identify. So far this is NOT the case in my view and like I said being oscar month I know I can expect to see oscar winning movies that were made after 1970.

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> {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> All I can say is, thank God for the Hal Roach marathons.

 

And yet, if somehow these movies were magically transplaced intact frame-by-frame back in time to having come out in the 1940s, you would have no problem with them, might then call them classics, just because of their age.

 

Personally, I like both films, and both I think have staying power through many decades to come.

 

By the way, how many more threads do we need this week on this subject?

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This month is intended for movies that won or were nominated for Oscars. That?s what they?re doing.

 

Just as all movies made during the classic era were not great those made afterwards are not all lacking in quality. I know we have younger posters who love the usual TCM fare; would it hurt us to watch an occasional good film from the current era? Many of us will be gone by then but 30 years from now these folks will be looking at The Hurt Locker and both True Grits on some ?Classic Movie? venue if they?re still around. I have no idea what they will be thinking, maybe wondering what the hell we were, but like us they?ll have the goods to compare them to what they have.

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> > All I can say is, thank God for the Hal Roach marathons.

>

> And yet, if somehow these movies were magically transplaced intact frame-by-frame back in time to having come out in the 1940s, you would have no problem with them, might then call them classics, just because of their age.

>

> Personally, I like both films, and both I think have staying power through many decades to come.

>

> By the way, how many more threads do we need this week on this subject?

You just don't get it. And how could PRETTY WOMAN (or FORREST GUMP for that matter) possibly be a 1940s film? Gadzooks.

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Filmlover gets it. So do I.

 

What you and others want here is this:

 

No films made after a certain year (lets say for argumentative purposes that year is 1960) should be shown on this cable channel that specifically shows "classic" films.

 

Because, to call a film a classic means that the film MUST be from a certain time period only.

 

We just happen to disagree with what you want to argue about.

 

Now I am off to see a live showing of Boeing, Boeing.

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote on another thread:}{quote}

> Because I have to tell you...... IMHO about 50% of the time TCM shows enough junk made from before 1960 it makes my stomach upset.

 

You're on the wrong channel and the wrong message board. Try AMC. :)

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> {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> > > {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> > > All I can say is, thank God for the Hal Roach marathons.

> >

> > And yet, if somehow these movies were magically transplaced intact frame-by-frame back in time to having come out in the 1940s, you would have no problem with them, might then call them classics, just because of their age.

> >

> > Personally, I like both films, and both I think have staying power through many decades to come.

> >

> > By the way, how many more threads do we need this week on this subject?

> You just don't get it. And how could PRETTY WOMAN (or FORREST GUMP for that matter) possibly be a 1940s film? Gadzooks.

 

I do get it, but you are standing by the films made before a certain periood ONLY because they were made before a certain period. Period.

 

And if you are sayinig they couldn't make a film like Pretty Woman or Forrest Gump in the 1930s or 1940s because of the characters in them, then you would have to dismiss Stagecoach and Johnny Belinda.

 

Come on, give TCM a break. We all know this is 31 Days of Oscars, and this doesn't mean that it is only movies TCM is saluting from say 1927 to 1960...they are trying to do justice to the Oscars by presenting an all-encompassing look at the Oscars from their beginning to the present. Can't you put up with a few more recent pictures for one month?!

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Although a 1930's fanatic who has watched over 1200 films from that decade thanks to the blessing of TCM, I am glad they also include more recent pictures. During this Oscar month, I wish that they had been able to include "The Pianist" since it is as close to perfect of a movie as has been made during the past decade and when Roman Polanski was recognized by the Academy for his direction it was my favorite moment in Oscar history. Hey, Hitler killed his mother and Manson killed his wife and unborn child, the U.S.A. should be able to cut the guy a little slack. Considering "The Pianist" in addition to "Chinatown", "Tess", "Knife in the Water" and "Repulsion"-- for my money his resume is the best since Orson Welles.

 

Edited by: 30srbest on Feb 12, 2011 7:19 PM

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> > All I can say is, thank God for the Hal Roach marathons.

>

> And yet, if somehow these movies were magically transplaced intact frame-by-frame back in time to having come out in the 1940s, you would have no problem with them, might then call them classics, just because of their age.

 

That?s not what he?s saying.

 

My opinion is that Jean Harlow films are much better, and in ?Red Dust? we know what she was, but the film was so much more classy, the dialogue was much better, and the cast was better. It?s a much more enjoyable film.

 

reddust7.jpg

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Richard Gere and Julia Roberts are just creepy looking to me. They look like a couple of people I?d see in Los Angeles, in the smog, on a hot sweaty summer day, with the air smelling like car exhaust. They are about the two must unglamorous people I?ve ever seen in movies. I don?t understand how they got into the film business.

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FredCDobbs wrote:

<< They look like a couple of people I?d see in Los Angeles, in the smog, on a hot sweaty summer day, with the air smelling like car exhaust. >>

 

I think that would also describe your last photo, LOL! Clark Gable looks like he's been working underneath the chassis of an old automobile.

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or

h4. The Annual Let's Reach for Another Demographic

(31 Days of Oscar)

 

I have many friends who still have no idea of a good classic. If it's b&w, there must be something wrong it. I find the pairing of Gere/Roberts a little creepy too, but then the premise of Pretty Woman isn't Red Dust. I find Roberts one of the least classy (and we have a current crop of classless) actresses out there. As far as these movies go, there will be a few more of the newer ones on before the awards.

 

But I am amazed at the number of women who consider Pretty Woman their favorite romantic movie ! ! !

I just get WT* about that! What are they thinking?

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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}

> Well the term 'classic' is really a vague one but those of us who have watched TCM for years know that 'classic' really means mostly movies made during the studio system era.

 

The word "classic" is _not_ vague, nor does it mean "mostly movies made during the studio system era". I'm glad I kept my dictionary definition of "classic" from another thread:

 

"Classic" means any art (music, dance, paintings, film, etc) that appeals to the majority of people. This means it should transcend time and culture. When it doesn't, you call it "An Asian classic" or "A Latino classic".

Mozart's music, Shakespere's plays, Astaire's dancing can be enjoyed and appreciated by those in South America as well as India. Sure, there's always going to be those who don't agree or understand them, but overall they strike a chord in most people. It shouldn't matter if they were done 300 years ago or 45 years ago, if they still move humans emotionally, they are "classic".

 

A "future classic" is an art that critics and those with the pulse on the art form predict will stand the test of time, but it hasn't been given the time yet.

 

I personally loathe FOREST GUMP & PRETTY WOMAN in particular. I think the stories and acting are painfully ametuerish. Obviously, they struck a chord with someone, if they won accolades from their peers. Only time will tell once it gives it's true test as to whether they will be deemed "classic" 50-100 years from now.

 

And I'd take Clark Gable looking like that ANY day!

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http://www.poppolitics.com/archives/2008/04/its-not-pretty-the-cost-of-glamorizing-prostitution

 

?A comprehensive 2004 mortality study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and conducted by the American Journal of Epidemiology, shows that workplace homicide rates for women working in prostitution are 51 times that of the next most dangerous occupation for women (which is working in a liquor store). The average age of death of the women studied was 34.?

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