Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Movie Credits - and a pet peeve


Recommended Posts

I've noticed sometimes that the credits-order on imdb and the credits in the movie I'm watching don't always jibe. I understand that there are different releases of movies so I suppose sometimes the credits get re-arranged.

 

My pet peeve is the movie credits listed in the Schedule that don't reflect the actual stars. The one that comes to mind is Night Must Fall (1937). The star is Robert Montgomery who is not even mentioned. In fact he was even nominated as Best Actor. His co-star was Rosalind Russell who is listed fourth.

 

When I scan the schedules I always look at the title and then the stars. That makes it a lot easier to decide if I've seen it or want to.

 

I wonder if there's any way to get the powers that be to change that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

What I'd like to know is what was the first film to usher in the modern practice of listing every damn credit at the end of a film and why was that started? And WHAT THE HELL IS A GAFFER? I used to think that GAFFER was another movie word for either GEEZER = oh great, now films are hiring old guys to act as proffesional Kibbitzers on movie sets or GOFER = the guy or gal that would run and get coffee and sandwiches for everyone on the set.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> What I'd like to know is what was the first film to usher in the modern practice of listing every damn credit at the end of a film and why was that started?

 

I'll take a wild guess and say it was "Star Wars". Don't know why it was started.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> What I'd like to know is what was the first film to usher in the modern practice of listing every damn credit at the end of a film?

>

I'm sure it was a gradual process starting in the mid-1960's with the listings getting longer all the time. It didn't start with just one movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This explanation is from Wikipedia:

 

The use of closing credits in film to list complete production crew and cast was not firmly established in American film until the 1970s. Before this decade, most movies were released with no closing credits at all. Films generally had opening credits only, which consisted of just major cast and crew. Two of the first major films to contain extensive closing credits were the blockbusters Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) and West Side Story (1961).

 

Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) had one of the longest and most elaborate closing credit sequences of any film. The credits took around seven minutes to finish. It provided an animated recap of the movie's three-hour storyline, identifying the actors in the order in which they appeared. Superman also had a very long closing credits sequence. It took nearly eight minutes to end, and at the time of the film's release it was the longest end credits sequence ever. Although, some live action/animated films' end credits will later ran from 7 to 8 minutes in length, such as: Space Jam (1996), Scooby-Doo (2002) and The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (2004). The British television series Spooks does not feature any credits, as a result of a decision made by the producers to add to the anonymity of the show's content (about the British Security Services). Instead, the credits appear as a special feature on the series DVDs, and also on the official website.

 

As in motion pictures, most television programs until relatively recently did not list the entire cast and crew.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> > A foley artist creates sound effects.

> >

>

> Named after Jack Foley who worked in several capacities at Universal in the late 1920's & 1930's.

 

 

Thanks. I'd long wondered, but never bothered to look it up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to at least see the cast and characters listed at the end, and lots of old movies did that. I'll admit that I don't care who the caterers or completion bond people are. But, I do like to see a listing of the different film units, telling me the different places where the film was shot, and the songs in the sound track.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually don't mind the end credits. I would rather those who did the work get the credit versus the old days when Cedric Gibbons and Douglas Shearer got credit without actually working on the films.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And of course, it was the ZAZ team who started the business of PARODYING the long end credits by sneaking in little in jokes into the end credits of AIRPLANE! The one that was best where after the usual copyright/rights notice at the very end of the credit roll, they added a simple 'so there!'

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> What I'd like to know is what was the first film to usher in the modern practice of listing every damn credit at the end of a film and why was that started? And WHAT THE HELL IS A GAFFER?

 

I think that started with one of the big epics, such as ?Ben Hur?. The full credits ran while exit music played. That was in the days when cartoons, shorts, and newsreels had been removed from movie programs.

 

A ?gaff? is the spike a telephone lineman used to wear on his feet to climb wooden poles. So a ?gaffer? is a guy who climbs poles, i.e. an electrician or lighting technician in movies.

 

http://www.glenmartin.com/safety/utility/climbaccess.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> I actually don't mind the end credits. I would rather those who did the work get the credit versus the old days when Cedric Gibbons and Douglas Shearer got credit without actually working on the films.

 

 

Even MGM realized that was unfair pretty quick, and ended up giving the person who did the actual work credit as an 'associate'....

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> > What I'd like to know is what was the first film to usher in the modern practice of listing every damn credit at the end of a film and why was that started? And WHAT THE HELL IS A GAFFER?

>

> I think that started with one of the big epics, such as Ben Hur. The full credits ran while exit music played. That was in the days when cartoons, shorts, and newsreels had been removed from movie programs.

>

> A gaff is the spike a telephone lineman used to wear on his feet to climb wooden poles. So a gaffer is a guy who climbs poles, i.e. an electrician or lighting technician in movies.

>

> http://www.glenmartin.com/safety/utility/climbaccess.html

 

I guess that's where they got GAFFE from. When the GAFFER falls off the pole. OUCH, what a gaffe.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if the long end credits were first thought up by some guy who said, ?Hey, this exit music running over the still frame at the end of this film looks bad. Why don?t we run the credits of everyone who worked on the movie, as the exit music plays, and that will also impress the audience by showing them what a large crew we had??

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> I wonder if the long end credits were first thought up by some guy who said, Hey, this exit music running over the still frame at the end of this film looks bad. Why dont we run the credits of everyone who worked on the movie, as the exit music plays, and that will also impress the audience by showing them what a large crew we had?

 

I actually thought it was an excuse to run the complete soundtrack again, drum it into people's heads to get them to run out and buy the LP/Cassette or later the CD.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> What I hate is when some fims tack on another scene after the end credits finish rolling and practically everyone has already left the theatre. This was done in one of the LETHAL WEAPON films.

 

I love it, you hate it... :P

 

It was also done at the end of *Iron Man*. The moral of the story is: watch the credits! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> I wonder if the long end credits were first thought up by some guy who said, Hey, this exit music running over the still frame at the end of this film looks bad.

 

Nothing is worse than the reversed film at the end of GEORGY GIRL looped just to finish the song.

 

I've been catching up on my 70's & 80's films recording them on TCM overnight and watching them the next day. I am aghast at the never ending credits, even though I generally love spotting names of people I know in the industry. But those people are special prop designers, effect designers, costumers, you know those who make a difference in the product.

 

Do we REALLY need to know what concrete box company processed the film? Or the caterer? Or who drove the crew from the hotel to the location? I'm also pretty tired of seeing self indulgent "personals" like births & deaths of anyone working on the film.

 

I loathe the use of already recorded songs in film with the exception of Woody Allen's use of classic jazz tunes, it horribly dates the film and just comes off as a cheap shot.

 

I used to enjoy unwinding after a film by watching the credits and listening to the relaxing end music, but now we're bombarded with stale Journey and Buster Poindexter songs that make me want to scream. It all comes down to money....AGAIN.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...