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Why not show a 1954 film, instead of a 1982 film about 1954?


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> {quote:title=Kinokima wrote:}{quote}

>

> He wasn't trying to look like Errol Flynn he was trying to portray an Errol Flynn type character in the 50's. The fact that he looked old, drunk, and washed up means he portrayed the character perfectly.

>

 

He was supposed to be the ?star? of the film, but he wasn?t in it very much. Looks like they just used his name and brought him out and propped him up every now and then so they could claim he was in the movie.

 

Regarding the way he ?acted?, he reminded me of W.C. Fields and John Barrymore in their last films.

 

Peter O?Toole, ?acting? drunk in public:

 

9bgpja.jpg

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> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}

> . > I recently posted a thread about my three most hideous, psychotic film characters I have come upon: Richard Widmark's Tommy Udo character in "Kiss of Death", Javier Bardem's Anton Chigurh character in "No Country For Old Men" and Bob Hoskins' Joe Hilditch character in "Felicia's Journey". I knew as I was writing the post when I stated that "Felicia's Journey" was released in 1999 that this would be a thumbs-down and a turn-off to some of you and you would not even reply to the post.

>

 

Hey, I replied to it ! You didn't reply to my reply.

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*But, after 64 years of watching films (the ones I can remember), I have learned that the quality of Hollywood films dropped off sharply in the late 1950s and early ?60s, and then it fell down to almost nil by about 1968. There are very few exceptions. There were a few good films made after about 1960, but almost none after about 1966.*

 

My goodness Fred, you really do limit yourself to just a handful of films after 1960 don't you?

 

Sure I agree that for the most part film making from before 1960 was very well done. And as you have written in the past, almost nothing could be compared to the wizards who all worked within the old studio system. But to sit here and say that after 1966 there weren't very many well-made films I think goes a little too far.

 

You can sit there out at your lonely outpost in the west and make these proclamations all you want, but I think you need to look at all films from all time periods to be able to broaden your horizons.

 

There are many, many films from after 1960 that have received very favorable ratings from a whole host of reviewers and film-goers alike.

 

So I decided to do a little research, and I have selected ten films from each year after 1960. Who knows, maybe you will find out about something you thought would never happen..... You might find a more recent film you might like.

 

Here then are 10 really good films from each year after 1960:

 

1960

The Apartment

Elmer Gantry

The Gallant Hours

Inherit the Wind

The Magnificent Seven

Psycho

Sink the Bismarck!

Spartacus

The Sundowners

Swiss Family Robinson

 

1961

The Absent-Minded Professor

Breakfast at Tiffany's

The Children's Hour

The Guns of Navarone

The Hustler

Judgement at Nuremberg

The Parent Trap

A Raisin in the Sun

Two Rode Together

West Side Story

 

1962

Cape Fear

Lawrence of Arabia

Lonely Are the Brave

The Longest Day

The Manchurian Candidate

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

The Miracle Worker

The Music Man

Ride the High Country

To Kill a Mockingbird

 

1963

Billy Liar

Charade

From Russia With Love

The Great Escape

The Haunting

Hud

Lilies of the Field

McLintock!

Sunday in New York

Tom Jones

 

1964

The Americanization of Emily

Becket

The Best Man

Fail-Safe

Goldfinger

A Hard Day's Night

Mary Poppins

Seven Days in May

The Train

Zulu

 

1965

36 Hours

The Agony and the Ecstasy

The Bedford Incident

The Flight of the Phoenix

In Harm's Way

Mirage

Repulsion

The Rounders

The Sound of Music

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold

 

1966

The Battle of Algiers

Blowup

Born Free

Fantastic Voyage

The Fortune Cookie

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A Man for All Seasons

The Professionals

The Sand Pebbles

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolfe?

 

1967

Bonnie and Clyde

Cool Hand Luke

The Dirty Dozen

El Dorado

The Graduate

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Hour of the Gun

In Cold Blood

In the Heat of the Night

Point Blank

 

1968

2001: A Space Odyssey

Bullitt

The Lion in Winter

The Odd Couple

Once Upon a Time in the West

Planet of the Apes

Romeo and Juliet

Targets

The Thomas Crown Affair

Will Penny

 

1969

Anne of the Thousand Days

Downhill Racer

Easy Rider

Midnight Cowboy

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

Support Your Local Sheriff!

They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

True Grit

Where Eagles Dare

The Wild Bunch

 

1970

Chisum

Diary of a Mad Housewife

Five Easy Pieces

The Great White Hope

I Never Sang for My Father

Little Big Man

MASH

Monte Walsh

Patton

Tora! Tora! Tora!

 

1971

The Andromeda Strain

Carnal Knowledge

Dirty Harry

The Emigrants

Fiddler on the Roof

The French Connection

Harold and Maude

The Hospital

Klute

The Last Picture Show

 

1972

1776

Cabaret

The Candidate

Deliverance

The Godfather

Jeremiah Johnson

Junior Bonner

The Poseidon Adventure

The Ruling Class

Sounder

 

1973

American Graffiti

Badlands

Bang the Drum Slowly

Day for Night

The Day of the Jackal

The Paper Chase

Serpico

The Sting

The Three Musketeers

A Touch of Class

 

1974

Blazing Saddles

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Chinatown

The Four Musketeers

The Godfather, Part II

Harry and Tonto

The Longest Yard

Murder on the Orient Express

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three

A Woman Under the Influence

 

1975

Bite the Bullet

Dog Day Afternoon

Jaws

The Man Who Would Be King

Nashville

Night Moves

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Shampoo

Three Days of the Condor

The Wind and the Lion

 

1976

All the President's Men

Bound for Glory

Marathon Man

Network

The Omen

The Outlaw Josey Wales

Robin and Marian

Rocky

The Shootist

Silver Streak

 

1977

Annie Hall

Black Sunday

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Julia

MacArthur

The Man Who Loved Women

Saturday Night Fever

Semi-Tough

Star Wars

The Turning Point

 

1978

The Buddy Holly Story

Comes a Horseman

Coming Home

Days of Heaven

The Deer Hunter

Go Tell the Spartans

Grease

Heaven Can Wait

House Calls

An Unmarried Woman

 

1979

10

Apocalypse Now

Being There

Breaking Away

The China Syndrome

The Electric Horseman

Heartland

Kramer vs. Kramer

Manhattan

Starting Over

 

1980

Airplane!

Coal Miners Daughter

The Earthling

The Elephant Man

The Empire Strikes Back

The Long Good Friday

Melvin and Howard

Ordinary People

Raging Bull

The Stunt Man

 

1981

Chariots of Fire

Das Boot

Eye of the Needle

Gallipoli

On Golden Pond

Outland

Prince of the City

Ragtime

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Reds

 

1982

Blade Runner

Gandhi

The Grey Fox

The Man From Snowy River

Missing

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Tootsie

The Verdict

Victor/Victoria

The Year of Living Dangerously

 

1983

A Christmas Story

The Dresser

Educating Rita

Gorky Park

Local Hero

The Right Stuff

Silkwood

Tender Mercies

Under Fire

Without a Trace

 

1984

Amadeus

Blood Simple

Ghostbusters

The Killing Fields

The Natural

Romancing the Stone

A Soldier's Story

Starman

The Terminator

Under the Volcano

 

1985

After Hours

Back to the Future

Into the Night

Murphy's Romance

Out of Africa

Prizzi's Honor

A Room With a View

Silverado

The Trip to Bountiful

Witness

 

1986

Children of a Lesser God

Crocodile Dundee

Duet for One

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

Hannah and Her Sisters

Heartbreak Ridge

Hoosiers

The Money Pit

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Top Gun

 

1987

84 Charing Cross Road

Broadcast News

Full Metal Jacket

Gardens of Stone

House of Games

The Last Emperor

Matewan

Moonstruck

The Untouchables

The Whales of August

 

1988

The Accused

Alien Nation

Big

Bull Durham

Crossing Delancey

Die Hard

Midnight Run

Mississippi Burning

The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!

Stand and Deliver

 

1989

Crimes and Misdemeanors

Do the Right Thing

Driving Miss Daisy

Farewell to the King

Field of Dreams

Glory

Henry V

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

My Left Foot

When Harry Met Sally.....

 

1990

Avalon

Dances With Wolves

Goodfellas

The Grifters

The Hunt for Red October

Longtime Companion

Mountains of the Moon

Reversal of Fortune

Tremors

Truly, Madly, Deeply

 

1991

City Slickers

Dead Again

Defending Your Life

The Doctor

Fried Green Tomatoes

Grand Canyon

The Rocketeer

The Silence of the Lambs

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

Terminator 2: Judgement Day

 

1992

A Few Good Men

Glengarry Glen Ross

Howards End

A League of Their Own

Malcolm X

Passion Fish

The Player

A River Runs Through It

Sneakers

Unforgiven

 

1993

Dave

The Fugitive

Gettysburg

In the Line of Fire

In the Name of the Father

The Man Without a Face

Much Ado About Nothing

The Remains of the Day

Schindler's List

Shadowlands

 

1994

Clear and Present Danger

Ed Wood

Forrest Gump

Four Weddings and a Funeral

Immortal Beloved

Pulp Fiction

Quiz Show

The Shawshank Redemption

Speed

True Lies

 

1995

The American President

Apollo 13

Braveheart

The Brothers McMullen

Get Shorty

Heat

Moonlight and Valentino

Nixon

Sense and Sensibility

Toy Story

 

1996

The Daytrippers

The English Patient

Fargo

Flirting With Disaster

Hard Eight

Lone Star

Mother

Secrets and Lies

Star Trek: First Contact

A Time to Kill

 

1997

Air Force One

Amistad

Boogie Nights

Contact

The Game

Good Will Hunting

L.A. Confidential

The Sweet Hereafter

Switchback

Wag the Dog

 

1998

Bulworth

Elizabeth

Next Stop Wonderland

The Parent Trap

Pleasantville

Primary Colors

Ronin

Saving Private Ryan

A Simple Plan

There's Something About Mary

 

1999

Being John Malkovich

The Cider House Rules

The Green Mile

The Insider

The Limey

Mumford

Notting Hill

Office Space

Sleepy Hollow

The Straight Story

 

2000

Almost Famous

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Erin Brockovich

Gladiator

Memento

Requiem for a Dream

Return to Me

Thirteen Days

Traffic

Wonder Boys

 

2001

A Beautiful Mind

Heist

Kissing Jessica Stein

Life as a House

Monster's Ball

Moulin Rouge!

Mulholland Drive

The Royal Tenenbaums

The Shipping News

Shrek

 

2002

About Schmidt

Antwone Fisher

The Good Girl

The Hours

Laurel Canyon

The Pianist

Signs

Spider-Man

The Sum of All Fears

Tadpole

 

2003

American Splendor

Lost in Translation

Love Actually

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Mystic River

Open Range

Seabiscuit

Secondhand Lions

Something's Gotta Give

The Station Agent

 

2004

The Aviator

Crash

Garden State

Hotel Rwanda

The Incredibles

In Good Company

Million Dollar Baby

Shrek 2

Sideways

Silver City

 

2005

Batman Begins

Capote

Cinderella Man

The Constant Gardener

Good Night, and Good Luck

The Squid and the Whale

Syriana

The Thing About My Folks

Walk the Line

The World's Fastest Indian

 

2006

Casino Royale

Children of Men

The Da Vinci Code

The Departed

The Good German

Infamous

Letters From Iwo Jima

Pan's Labyrinth

The Queen

We Are Marshall

 

2007

American Gangster

The Bourne Ultimatum

Breach

In the Valley of Elah

Juno

Michael Clayton

No Country for Old Men

The Savages

The Visitor

You Kill Me

 

2008

Appaloosa

Body of Lies

The Dark Knight

The Express

Ghost Town

Gran Torino

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Iron Man

Last Chance Harvey

The Reader

 

2009

The Blind Side

Crazy Heart

The Hangover

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

Julie & Julia

Me and Orson Welles

Sherlock Holmes

Star Trek

State of Play

 

2010

127 Hours

Black Swan

The Fighter

The Ghost Writer

Inception

The Kids Are All Right

Shutter Island

The Social Network

True Grit

Winter's Bone

 

Edited by: fxreyman on Feb 21, 2011 12:19 AM

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I have a modern film to recommend to Fred. It is *Three Kings*, made in 1999, and set in Iraq, during the first Gulf War. It's only sort of a war film. I loved it when I first saw it, and on subsequent viewings. After I saw it, it struck me how much it had in common with *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre*. It's not a remake, but there are parallels in plot and the moral of the story.

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Hear hear!

 

Why indeed?

 

It seems Hollywood has been on the "remake" kick solidly for about 5 years now.

 

I'm waiting for them to do the film version of "My Mother The Car". (Um, if they haven't done it already.)

 

Say Hollywood, maybe you are running low on "buddy scripts" and "story ideas" from producer's kids.

 

You might try opening your mail someday.

 

Thx :)

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If I want to watch movies from the 90s, or 80s, or 70s, there are many other channels showing these movies, plus they are easily available at Netflix or on Ebay.

 

The point of TCM is being able to see movies that can't be seen anywhere else, and usually were never released on DVD or video! The early movies, the silents, the shorts, the B movies, the serials, the noir etc.

 

There is zero point to coming to TCM to see some nineties or 80s stuff that is remaindered on Ebay on DVD.

 

Showing these later movies is not widening anyone's horizons. It is narrowing horizons because then people can't see the early movies that are unavailable anywhere else.

 

TCM is not Showtime.

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Look, I'm sure that everyone who watches TCM watches it primarily for older films that aren't available elsewhere. And, that is primarily what they show. But, some of us aren't outraged when they show the occasional newer film, for 31 Days of Oscar, or when doing a tribute to an actor who continued making films past the 60s. That conforms to TCM's mission statement, and it's not likely to change. So, I see no point in continuing to gripe about it. Anyone who has a DVR can record enough of the older films to watch when TCM is showing a newer one. Obviously, no one has time to watch everything TCM shows. So, get over it!

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You think Erin Brockovich is a great movie? You think this is "widening your horizons?"

 

That's scary.

 

You aren't widening your horizons if you want TCM to show propaganda from the torts attorney trade to drum up business and try to give credibility to fantasy (as described by a relative who is a torts attorney) instead of early movies that can't be seen outside of TCM.

 

I sure hope that TCM doesn't become AMC or HBO/Showtime. Talk about narrowed horizons.

 

.

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If I want to watch movies from the 90s, or 80s, or 70s, there are many other channels showing these movies, plus they are easily available at Netflix or on Ebay.

 

The point of TCM is being able to see movies that can't be seen anywhere else, and usually were never released on DVD or video! The early movies, the silents, the shorts, the B movies, the serials, the noir etc.

 

There is zero point to coming to TCM to see some nineties or 80s stuff that is remaindered on Ebay on DVD.

 

Showing these later movies is not widening anyone's horizons. It is narrowing horizons because then people can't see the early movies that are unavailable anywhere else.

 

TCM is not Showtime.

 

Gosh, thank you for this post!!

 

My sentiments exactly!

 

Hey TCM, you had an original "charter".

 

At first you adheared to it.

 

I don't know what happened.

 

Nowadays (as right now) you come along with some excuse to play contemporary films. "31 Days Of Oscar".

 

So now we have to suffer movies made in the 80s, 90, 2000 plus... just because they won an Oscar?

 

Bit by bit you are going the way of AMC.

 

Soon it will be more accurate if you just name the station TM, "Turner Movies".

 

I have been a subscriber for 15 years and am sick of having to scan the cable for a classic movie while you guys found some reason to define "Footloose" as a "classic".

 

You need to fire some of your "ideas" people over there, start with that.

 

Thx :)

 

Edited by: Thx on Feb 21, 2011 3:56 AM

 

Edited by: Thx on Feb 21, 2011 3:58 AM

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Excuse me, I haven't posted here for ages until yesterday. What "griping" are you telling me to stop or "get over?"

 

It looks like perhaps you have an axe to grind.

 

You perhaps could be a lot more civil if you want to try to convince people they need to be watching movies remaindered on Ebay at TCM.

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A George Clooney movie.

 

You want TCM to show a George CLOONEY movie?

 

George Clooney has made a career out of political propaganda posing as "movies." The poor talentless soul would be long forgotten unless he were willing to sell himself out to special interest-funded vanity projects for political dogma.

 

I don't want to see 80s or 90s propaganda from the left or the right trying to pose as "art." I certainly don't want to pay for it, and I have to pay extra every month for TCM.

 

Please TCM, do not be sullied by a George Clooney movie:)

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> {quote:title=Thx wrote:}{quote}

 

> Hey TCM, you had an original "charter".

>

> At first you adheared to it.

>

> I don't know what happened.

 

That "charter" you have in mind never existed. As others have repeatedly pointed out, TCM's earliest advertising noted that films from the 1980s had a place on the channel.

 

> Nowadays (as right now) you come along with some excuse to play contemporary films. "31 Days Of Oscar".

 

It's been around for many years. It wasn't invented for that purpose. 45 films out of 350 isn't a big deal. This is the only month where post 60s films breach the 10% of the schedule line. In April you'll only see 16 films made after the sixties.

 

> So now we have to suffer movies made in the 80s, 90, 2000 plus... just because they won an Oscar?

 

TCM has played movies from the 80s since it first came on, 90s (few) and 2000s (very few) are likely to follow.

 

> Bit by bit you are going the way of AMC.

 

No, they aren't. It's not even remotely close.

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That "charter" you have in mind never existed. As others have repeatedly pointed out, TCM's earliest advertising noted that films from the 1980s had a place on the channel.

 

Nowadays (as right now) you come along with some excuse to play contemporary films. "31 Days Of Oscar".

 

It's been around for many years. It wasn't invented for that purpose. 45 films out of 350 isn't a big deal. This is the only month where post 60s films breach the 10% of the schedule line. In April you'll only see 16 films made after the sixties.

 

So now we have to suffer movies made in the 80s, 90, 2000 plus... just because they won an Oscar?

 

TCM has played movies from the 80s since it first came on, 90s (few) and 2000s (very few) are likely to follow.

 

Bit by bit you are going the way of AMC.

 

No, they aren't. It's not even remotely close.

 

Oh yes they are. They are going the way of AMC.

 

Bit by bit, we will see comercials and rotten original productions.

 

Okay, maybe they didn't have an original "charter", but in 1994 they certainly gave the inpressione it would be "classic movies, all the time".

 

So, I guess their "charter" was "we will play contemporary movies you might just as soon see on TNT."

 

So "Ferris Buehler's Day Off" is classic.... yeah, how did we end up here?

 

Stop making excuses for this pitifull, shabby exercise in greed.

 

Thx

 

Edited by: Thx on Feb 21, 2011 9:21 AM

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I tried to watch a movie on AMC last week. It was very difficult, not just because of the fact that they have commercials, but because of the abrupt way they cut to the commercials -- in mid scene, mid line even. That's really an insult to the film and the viewer and makes the films unpleasant to watch.

 

I don't think TCM is in danger of tarnishing its "mission". Sometimes I do get annoyed with the practice of having to put certain movies up at certain times of the year -- there was a big fuss on this board made by people who felt there weren't enough Christmas movies. And there are those who would make a fuss if there weren't war movies around Memorial Day.

 

Maybe the 31 days of Oscar concept can be dispensed with altogether. I do love *Lord of the Rings*, and wouldn't mind it being shown on TCM, except that it was just shown on another station. That's the point -- the newer stuff tends to get enough exposure; so part of the definition of"classic" for me is rarely shown movies, most of which tend to be older.

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> {quote:title=Thx wrote:}{quote}

>

*> Okay, maybe they didn't have an original "charter", but in 1994 they certainly gave the inpressione it would be "classic movies, all the time".* >

 

 

Thx, I'll point this out to you like I had to do for FredCDobbs:

 

take a moment to look at this link:

 

http://www.tcm.com/2009/15thAnniversary/index.jsp

 

And then:

 

1. When the years appear down at the bottom, click on 1994.

2. You will be taken to an image of a storefront saying "1994".

3. Click on the left side window, on the TCM logo.

4. It will then load a video

5. In the bottom right of the screen, you will see it says 1 of 7

6. Move your cursor up the right side to the arrow marked "NEXT"

7. Clcik on it until you get to the 3 of 7 screen.

8. Watch it.

 

It is _Robert Osborne's first movie intro on TCM_, and within the VERY FIRST MINUTE he says:

 

"...so, come join us and see not only great films and stars from the past *but also films from recent years featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars*."

 

So, there you go, the very first broadcast on TCM in 1994, telling you what they would show.

 

> {quote:title=Thx wrote:}{quote}

>> Stop making excuses for this pitifull, shabby exercise in greed.

 

Stop making accusations that, as you can see now, have no basis in fact.

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Fred, I don't understand you at all. Are you forgetful? Are you on medication? What, exactly? Why are you bringing this chart out again, when I already discussed it before (and I reprinted that discussion just a few minutes ago in the "This is Awful" thread...which you won't answer, anyway. But just for your sake, and for Thx, here is what I wrote (I can't believe I am having to do this again!):

 

#1: That is not a mission statement. That is advertising.

#2: It says the 1920s through the 1980s. You show what they advertised. Even show it with bright arrows pointing to the years. Yet you feel they are not being true to their "mission statement" by running movies that were made after the studio area, right? But they said the 1980s. So who is wrong, you or them? (Helpful hint, Fred: it's not them.)

#3: That was from 1995. It is now 2011. 16 years later. So the slide moves to the right to films after the 1980s as the years accumulate. And they have also moved the left side going back before 1920s..I don't hear you crying bloody murder they are untrue to what they said about that.

 

Fred, you have no arguments left that facts haven't already torn apart. Each time you bring that chart out, I will reprint what I wrote above. And I can also just as easily reprint that Robert O. said in his first broadcast in 1994 that they will run recent movies, too. Just give it a rest, okay?

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You know I have been sitting here trying to comprehend your posts and began to wonder if anything I wrote back to you would maybe change your mind. But now it has dawned on me that little of what I can write to you will change your mind or at least shed new light onto your thinking.

 

The reason for this is quite clear. You came to TCM expecting to see "classic" films from the golden age of movie-making, right?

 

Well if you knew what the original mission statement was for TCM, you'd realize that TCM shows films from all time periods. Mainly with a heavy dose of films made before 1960.

 

*Okay, maybe they didn't have an original "charter", but in 1994 they certainly gave the inpressione it would be "classic movies, all the time".*

 

Well, that is not entirely accurate. First of all going way back to when TCM first started, Robert Osborne came on the air to introduce the first prime time movie being shown on the channel. That film was 1939's Gone With the Wind" Osborne presented the film with what would become known as his "introduction" that we continue to see to this day.

 

But just before he made those remarks he spoke about what TCM was all about and he referneced movies and stars from yesteryear and also included movies and the stars of today. So even at the very beginning TCM showed newer films but still showed many many more older films. That has not changed.

 

There was at one time a mission statement that read something like this courtesy of long-time poster Filmlover:

 

With all this bellowing from the hilltops from a few here once again about what is classic and what does not belong on TCM, it got me searching for TCM's official definition. It was something I knew I posted here back in 2006. When someone argued here in the last day or so that TCM should remove the word "Classic" from their name, I knew it was time to reprint it.

 

This comes directly from a TCM brand notebook of that time:

 

*WHAT'S CLASSIC?*

*Is it old?*

*Can it be new?*

*Often, a classic is the best of its kind.*

*Sometimes, it's the worst.*

*Either way, it stands out.*

*A classic always stands out.*

*Classic can mean different things to different people.*

*Your parents idea of classic is probably different than yours.*

*Your kids idea of classic is probably different, too.*

*Everybody has a classic.*

*Sometimes classic means the original,*

*Or the best-known,*

*Or the first of its kind.*

*Sometimes it means one of a kind.*

*You could argue that classic is extreme:*

*The saddest of the sad,*

*The bravest of the brave,*

*The gosh-darn charmingest of the charming.*

*Of all the things classic is, the one thing it's not is one thing.*

*Classic is too big to be pinned down, too universal to be selfish.*

*Classic belongs to everybody.*

*Everybody has a classic.*

*Is it old? Yes.*

*Can it be new? Yes.*

*So, what's classic?*

*Turner Classic Movies.*

*THAT'S CLASSIC.*

 

The reason for this is quite clear. You came to TCM expecting to see "classic" films from the golden age of movie-making, right?

 

Here was your first post today at 4:38 AM:

 

*Well, after 15 years of subscription I am going to do more than complain.*

*I'm going to cancel my subscription.*

*I can catch "Pretty In Pink" and "Ferris Buehler's Day Off" on TNT.*

*(Funny you play those films, those were the first one's AMC played before they went to the dogs.)*

*Someday someone will come up with a truly classic movie station. I still have my hopes.*

*You know, I would like to have caught "Cannery Row".*

*But, you guys have been busy I know playing contemporary films, but for good reason.*

*A tribute to a "classic" director who made movies in the 60s, so lets play all his 80s, 90s, and 2000 movies too.*

*A tribute to a great director. (At the expense of the TCM viewers, millions of them.)*

*No TCM, you have let me down.*

*But, I'm sure you will make a lot of money.*

*I'm going IMDb.*

 

You have come back to the channel and the message boards after a long layoff? Because if you have indeed been around here for as long as you have indicated that you have then you are also quite aware that every year TCM salutes the Oscars in February (used to be March when the awards were telecast in March). I do not know why you are in such despair. TCM is continuing this month to showcase ALL films from ALL time periods that have been nominated for or have won an Oscar. You act so surprised.

 

So if you have come to TCM wanting to see those old chestnuts from the first half of the 20th century, chances are you are going to see quite a few of them. On average, TCM shows 350 films per month. And they show less than 10% newer films, films made after 1960. So on average that come s to about 35 newer films per month.

 

Now if you want to persist with a statement that TCM shows "Pretty in Pink" and "Porkys" by saying that you are very disappointed in their programming choices then you have every right to complain. But as it was pointed out to you TCM had a salute to Teen Movies. This occurred in July 2010. Every Thursday night TCM presented a different theme of movies about teens. But as you have indicated you are disappointed with TCM so you have decided to cancel your subscription.

 

The films included last July were:

 

Juvenile Delinquents:

Rebel Without a Cause 1955

Blackboard Jungle 1955

The Delinquents 1957

Crime in the Streets 1956

Hot Rods to Hell 1967

The Wild One 1954

 

At the Beach:

Gidget 1959

Beach Blanket Bingo 1955

Bikini Beach 1964

Where the Boys Are 1960

Girl Happy 1965

 

80's Night:

Better Off Dead 1985

Sixteen Candles 1984

Ferris Bueller's Day Off 1986

Risky Business 1983

Fame 1980

 

Teens in Love:

The Courtship of Andy hardy 1942

Tammy and the Bachelor 1957

Gregory's Girl 1981

Lord Love a Duck 1966

The Affairs of Dobey Gillis 1953

Palm Springs Weekend 1963

 

Rock movies:

Rock Rock Rock! 1956

Rock Around the Clock 1956

Bye Bye Birdie 1963

Jailhouse Rock 1957

Go, Johnny, Go! 1959

Don't Knock the Twist 1962

 

28 films in total for the tribute to teen films.

14 films are from the 1950s

7 films are from the 1960s

6 films are from the 1980s

1 film is from the 1940s

 

TCM did not play "Pretty in Pink" or "Cannery Row" but they did play "Ferris Bueller's Day Off". And you are right, you can see those films on commercial stations. What TCM was trying to do was to include a bunch of teen-themed movies as part of their monthly tribute to teen movies. "Ferris Bueller" and "Sixteen Candles" both directed by John Hughes were chosen for that particular evening of films.

 

Here was your second post today at 4:56 AM:

 

*When a station comes on and claims they play "classic" movies, we don't expect to be seeing "The Matrix".*

*They had a target audience: people who love movies of the 30s, 40s, 50s... okay 60s too.*

*And, like any other good thing they are screwing it up.*

*Probably for money.*

*Now, I'm sure that "Pretty In Pink" or "Porkey's" is a classic movie to their new, pimply-faced, 22 year old programming director. (Dom Delois' son.) because it was made before he was born, but for the ones who really believed the classic movie charter we are less than satisfied.*

*This is why I have cancelled my subscription.*

*I can see that programming anywhere, and loath it besides.*

*TCM, shame on you... I hope you go bust, you don't deserve to be successful.*

 

TCM has played "The Matrix" as part of it's salute to Oscar nominated films in the past, but not this year. So you obviously have decided to complain about this now not back when that film was shown originally. Sure TCM has a target audience, and those viewers like to watch films from every era. Not just "pre-1960" films. To you TCM is screwing things up. I guess by your opinion by showing less than 10% of post 1960 films on their schedule, that number is just not acceptable.

 

To me and many others here, TCM has not "screwed up". They continue to showcase many films made pre 1960 and they continue to show on average 10% or less per month of newer films. If TCM averages 350 films per month, and they show 10% or less of those films made after 1960, then that number they are showing is 35 films. But I guess people like you expect to find just older films here and not newer ones.

 

I have an idea..... Why don't you start up your own schedule of programming. If you feel the way you do about TCM. Or try and find another cable channel that shows just the type of films you want them to show. Pre-1960.

 

Because I have to tell you, you are not going to find any other channel like TCM. They do not exist. And their "charter" or "mission statement" never said anything about just showing films made pre-1960. Watch the video link below.

 

*http://www.tcm.com/2009/15thAnniversary/index.jsp*

 

Once there click on the 1994 year at the bottom of the page. You will then see an image of a storefront saying 1994. Then click on the large TCM logo that appears in the window on the left side. It will then load a video. On the bottom right you will see 1 of 7. Move your cursor up the right side to the arrow where it says next. Click on it until you get to 3 out of 7. Watch it.

 

This is Robert Osborne's first movie introduction he made for TCM. He introduces himself and then about 20 seconds in he states the following:

 

*".......so, come join us and see not only great films and stars from the past but also films from recent years featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars."*

 

So it would seem that from the very beginning it has been the stated purpose of TCM to show not only older films but more recent films. And because TCM prides itself in blocking out certain times of the month for special themes, every now and then you are going to see more recent films on the channel.

 

They could have a Robert Wise collection of sci-fi movies one evening. I can see that collection like this:

 

The Day the Earth Stood Still 1951

The Andromeda Strain 1971

Star Trek The Motion Picture 1979

 

But based on what I have seen coming from you, TCM shouldn't even show Andromeda or Star Trek. They are too recent, right? And you can see these two films elsewhere on the dial.

 

But I guess people like you will always find something to complain about. Instead of rejoicing that 90% of the films shown on TCM for eleven out of twelve months were films made before 1960, well I guess TCM has failed you. TCM should be showing nothing BUT films made before 1960, right? What about all of those who write hear that say nothing before 1950 should be shown?

 

Or before 1945? Where do you draw the line? I am quite willing to accept the position that any film from any time period could be called a "classic". Unfortunately there are those of you who persist that TCM has failed you and that you want your money back.

 

How sad.

 

message edited by fxreyman with help from filmlover.

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> {quote:title=WonderMoon wrote:}{quote}

> If I want to watch movies from the 90s, or 80s, or 70s, there are many other channels showing these movies, plus they are easily available at Netflix or on Ebay.

>

> The point of TCM is being able to see movies that can't be seen anywhere else, and usually were never released on DVD or video! The early movies, the silents, the shorts, the B movies, the serials, the noir etc.

>

> There is zero point to coming to TCM to see some nineties or 80s stuff that is remaindered on Ebay on DVD.

>

> Showing these later movies is not widening anyone's horizons. It is narrowing horizons because then people can't see the early movies that are unavailable anywhere else.

>

> TCM is not Showtime.

 

Well you make a valid point here. However, it has never been TCM's goal to just show films from one time period only. Many on this thread maintain that TCM was created to show films from before a certain point in time. That could not be farther from the truth.

 

Go back to their first evening of broadcasting and you will see Robert Osborne introducing himself to the audience for the first time. In his opening remarks he says that TCM is here to showcase films from the past and the present. The "present" he was referring to was not the early 1960s it was the mid 1990s. And since that evening TCM has updated the types of movies it shows and shows more films from the late 90s to the mid 2000s now.

 

Yes, many of the more recent films can be purchased from ebay or any other retail outlet. But not every recent film shown on TCM is available on other cable channels that are commercial free and uncut. You can go to TBS or AMC and watch any number of recently released films, but they aren't going to be shown commercial free and they ARE going to be shredded up so that they can fit into the desired time slot that those cable channels want to show them in.

 

If you look at my list I selected certain films that were of high quality production wise. Are they risque? Sure, many of them are. Now I am not advocating that all of these films be shown on TCM. I was responding to FredCDobbs about how he doesn't like many movies made after 1966 because they are no well made. To each his own, I guess, but then IMHO many films from the first half of the twentieth century weren't always made with the highest production values.

 

One last point, and this is a point LZCutter can make so much better than I. Many of the films you speak of have not yet been converted digitally. And that is one thing that all studios who own these films will need to do before they can air on TCM. And if you ask why, it was mandated by the feds a couple of years ago. This is something that must be done. So instead of complaining to TCM, my suggestion is for you to contact the various studios to get them to spend more money on converting these older films.

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> {quote:title=WonderMoon wrote:}{quote}

> You think Erin Brockovich is a great movie? You think this is "widening your horizons?"

>

> That's scary.

>

> You aren't widening your horizons if you want TCM to show propaganda from the torts attorney trade to drum up business and try to give credibility to fantasy (as described by a relative who is a torts attorney) instead of early movies that can't be seen outside of TCM.

>

> I sure hope that TCM doesn't become AMC or HBO/Showtime. Talk about narrowed horizons.

 

Again, check out my most recent reply to you about these films I selected.

 

As far as Erin Brockovich is concerned..... Iiked the film, one of the few films in recent history that at least was based in part on fact.

 

As far as your relative is concerned, have him name me one movie that has ever been made that has ever shown the total complete story about anything that has ever happened. No film in history has ever got the fact right 100% of the time. If they did, then the studio making the film must not have been concerned with making a profit.

 

I never said it was a great movie. I simply placed it on my list because of several factors:

 

1. The story was believable to me.

2. The production values were really good.

3. The characterizations were good, I felt that I could understand the people the movie was about based on the actor's portrayals.

4. I absolutely love the fact that this Brockovich lady took on this case without any background in the legal profession.

 

As far as TCM becoming AMC or any of the other cable channels..... That is not going to happen. And even if TCM continues to show 10% or less of their films monthly that were made after 1960, it is MHO that they should continue to show newer films.

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