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The Worst Film I've Ever Seen


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I found *Pulp Fiction* rather lame. When you can appreciate films such as *Cannibal Holocaust* and *Pieces*, a maintstream cartoony attempt at that kind of trash is just a bore.

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I love *Pulp Fiction* ! It's actually one of my favourite movies ( of course, we're talking about a list of at least a hundred titles...)

I will concede that it is very violent in parts, and in that respect quite distasteful to many. But I found it to be an exhilarating experience, the first time I saw it, and I still get hooked every time I see it.

 

I love the way Quentin Tarantino plays with time and structure in the film; he's not the first to do this of course, but he does it so well. it's like a fascinating cinematic puzzle that he invites the audience to piece together.

Much has been said about the dialogue in *Pulp Fiction*, most of it good. The dialogue by all characters is exceptionally clever, funny, impassioned- all this, and yet it sounds like the way people really talk ! (lots of swearing, but many people do cuss that much.)

The characters, even the "bad" ones, engage my attention and empathy - I want to know what happens to them all, what will they do next.

And - I realize this will sound like b.s. to many, but this is my theory - in its own way, it has a moral logic to it. The Samuel Jackson character gives some careful thought to the kind of life he has led, genuinely decides to reform, and lives ; the John Travolta character gives not a moment's reflection to his amoral ways, and pays for it with his life - an unexamined life. Maybe a little far-fetched, but it makes sense.

 

When Bruce Willis has a chance to escape his vile perverted sadistic captors , he can't. He has to turn back and rescue his enemy, the very man who'd been trying to kill him earlier that same day.

It is in fact a truly moral decision, and one the character did not have to make.

 

On top of all this, *Pulp Fiction* treats us to an absolutely dynamite soundtrack, beginning with that jaw-dropping opening sequence, the two amateur thieves and lovers freeze-framed on that diner table-top, guns pointing, the urgent surf guitar strains of "Misirlou" pulling us into the movie. This film features fabulous songs throughout, they must have been hand-picked by the director.

 

I feel that all the above delights, (and I didn't go into all of them) more than compensate for the ultra-violence and nastiness that admittedly comprise a major element of this movie.

 

...and I didn't even mention Harvey Keitel as "Mr. Wolf".

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 17, 2011 5:47 PM

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I feel that all the above delights, (and I didn't go into all of them) more than compensate for the ultra-violence and nastiness that admittedly comprise a major element of this movie.

 

That's my feeling as well. I'm one who is usually offended by excessive violence, and in fact, that element hurts this otherwise fine movie. A better choice would have been to step back from that and focus on the quirky story. But with so much going for it, I'm very much in the pro camp for this creative, unpredictable, unforgettable comedy. And that soundtrack! A Chuck Berry song I've loved for about fifty years. Is it called "You Never Can Tell"? I hope so. I can't spell the French words!

 

Another thread reminded me of a solid candidate for worst movie of all time. THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE and the poor suckers who paid eight dollars to see it! I won't repeat everything I said elsewhere. But this is an unbelievably horrible piece of...

 

OK. I'm done!

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The dance contest, yeah...Chuck Berry's You Never Can Tell, also known as C'est La Vie

( "That's Life" ). I want to dance like that. In fact, wouldn't if be fun if at the upcoming TCM Film Festival they had a dance-a-thon, and everybody, Robert Osborne, Ben Mankiewicz, whatever staff are present, and all TCM guests, got up and grooved away to this !

 

 

 

(For those who don't know what I'm talking about, it's the dancin' scene in *Pulp Fiction* Very cool.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 17, 2011 6:00 PM

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 17, 2011 10:42 PM

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I watched all four Jeanne d'Arc films-hey, she was French, not English-and agree I liked the Shaw version with Jean Seberg the least The best-imagine that-was the 1928 silent version. That actress's plain face but big beautiful eyes and soulful expressions made her seem the most realistic. She needed no words and the subtitles from the trial transcript combined with the music made it first rate. I loved that the movie paralleled Jeanne's life-put down by the church, burned, then discovered in the last place expected, restored and this time welcomed by church and state. The last one-also French-came in second. The Bergman version was so-so but that was not her fault. I guess some folks thought it was overkill but how else can you really compare versions? As to the worst of all time for me, I have to think about that a bit

.

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Dirty dancing

 

When I saw this movie, I was on a date and I am embarrassed to admit that I made out during the entire movie. When I went home I told my mom I hated it, mainly so I didn't,t have to give too many details. My mom loves movies and always wants details. After this embarrassing incident I did see the movie and I did hate it. I hate Pretty Woman too...but I didn't make out during that one.

 

Lisa...who keeps getting booted out of the new and improved TCM website

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Another defense of *PULP FICTION*: As Samuel L. Jackson pointed out, there were more murders in the seemingly benign *BULLETS OVER BROADWAY* (released by the same studio in the same year) than in *PULP FICTION.* Also, *PULP FICTION* is divided into three stories, all of which end up with at least one character's life being saved. So there actually is a heart to this film, for those who are willing to excavate in their search for it. I'm not a big noir person, but *PULP FICTION* would get my vote as the best film of the 1990s.

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> {quote:title=phroso wrote:}{quote}

> Another defense of *PULP FICTION*: As Samuel L. Jackson pointed out, there were more murders in the seemingly benign *BULLETS OVER BROADWAY* (released by the same studio in the same year) than in *PULP FICTION.* Also, *PULP FICTION* is divided into three stories, all of which end up with at least one character's life being saved. So there actually is a heart to this film, for those who are willing to excavate in their search for it. I'm not a big noir person, but *PULP FICTION* would get my vote as the best film of the 1990s.

 

Thank you, phroso, for posting such an articulate and insightful message about one of my favourite movies. Too often people make assumptions about a movie and base their opinion of it on what they've heard about it, or they are so put off by something in the film they don't like that they can't relax enough to see anything in it that they might like if they gave it a chance.

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I give! I will do my bestest to watch this cinematic wonder the next time I can. With your lovely critique, I really feel that we're missing something special. I didn't even watch long enough to see Harvey. And to iloveold, Dirty Dancing is one of MY favorites, but I think it is a movie that you either love or hate. And did you not look at Patrick? What's not to love?

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I hate *DIRTY DANCING,* but my dislike largely stems from an incident over 20 years ago, in which my then-girlfriend admitted that she had rented the film while "re-uniting" with her ex. I still can't be objective about *DIRTY DANCING.* It just sucks.

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Based on posts here I think most people define "worst film" as "most over-rated film." I tend to do that myself--if everybody hates a movie there's no sense of outrage over its lameness. It's when others love a film that we tend to get worked up. On that note I nominate "The Night of the Hunter." I am always totally mystified at the critical adulation heaped on this hammy, overwrought, silly film.

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> {quote:title=redriver wrote:}{quote}

> I feel that all the above delights, (and I didn't go into all of them) more than compensate for the ultra-violence and nastiness that admittedly comprise a major element of this movie.

>

> That's my feeling as well. I'm one who is usually offended by excessive violence, and in fact, that element hurts this otherwise fine movie.

 

I'm not offended by excessive violence. I am offended when such brutal, evil violence is depicted as hip, stylish, and fun. But I still can't call *Pulp Fiction* one of the worst films made, even though I don't like it, because it IS well made.

 

> Another thread reminded me of a solid candidate for worst movie of all time. *THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE* and the poor suckers who paid eight dollars to see it! I won't repeat everything I said elsewhere. But this is an unbelievably horrible piece of...

>

 

It's not my very favorite Peter Greenaway film (one of my favorite directors,) but it is an excellent film, with a fine cast - Michael Gambon, Helen Mirren, to name two.

 

One of the worst films I have seen is *Anaconda*. The closest thing to something good I can say about the film is that Jon Voight manages to seem more like a real snake than the CGI snake does.

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phroso, I am so sorry you must associate DD with such a bad experience! I love it all the more because my husband and I were young and so much in love. And my girlfriends and I had a work seminar away, and of course the music was playing in the bar that night. I couldn't wait to get back to my hubby. We're still together, 3l years now, and I can still watch it often. He doesn't care that much for it, but it's very sentimental to me. I'm not crazy about Jennifer Grey, but the scene in the cottage with Patrick is one of the sexious love scenes I have ever seen. Did you know that Patrick and Jennifer had had a big fight and didn't want to do the move together? He did not enjoy kissing her in that scene, it was clearly written on his face, but he carried it off. And the music and the dancing were spectacular. Makes me long for youth and strength.

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jbh, I think DD is one of those movies that divide men and women. I've never heard of a man who liked it. Being as objective as I can, I at least understand why it's so popular, but, at best, it's still not my cup of tea. Congratulations on your 31 years of marriage, btw.

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There are so many "worst" films from recent years that I'll restrict it to the TCM era

 

Most overrated movies: Bonnie & Clyde, Citizen Kane -- all technique and no substance

 

Lamest screwball: Miracle of Morgan's Creek (and Sturges is my favorite screwball director)

 

Most godawful musical: The Sound of Music, Gold Diggers of 1935 (the 1933 version was a gem)

 

Most overrated screen couple: Tracy and Hepburn (Her movies with Grant are much better)

 

Most overrated genre: American-made World War II epics - 90% of the good ones are foreign-made

 

And worst movie, period: Last Tango in Paris - I'll take my butter on toast, thanks

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Thanks so much, phroso, and I absolutely agree with you. But there are many women who vehemently loathe the movie, mostly because it's so "dirty." Give me that type of entertainment over GLEE any time.

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ValentineX wrote of *Pulp Fiction* :

 

"...I'm not offended by excessive violence. I am offended when such brutal, evil violence is depicted as hip, stylish, and fun. But I still can't call Pulp Fiction one of the worst films made, even though I don't like it, because it IS well made...."

 

But, see, I don't think the "brutal evil violence" is depicted as "hip, stylish, and fun". I do think Tarantino is distancing himself and the audience from the violence, rendering it "cartoony". This is also what he did in the two *Kill Bill* movies. It's a tendency of his that I don't particularly like; in fact, for me, the jury is always out on Quentin Tarantino. I keep changing my mind about him (although not about *Pulp Fiction* .)

I do think that most of the violence in *Inglourious Basterds* is repellent ( I mean, even more so than usual ) and much of it unnecessary (for example, the scene in which Pitt and his henchmen are " questioning" Diane Kruger. And she's even on their side ! )

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 20, 2011 3:04 PM

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 20, 2011 3:09 PM

got mixed up on that "the jury's still out" expression. I thought it was "the verdict's still out". Oh well, you catch my drift...

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