Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Remakes and more remakes


Recommended Posts

I know this subject has been touched on before, but I want to expand it, if anyone's interested. In just a few minutes I jotted down 12 movies that have one, two, three or even four remakes.

 

This is what I'm intersted in hearing from other members:

 

1. How many remakes? Some have one remake with the same title: *Imitation of Life/Imiatation of Life*. Some have versions with different titles: *Rafter Romance/Living on Love*. Some have three versions or even four: *What Price Hollywood?/A Star is Born/A Star is Born/A Star is Born*.

 

2. Which version do you think is better/best? Why? It becomes difficult when a straight-out comedy/drama becomes a musical: *Shop Around the Corner/In the Good Old Summertime*.

 

Only fictional stories can be compared, not famous people or events. For example, the films about the Titanic are not remakes, just different stories based on the same subject.

 

Here are a couple examples of what I have in mind:

 

*Philadelphia Story/HighSociety*. *Philadelphia Story* wins hands down in my opinion. Very sophisticated and genuinly funny, it is well written, acted and directed. No one can top Hepburn, Grant and Stewart. It's a classic! *High Society*, the musical remake, has no memorable songs and the acting is so-so. The set design looks very dated especially in color. The only reason to watch is to look at Grace Kelly. She's gorgeous!

 

*These Three/The Children's Hour*. *The Clildren's Hour* is a second version and superior to the first. In the 1936 original *These Three*, the lesbian element was taboo, so it became essentially a different story. *The Children's Hour* is faithful to Lillian Hellman's play (even though the word "lesbian" was never spoken). Both versions have excellent casts. Very interesting that Miriam Hopkins is in both versions.

 

Would anyone like to discuss remakes? Compare and contrast?

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FilmAficionado wrote:}{quote}

> It's disappointing when a member's idea for a new thread gets no interest. I am enjoying this topic on TCM today. I never know until this afternoon that *The Maltese Falcon* was a third movie version.

 

FilmAficionado, you're right, it is a good thread idea and there's no earthly reason why it should have been ignored. Sometimes a thread, especially a new one, just sort of slides down the page as even newer threads are posted, and then it ends up on page 2 before people have even noticed it.

 

As to your original post, I don't entirely agree with everything you say. For instance, although I like *The Philadelphia Story* and prefer it to *High Society*, that remake is fun in its own right, and -here's where I mainly disagree with your comment about the two films - it definitely does have some memorable songs, including "Now You Has Jazz" (light but jazzy and enjoyable tune with Louis Armstrong -hey, it swings), "What a Great Party this is" (not sure I've got the title right), quite catchy and comical, with legendary singers Bing and Frank in a duet.

Best of all, *High Society* features the sweet, very melodic song, "True Love". This is quite simply, a lovely and very memorable ballad. George Harrison liked it so much he recorded his own version.

 

*Shop Around the Corner* versus its remake, *In the Good Old Summertime* ? The original, hands down. It doesn't get much more charming and romantic than James Stewart and Margaret Sullivan similtaneously sparring and flirting with each other. Also, unlike *High Society*, *Summertime* really doesn't have any memorable songs at all. In fact the music in it is annoying.

 

I've never seen the original *Maltese Falcon*, just the John Huston version. Would like to check out the other two you mentioned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well right now we have the second True Grit up for a number of awards tomorrow night the 1969 version was not. I saw part of Malice recently but think the first version, The Operation, is better. There?s High Sierra and Colorado Territory, the two Narrow Margins and other less known remakes. Sometimes, as in the case of The Maltese Falcon, remakes are good; other times, like that 1966 Stagecoach, it?s not. I guess they will always be with us.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Best of all, *High Society* features the sweet, very melodic song, "True Love". This is quite simply, a lovely and very memorable ballad.

>

> *Shop Around the Corner* versus its remake, *In the Good Old Summertime* ? The original, hands down. It doesn't get much more charming and romantic than James Stewart and Margaret Sullivan similtaneously sparring and flirting with each other. Also, unlike *High Society*, *Summertime* really doesn't have any memorable songs at all. In fact the music in it is annoying.

>

I appreciate your comments, misswonderly! I forgot about "Ture Love," that is a good song. As for *Summertime*, I guess I like anything that Judy Garland Sings! How about "I Don't Care."? That's good. But we don't have to agree. Friendly debate is fun, isn't it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=FilmAficionado wrote:}{quote}

 

> I've never seen the original *Maltese Falcon*, just the John Huston version. Would like to check out the other two you mentioned.

 

I've seen the Bette Davis-Warren William version, Satan Met a Lady (1936)--in fact I think it played on TCM a while back. It's interesting, if you are a Davis or Warren fan, but not as good I think. They play it as a comedy (sort of) and changed the names to protect the not-so-innocent. Alison Skipworth takes over the Sidney Greenstreet role, which sort of works, but the chemistry between Davis and Warren is just not good enough to make it work.

 

Though the more I think about it, the more I want to see it again. I kept comparing it in my mind to the 1941 version and that's not really fair--they may be based on the same story, but handle it very differently. Hmm...

 

Edited by: traceyk65 on Feb 26, 2011 9:27 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

If we're going to discuss remakes, how about the two versions of Holiday ? I have to say I prefer the 1938 version with Hepburn and Grant, just because I like the two of them, with their chemistry better than Ann Harding and whoever her co-star was (can't remember his name to save my life). I also love the way Lew Ayres plays the brother--he has just the right balance of sardonic and sadness to make you believe and want to save him. And I like that they expanded edward Everett Horton's role and added a part for Jean Dixon--I like her and they are funny, without the sometimes nasty edge that Hepburn's humor has (not her fault--it's written into the part, I believe). I do however, like Mary Astor as Julia better than Doris Nolan--she's prettier and sweeter-looking and I can beleieve Johnny fallin in love with her on a purely physical level better. Nolan looks so hard, I can;t believe Johnny would fall for her. (I think Aster vs Nolan was discussed on another thread somewhere?)

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FilmAficionado wrote:}{quote}

 

> 2. Which version do you think is better/best? Why? It becomes difficult when a straight-out comedy/drama becomes a musical: *Shop Around the Corner/In the Good Old Summertime*.

 

I think because I saw *In the Good Old Summertime* first, I hold it as a sentimental favorite over *Shop Around the Corner*, even though I love the latter as well. I'll throw in *You've Got Mail* just to round out this film's remake road, and although it can't even begin to touch the first two, it still has its moments here and there.

 

I mentioned *The Ladykillers* on another thread about worst films, as I found the remake unwatchable. No contest there. The original was pure genius, so much so that the remake just absolutely paled in comparison despite having Tom Hanks, who is one of my favorite actors. I just could not stay with the movie and had to turn it off after just a short time. Much like *Mr. Deeds* and *Mr. Deeds Goes to Town*. Absolutely no comparison, none at all.

 

But with *Seven Samurai* and *The Magnificent Seven* you have a remake undeniably worthy of its predecessor. I can watch both movies again and again. What tips *Magnificent Seven* just over the line is the movie score. Love it.

 

I only recently realized that *Marty* and *Only the Lonely* were one and the same. Both Ernest Borgnine and John Candy had the ability to pull at my emotional heartstrings, although I rate the original version as being superior to the remake.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I only like the original version of A STAR IS BORN. I prefer both IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME and HIGH SOCIETY to their original counterparts. Mainly, because I prefer the casts of the two latter, musical versions. And, I guess I should have quoted the OP here, because I forget what else it asked.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that at certain times a remake is warranted.

 

However in many cases the word "remake" is code for the studios when they do not have an original idea, hence an original story to film.

 

Take for example the feeble attempt at remaking the classic 1936 film, Mr Deeds Goes to Town. Columbia Pictures saw that the increased profile of Adam Sandler meant (to them) that they should take advantage of his new found popularity and remake their original, great Gary Cooper classic.

 

Two problems:

 

Adam Sandler is no Gary Cooper

 

and the movie was terrible, although it did very well at the theaters, raking in worldwide grosses of over $170 million as opposed to its cost of $50 million.

 

This was a feeble attempt by Columbia to make money off of a young, rising comedian by taking a great classic film and retooling it so as to fit the young star.

 

Edited by: fxreyman on Feb 27, 2011 2:34 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ernst Lubitsch remade THE MARRIAGE CIRCLE (1924) as ONE HOUR WITH YOU in 1932.

 

While I like THE MARRIAGE CIRCLE, I think that ONE HOUR WITH YOU is a much better film, the songs alone are wonderful and I think that Chevalier and MacDonald were a bit better in the lead roles than Monte Blue and Florence Vidor, although both Marie Prevost and Genevieve Tobin were terrific as Mitzi in their respective versions.

 

ONE WAY PASSAGE (1932) and 'TILL WE MEET AGAIN (1940), No comparison, William Powell and Kay Francis much better than Merle Oberon and George Brent. Don't get me wrong, I like Oberon and Brent, but Powell and Francis did this one better.

 

 

LADIES OF THE JURY (1932) and WE'RE ON THE JURY (1937), again the earlier one is better because of the casting. Edna May Oliver is delightful in the original. I like Helen Broderick, but she pales in comparison. Incidentally it was Broderick that also used to fill Edna's shoes as Hildegarde Winters in MURDER ON A BRIDAL PATH (1936)

 

I think it is a tough call on the two BEN HUR films, both have their good points, and I really don't see one as vastly superior to the other.

The same could be said for both versions of KING OF KINGS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*The Trespasser* was a smash for Gloria Swanson, but the remake, *That Certain Woman,* as a mediocre films starring Bette Davis.

 

There are 3 versions of *Smilin' Through.* The 1922 silent (as *Smiling Through*), offers nice star performances by Norma Talmadge and Harrison Ford. The talkie version starred Norma Shearer with Leslie Howard and Fredric March in a rather treacly version. Finally, Jeanette MacDonald tackled the story in 1941 with music.

 

*The Letter* was made in 1929 with Jeanne Eagels (her stage hit) and later with Bette Davis.

 

The first version of *Mutiny on the Bounty* is much better than its remakes thanks to Charles Laughton.

 

Clark Gable starred in both *Red Dust* with Jean Harlow and Mary Astor and its remake, *Mogambo,* with Ava Gardner and Grace Kelly.

 

The silent *Scaramouche,* starring Ramon Novarro is far better than its remake.

 

*Love Affair* started out with Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer, turned into *An Affair to Remember* with Deborah Kerr and Cary Grant, and finally back to *Love Affair* with Annette Bening and Warren Beatty.

 

*Stella Dallas* started out as a silent with Belle Bennett, turned into a smashing talkie with Barbara Stanwyck, and finally into just plain *Stella* with Bette Midler.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I much prefer the original 1927 silent Ben-Hur to the remake with Heston, which....frankly...I've never liked. The original is much more exciting to me.

 

The 1937 A Star Is Born is the one and only for me. Never cared for any of the remakes, even the Garland version (highly overrated, IMHO).

 

Never liked High Society....I find The Philadelphia Story FAR more entertaining.

 

To me, Fredric March IS Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I have several versions of the story on video, but given a choice I'd take March's Oscar-winning version over any other. Never especially cared for Spencer Tracy's version.

 

Can't say on King of Kings...haven't seen either one in years. For telling the story of Jesus in old-Hollywood style, I like The Greatest Story Ever Told. Got the chance about 30 years ago to see an original 70mm print, and it blew me away.

 

Have also never seen any version of The Maltese Falcon other than the one with Bogart. Impossible to judge without seeing the earlier versions, but can't imagine any other version being any better.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> I much prefer the original 1927 silent Ben-Hur

 

[Technically, the 1925 version is not the original|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cf2DN1KEyks].

 

;-)

 

Edited by: Fedya on Feb 28, 2011 10:45 PM, because this forum's thoroughly broken software won't let you use an apostrophe in the name of a link

Link to post
Share on other sites

*The Letter was made in 1929 with Jeanne Eagels (her stage hit) and later with Bette Davis.*

 

Let's not forget the sort-of remake with Ann Sheridan, THE UNFAITHFUL (1947).

 

*Clark Gable starred in both Red Dust with Jean Harlow and Mary Astor and its remake, Mogambo, with Ava Gardner and Grace Kelly.*

 

And between them, Ann Sothern was CONGO MAISIE, which was basically a remake of RED DUST.

 

I really prefer 1939's THE RAINS CAME over its remake . . . especially with a cast that includes Myrna Loy, Tyrone Power, George Brent and Brenda Joyce, among others, and the special effects: the earthquake and flood, were quite good for their time.

 

Although I enjoy the remake: 1955's Cinemascope epic, THE RAINS OF RANCHIPUR, with Lana Turner, Richard Burton, Michael Rennie, and Joan Caulfield, I think Fred MacMurray is miscast as the drunk American. Think of Errol Flynn in that role . . . would have most likely been similar to his subsequent roles in THE SUN ALSO RISES, TOO MUCH TOO SOON and THE ROOTS OF HEAVEN. So what if the character was American in the original, they changed Lady Esketh (Loy, Turner) from British to American, so they could have done the reverse for the wastrel. Alos, the special effects seem kind of cheesy in color and widescreen.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...