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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> *A little touchy, are we, lazycutter? I know your tactics. You're trying to coax the mod into banning.*

>

> They don't need any coaxing, you are doing a find job all on your own.

 

I am going to be here for a very long time. ;)

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If you are indeed going to be around here for a while then might I suggest you start doing your homework before berating artists like George Lucas. It is visionaries like Lucas who have been able to take us places where, to borrow a phrase from my favorite television show......

"To boldy go where no man has gone before."

 

Don't be so quick to make judgments about people who have been able to help establish wonderful effects for movies that thirty-five years ago, were not available. To make that kind of judgment against Lucas is to also condemn the likes of some of the early (late 1870s to early 1900s to later film visual artists) that I am sure at the time caused people like you to also squirm a bit in their seats because progress was coming.

 

Eadweard Muybridge who famously photographed The Horse in Motion in 1878.

 

Thomas Edison's assistant William K.L. Dickson filmed his first experimental Kinetoscope trial film, Monkeyshines No. 1.

 

One of Thomas Edison's first film strips on celluloid, filmed to be viewed on his invention called the kinetoscope, a device for viewing moving pictures without sound, and patented in 1887.

 

The first known (and only surviving) film with live-recorded sound made to test Edison's Kinetophone (with a cylinder-playing phonograph and connected earphone tubes) was this 17-second short film.

 

This was the first special effect (in-camera), reportedly, of the controversial execution (decapitation) of Mary, Queen of Scots (Robert Thomae) on the execution block, using a dummy and a trick camera shot (substitution shot or "stop trick").

 

French filmmaker and trickster Georges Melies, known as the 'Father of Cinematic Special Effects,' created his first special effect in this short film.

 

Grandma's Reading Glass. This innovative two-minute short film from British film-maker George Albert Smith exploited the camera's capacity for magnification by employing a series of closely-scaled shots within a narrative framework.

 

A Railway Collision (1900). Director W.R. Booth and producer Robert W. Paul (Paul's Animatograph Works) made this short 22-second film - one of the earliest attempts to realistically re-create a large-scale railroad disaster by using miniature scale models; the film depicted two trains speeding toward each other on the same track, and colliding on the embankment.

 

A Trip to the Moon (1902). Turn-of-the-century Frenchman/magician Georges Melies developed the art of magical special effects (and film editing) in earlier films and then perfected them and used them in later films, such as in this classic and pioneering science-fiction film - a 14 minute ground-breaking masterpiece (nearly one reel in length (about 825 feet)

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, 1982 The ILM computer graphics division develops "Genesis Effect", the first use of fractal-generated landscape in a film.

 

The Great Train Robbery (1903). Edwin S. Porter's landmark 10-minute dramatic film was a primitive one-reeler action picture. It was the first to use a number of innovative, modern film techniques, many of them for the first time, such as parallel editing, minor camera movement, jump-cuts and cross-cuts, location shooting and less stage-bound camera placement.

 

The Ten Commandments (1923). This early Cecil B. DeMille epic used primitive special effects techniques - the parting of the Red Sea was accomplished by filming water as it poured down two sides of a U-shaped tank, and then running the film backwards - to make the water appear to divide.

 

The Thief of Bagdad (1924). This classic Arabian nights tale by director Raoul Walsh used state of the art, revolutionary visual effects (for its smoke-belching dragon and underwater spider, to the flying horse, the famed flying carpet, and magic armies arising from the dust) and displayed legendary production design.

 

Metropolis (1927). Fritz Lang significantly advanced the art of using elaborate model miniatures to create vast city-scapes. In the film's opening, animated airplanes fly above the futuristic city filled with more animated automobiles. Other perspective techniques created the illusion of distance and size. The film also employed matte paintings, complex compositing, and back or rear projection (the scene of ruling Master Joh Fredersen (Alfred Abel) speaking to his foreman Grot on a video-phone TV screen).

 

The Invisible Man (1933). This film showcased early attempts at visual/special effects by double-exposing and overlaying elements together, using both live physical effects and traveling-matte photography. In the film's final scene, the invisible man Jack Griffin (Claude Rains) died - and as he expired, his face was slowly revealed and became visible by stages - first the skull, then flesh, and then his full face. It was a startling effect for audiences.

 

King Kong (1933). Showcased Willis O'Brien's masterful, detailed stop-action animation and special effects of monster ape Kong and the prehistoric dinosaurs. He synthesized matte paintings, miniatures (usually an 18-inch tall Kong), rear projection, and stop-motion animation. FX scenes included the fight-to-the-death scene of Kong with a Tyrannosaurus Rex and with a pterodactyl, and the finale - Kong's own death atop New York's Empire State Building. Because Kong's fur was pushed down every time animators handled him for the stop-motion photography, his skin appeared to ripple as a result.

 

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). This film was Disney's remarkable, groundbreaking, 83-minute masterpiece - the first full-length, hand-drawn animation. The film won an honorary Academy Award for Walt Disney "as a significant screen innovation which has charmed millions and pioneered a great new entertainment field."

 

Citizen Kane (1941). This highly-rated classic masterpiece from director-star-producer Orson Welles brought together many cinematic and narrative techniques and experimental innovations (in photography, editing, and sound) to reconstruct the title character like building a jigsaw puzzle; the innovative, bold film is still an acknowledged milestone in the development of cinematic technique, although it 'shared' some of its techniques from many earlier films.

 

A Matter of Life and Death (1946). A technical marvel with Jack Cardiff's exquisite cinematography, this UK film included an early use of the freeze-frame (of the table tennis ball frozen in mid-air), the lengthy, monumental and endless staircase linking heaven and earth, the panoramic view of the heavenly court room, and the inventive transitions from Technicolor to black and white.

 

The collective of films by Ray Harryhausen. Many wonderful fantasy films contained the incredible special effects and stop-motion animation - and lifelike creatures of Ray Harryhausen, a protege of Willis O'Brien. He pioneered the development of a split-screen technique called Dynamation -- (rear projection on overlapping miniature screens) -- that brought real-life to combined scenes of animation and live-action.

 

Often partnered with Charles H. Schneer, his classic films with stop-motion animation and other special effects included: The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) (his first solo film), It Came From Beneath the Sea (1955), 20 Million Miles to Earth (1957), all the Sinbad films (including The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958) - Harryhausen's first split-screen film shot entirely in color, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1974), and Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977)), The Three Worlds of Gulliver (1959), Mysterious Island (1961), Jason and the Argonauts (1963) - with the spectacular stop-motion sword-wielding skeletons scene, The First Men in the Moon (1964), and most recently, Clash of the Titans (1981).

 

The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). Featuring state-of-the-art visual effects and seamless model miniatures, it was also the first science-fiction film to feature "flying saucers" and the first true robot, Gort.

 

War of the Worlds (1953). This film was the winner of the Best Achievement in Special Effects Academy Award, by producer George Pal, for its vivid depiction of the invasion of the Earth by Martians. This was the first visual effects-laden "popcorn" film, featuring vibrant color special effects, and the destruction of various cities and landmarks, including the famous Los Angeles Courthouse Building.

 

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954). The fanciful Richard Fleischer-directed Disney film based upon the Jules Verne book of the same name, with James Mason as Captain Nemo, won the Academy Award for Special Effects; it was notable for its depiction of the Nautilus and the giant squid fight. One of the other nominated films in the category was Them! (1954), a typical mid-50s B-monster film with giant ants invading Los Angeles.

 

Forbidden Planet (1956). One of the landmark science-fiction films of the 50s was this classic space adventure film from director Fred Wilcox - an adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest. It was the first science-fiction film in color and CinemaScope. Its Oscar-nominated Special Effects included miniatures (e.g., the spaceship), innovative set and art decoration (with soundstage scenic paintings), and matte paintings to create the alien environment of Altair IV.

It also included the famed friendly servant prop (probably the most expensive, intricately-wired film prop ever constructed at the time (at $125,000)) -- Robby the Robot, also used as a prop in MGM's The Invisible Boy (1957) a year later. The film also featured an all-electronic music score.

One of the best remembered segments was the 'animated' night attack (using hand-drawn cel animation) of the ID monster on the flying saucer spaceship - in actuality, it was displaying Dr. Morbius' (Walter Pidgeon as Prospero) face-to-face encounter with his own projected sub-conscious, incestuous feelings for his lovely young daughter Altaira (Anne Francis).

 

Fantastic Voyage (1966). This science-fiction classic film - the winner of the year's Academy Award for Best Achievement in Special Visual Effects, told of an expedition by miniaturized human beings into the bloodstream of a human body, within a high-tech military submarine (full-sized in actuality) that was shrunk to microbial dimensions. The interior of the scientist's body was created by using large, highly-detailed sets of various body parts (i.e., the brain, the heart). Through various techniques, the explorers were seen swimming through the body (the actors were suspended on wires).

 

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). The Star Gate and Star Child sequence and other special effects helped this revolutionary and pioneering film win the Academy Award for Best Achievement in Special Visual Effects. Stanley Kubrick's film featured the most realistic footage of space ever created - and it's still not dated by the passage of time. Miniature models of spacecraft, timer or manually-guided pre-motion control cameras, rear-projection (for the film's many video displays and computer monitors), full-sized props or models (such as the 30-ton rotating "ferris wheel" set of the spaceship), and other early techniques (such as a primitive type of "Go-Motion") were used.

 

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977). This Spielberg film was notable for the sequence of the landing of the impressive alien mother ship - a 400 lb. fiber-glass model that was four feet high and five feet wide. The UFO model was wired and lighted by fiber optics, incandescent bulbs, and neon tubes. This film lost the Best Achievement in Visual Effects Academy Award to Star Wars (1977).

 

Star Wars (1977). The trench-run made by Luke Skywalker was the first extensive use of animated 3-D computer animation (or CGI).

 

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982). The so-called "Genesis Effect" - a one-minute animated sequence, was cinema's first entirely computer-generated (CG) sequence. This visual effect marked the first use of a fractal-generated landscape in a film, and a particle-rendering system (to achieve its fiery effect). It was created by the LucasFilm division of Pixar at ILM.

 

Tron, 1982 The extensive use (15 min. fully computer generated) of 3D CGI including the famous Light Cycle sequence. Also includes very early facial animation (for the Master Control Program).

 

The Last Starfighter, 1984 Uses CGI for all spaceship shots, replacing traditional models. First use of 'integrated CGI' where the effects are supposed to represent real world objects.

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"babydiapers" wrote in response to ValentineXavier:

 

"See what I mean about decline of culture and literacy? The word is "repudiate", toots. Look it up. "

 

"babydiapers", if you had spent any time reading these boards before you decided to start posting on them, you would know that ValentineXavier is a very smart and very informed participant on this fansite, and would be far too aware to make such a mistake. As Val himself pointed out, he was using a silly non-word on purpose . As far as I can tell from reading his comments on these forums, he is very cultured and very literate, kind of the opposite of what you imply.

But Val doesn't need me to defend him. If you start reading these forums with an open mind, you'll see that 99.9 % of the people who read and write on these boards are very well-informed and very smart.

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> {quote:title=babydiapers wrote:}{quote}

> Oh dear, I really tire of having to read these dreary apologia for current movies and culture.

>

> I stopped going to the cinema about 5 years ago. It finally dawned on me that I would leave the theatre with an empty feeling, as if I'd just wasted the previous 2 hours of my life.

>

> Its different when I watch old movies (those completed prior to 1949.) Its not just that they knew their craft better, and concentrated on dialogue and meaning rather than special effects, T&A and trying to launch the next catch-phrase. Its that they were from a different time. I can escape the wretchedness of contemporary culture (or lack thereof.) I feel a closer connection to those people who lived all those years ago, and who mercifully died before witnessing the decline of civilization.

>

> If you people want to continue to blind yourselves to the cultural decimation all around you, well, I guess you can't be stopped. But you are part of the problem. And I repudiate you for it.

 

 

Ok, but if you have such respect and affection for classic movies and the time and culture that engendered them, why did you chose to give yourself the appelation " babydiapers", with the inevitable connotations that phrase entails? Do you think a person from the 1940s or '50s would have given themselves an assumed name like that? If you think the era you profess to admire had so much class, why did you give yourself a screen name like that? I'm just askin' ....

 

ps - just an afterthought...good thing you didn't decide to call yourself " ADULTdiapers"..guess it depends.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Feb 27, 2011 2:20 PM

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Feb 27, 2011 4:28 PM

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babydiapers wrote:

 

A little touchy, are we, lazycutter? I know your tactics. You're trying to coax the mod into banning.

 

lzcutter replied:

 

They don't need any coaxing, you are doing a find job all on your own.

 

babydiapers replied:

 

I am going to be here for a very long time.

 

Fxreyman replies to babydiapers:

 

No one is disputing that fact of yours.

 

Babydiapers wrote this recently:

 

Oh dear, I really tire of having to read these dreary apologia for current movies and culture.

 

I stopped going to the cinema about 5 years ago. It finally dawned on me that I would leave the theatre with an empty feeling, as if I'd just wasted the previous 2 hours of my life.

 

Its different when I watch old movies (those completed prior to 1949.) Its not just that they knew their craft better, and concentrated on dialogue and meaning rather than special effects, T&A and trying to launch the next catch-phrase. Its that they were from a different time. I can escape the wretchedness of contemporary culture (or lack thereof.) I feel a closer connection to those people who lived all those years ago, and who mercifully died before witnessing the decline of civilization.

 

*If you people want to continue to blind yourselves to the cultural decimation all around you, well, I guess you can't be stopped. But you are part of the problem. And I repudiate you for it.*

 

Fxreyman replies to the above:

 

If in your last paragraph you mean to accuse us all of being apologists for recent movies or as you put it: "the cultural decimation", then I think your comments do not belong on a movie message board. These types of incendiary comments belong on an anthropology or sociology message board. Your comments are way over the top, don't you think?

 

We all here love the movies. Period.

 

There are those of us who like movies from every era. Some only like silents. Some only like 30's comedies, some like westerns, some like, well you get the picture.

 

TCM is like a BIG TENT. It allows for everyone to participate writing and discussing and some times arguing about the movies. But we try to do this with respect toward one another.

 

Sometimes when we see a poster like you who seems to us to be here for whatever reason you have, it could be to argue your point only, or you may feel that if others do not agree with you then you might feel the need to write what you wrote above. I do not know what your intentions are when you write stuff like that. Well, then we get a little touchy.

 

However, if you had chosen the words of your argument a little better and with a little more care and thoughtfulness, then you may not have seen any negative comments come back your way.

 

This is only a suggestion not an attack.

 

Message edited by Fxreyman

 

Edited by: fxreyman on Feb 27, 2011 1:09 PM

 

Edited by: fxreyman on Feb 27, 2011 1:25 PM

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> "babydiapers" wrote in response to ValentineXavier:

>

> "See what I mean about decline of culture and literacy? The word is "repudiate", toots. Look it up. "

>

> "babydiapers", if you had spent any time reading these boards before you decided to start posting on them, you would know that ValentineXavier is a very smart and very informed participant on this fansite, and would be far too aware to make such a mistake. As Val himself pointed out, he was using a silly non-word on purpose . As far as I can tell from reading his comments on these forums, he is very cultured and very literate, kind of the opposite of what you imply.

 

Such a wonderful testimonial, I had to see it in print again... :)

 

But, I DO make mistakes. I made a whopper in the *Bad Seed* thread a few days ago, confusing the names of the actresses who played the mother and daughter.

 

It would seem that babydiapers is not as culturally literate as he thinks he is, or he would have recognized "refudiate," as it was so much in the news, just a few months ago. The New Oxford American Dictionary named it "word of the year," last November, so I guess it'll be in the dictionary soon.

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"Everyone is entitled to air their opinions here. And I've been more than respectful despite the very rude, hostile, snarky reception I've received from 90% of the regulars around here, and that includes you, so you can get down off your high horse, now."

 

Sounds like your diapers are full. They need to be changed. :)

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