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Sometimes I miss the production code


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> {quote:title=jbh wrote:}{quote}

> So you question perfectly respectable men settling things with any type of violence in old movies? I would much prefer that to the more recent movies involving women with all kinds of weapons pursuing vendettas (Kill Bill 1 and 2 as an example). I am a great horror movie buff, if the horror movie is great, and I don't mind the gore when it is germane. But violence for violence's sake is just rather nauseating, and as for sex, just watch prime time sitcoms and series. I get sick of seeing heteros, homos, trans, bias, and everything else rolling around everywhere; sex has been introduced into everything, even egg commercials. I realize I'm ranting here, but fade-out leaves one to one's own devices, and the imagination is much more intriguing than watching two people (whatever their proclivities) swap various and sundry body fluids on the screen. Imagine watching these things appear unexpectedly during the family hour, with your 10-year-old grandchild in the room... I could go on forever but I won't. Just had to reply, 'cause this sorta touched a nerve.

 

Honestly, I question anyone settling things with violence. I didn't say a preferred the violence in today's movies; I was just saying that there was as much violence in old films as newer ones but the violence was just a different sort. I don't like the way men (or women) in old movies felt it was ok to smack each other around.

 

And I'm cool with fadeouts; I just feel there are some old movies that should have let them at least get to the fadeout.

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Sometimes I get carried away as much in my dis like of certain movies as my love for others (movies, that is.) But I'm going to consciously try to not apply the word "hate" to a film I don't like, because it's such a strong word, and there are always a lot of people who probably love a film that I "hate." So out of respect for that, I'll try and stick with "really dislike" or "would rather spend two hours watching my cat sleeping ( :) ) than watch this movie". Not that I want to sound wishy-washy, but that word can get people's backs up.

 

I can understand someone, especially an older lady, not enjoying *The Big Lebowski*. Coincidentally enough, I just re-watched it myself the other night. I am not obsessed with the Coen brothers, but I recently discovered a book about them I had, languishing on a shelf, and decided it was time to read it, which semi-awakened my interest in their films. I'm sorry your mum didn't like it, but I can see why- shambling mumbling messy Jeff B., uber-aggressive John Goodman, and a plot that's almost impossible to follow (I really don't think it makes any sense, and I think the title -"The BIG Lebowski" -is a nod to *the Big Sleep*, which also has an incomprehensible plot.)

Actually, this time around, I liked *The Big Lebowski* more than the first time I saw it, and I thought it was quite funny, which I did not on first viewing. But like a lot of the Coens' movies, I think it's an acquired taste.

And there are so many movies to watch that you probably would enjoy, why spend time on one you don't? So many movies, so little time...

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 4, 2011 4:43 PM

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 4, 2011 4:44 PM

Sorry, TikiSoo, I got mixed -up; meant to direct this comment to you, because of your post about the Big Lebowski.

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tracey, I suspect what you were referring to in your post about violence outside of the usual venues in films is the way in old movies, people like Gary Cooper and Cary Grant will haul off and sock some guy who's ticked them off. It comes across as a kind of "defending their honour" thing. Often as not it' s their honour, although quite often it's the honour of their leading lady.

I've noticed that it was considered not only respectable, but almost de rigeour for them to do this. They almost never end up in jail, no one presses assault charges. It often occurs in comedies .

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Did anyone catch *The Broadway Melody*, 1929, with Anita Page and Bessie Love? What a hoot! Second "Best Picture" ( *Wings* was the first). I've seen it before and it makes me appreciate how far talkies came in such a short period of time.

 

I love pre-code films. They are true-to-life. The "bad" guy/girl isn't always punished. My father was born in N.Y.C. in 1924. His birth parents weren't married so he was adopted by my grandparents. He always said "things like that happen in life." Everyone was happy (with the possible exception of his birth mother) and no one was punished. But no one was Catholic either (the biggest culprits in "The Code."

 

During "The Code," as somewhat today, sex out of wedlock was more objectionable than murder. Go figure.

 

BTW, my "illegitimate" father was the one who introduced me to classic movies. My hero!!! We used to watch them together when I was I was a child. He explained eveything to me and named all the characters. An unusual father-and-son activity, yes. But I'll bet I was the only ten-year-old in town who could name people like Ned Sparks, C. Aubry Smith and ZaSu Pitts!

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Tracy, I may not have clearly understood your original post, and I knew I came off really snarky. Apologies offered sincerely. I emphatically agree that people should not be knocking each other around. However, men always seem to get really turned on by girlfights, which has always seemed truly juvenile to me. I used to be horrified watching the girls on the playground in high school, rolling around on the ground, pulling each other's hair, screaming, and showing their granny panties (that dates me again). Violence seems to be the social norm these days, everywhere, so it's rather hard to ignore. As for the sex, I'm no prude. I just don't like watching others, especially teenagers, doing it. And we could really discuss these subjects for days. Again, sincere apologies. I'm really happy it's Friday.

 

Sorry I did not use your screen name properly, as I see MsW did (she is very observant). I think I probably need to put on my specs for future postings.

 

Edited by: jbh on Mar 4, 2011 9:05 PM

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> {quote:title=FilmAficionado wrote:}{quote}

>

> During "The Code," as somewhat today, sex out of wedlock was more objectionable than murder. Go figure.

>

That?s not quite correct.

 

Murder was not a natural tendency among kids, teenagers, or adults.

 

Sex was. In fact, sex was a major overwhelming drive, especially for men between the ages of about 13 to maybe 35.

 

So, we could see some guy murder another guy on the screen, but without us wanting to go out and murder someone.

 

But we couldn?t see someone ?doing it?, without wanting to run right out and ?do it?.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> tracey, I suspect what you were referring to in your post about violence outside of the usual venues in films is the way in old movies, people like Gary Cooper and Cary Grant will haul off and sock some guy who's ticked them off. It comes across as a kind of "defending their honour" thing. Often as not it' s their honour, although quite often it's the honour of their leading lady.

> I've noticed that it was considered not only respectable, but almost de rigeour for them to do this. They almost never end up in jail, no one presses assault charges. It often occurs in comedies .

 

Yeah that's part of it, but I also have a problem w/ film noir--the guys are always duking it out and worse, they seem to always be shaking or smacking the woman. Not cool.

 

And I like film noir.

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> {quote:title=jbh wrote:}{quote}

> Tracy, I may not have clearly understood your original post, and I knew I came off really snarky. Apologies offered sincerely. I emphatically agree that people should not be knocking each other around. However, men always seem to get really turned on by girlfights, which has always seemed truly juvenile to me. I used to be horrified watching the girls on the playground in high school, rolling around on the ground, pulling each other's hair, screaming, and showing their granny panties (that dates me again). Violence seems to be the social norm these days, everywhere, so it's rather hard to ignore. As for the sex, I'm no prude. I just don't like watching others, especially teenagers, doing it. And we could really discuss these subjects for days. Again, sincere apologies. I'm really happy it's Friday.

>

> Sorry I did not use your screen name properly, as I see MsW did (she is very observant). I think I probably need to put on my specs for future postings.

>

> Edited by: jbh on Mar 4, 2011 9:05 PM

 

 

That's ok. Honestly, I have glorified violence in some of my posts--I think the cat fight in Destry Rides Again is very funny, for example...I just don't think that the violence in old films should be overlooked or dismissed. It's real and its there, whether we like it or not.

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> {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> Yeah that's part of it, but I also have a problem w/ film noir--the guys are always duking it out and worse, they seem to always be shaking or smacking the woman. Not cool.

>

> And I like film noir.

 

Hey, if we're talkin' violence in film noir it sends it up to a whole new level. Have you seen *The Big Heat* ? how about that scalding coffee Lee Marvin tosses into lovely Gloria Graham's face? Almost equals some of the nastiness in movies today.

And yeah, people are always getting thoroughly thrashed, trashed, and dumped in a back alley for dead. I will say, though, that the camera often focuses more on the punchers than the punched; often all you see of them is their battered bodies slumped over the garbage cans. That's frequently the "warning" from the bad guys to "stay out" of it (whatever "it" may be.)

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 5, 2011 11:46 AM

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> > Yeah that's part of it, but I also have a problem w/ film noir--the guys are always duking it out and worse, they seem to always be shaking or smacking the woman. Not cool.

> >

> > And I like film noir.

>

> Hey, if we're talkin' violence in film noir it sends it up to a whole new level. Have you seen *The Big Heat* ? how about that scalding coffee Lee Marvin tosses into lovely Gloria Graham's face? Almost equals some of the nastiness in movies today.

> And yeah, people are always getting thoroughly thrashed, trashed, and dumped in a back alley for dead. I will say, though, that the camera often focuses more on the punchers than the punched; often all you see of them is their battered bodies slumped over the garbage cans. That's frequently the "warning" from the bad guys to "stay out" of it (whatever "it" may be.)

>

> Edited by: misswonderly on Mar 5, 2011 11:46 AM

 

 

Exactly. We can't ignore it, just because it's in a classic movie.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> . I hate epics. GWTW should have ended with Scarlet's holding up that handful of Tara's soil and *vowing she'd never be hungry again.*

 

I often like epics, but agree about GWTW. That's one of its funniest lines, and a good place to end.

 

I don't have a problem with violence in film, if it is appropriate to the film, and done from what I consider the proper perspective. I don't like *Pulp Fiction*, because it is amoral, and makes violence stylish and good fun. I don't like *The Godfather*, because it glamorizes and romanticizes violence, and the people who commit it, as well as humanizing them.

 

Films like *Blood Simple* and *Fargo* do have violence, but have a moral point of view, so I can appreciate them. Japanese director Takeshi Kitano's *Fireworks* (Hana-Bi) is as violent as almost anything Tarrantino has made, but it is an intensely moral film, and I enjoy it immensely. And Tarrantino is a fan of it, saying he wishes he had made it. I don't think he gets it, because I don't see that he has ever tried to make a film like it.

 

Generally, inappropriate violence bothers me more than inappropriate sex. I think it's really the opposite of what Fred says was the rationale of the Hays Office. It's easier to be violent, and we have more opportunities to be violent, than most of us do to have sex. Inappropriate violence in films is mean, bordering on evil, and destructive of society. But inappropriate sex is just silly and sophomoric.

 

I think that many films today feel that they have to go well beyond what has been in previous films, just to get noticed. And, that goes well beyond sex and violence. Much is exaggerated to the point of absurdity, but not necessarily meant as comedy. I don't like that element of modern film making. Fortunately, there are still lots of films made that don't make that mistake.

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