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Right now I'm watching *Ryan's Daughter*, 206 minute movie with an intermission and overture.

The question I have is am I denying myself part of the viewing experience if I fast forward through those parts? I didn't in this film but I did while watching Around The World In 80 Days.

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> Well, you can turn up the volume and go to the kitchen to prepare snacks for the second half.

 

That's what I was thinking.

 

In the theaters in the old days, the intermission was the time to run to the snack bar and get some popcorn and a coke. :)

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}

> > Well, you can turn up the volume and go to the kitchen to prepare snacks for the second half.

>

> That's what I was thinking.

>

> In the theaters in the old days, the intermission was the time to run to the snack bar and get some popcorn and a coke. :)

 

Alfred Hitchcock said you should never make a movie longer than the average audience member can hold their bladder...

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> {quote:title=sfpcc1 wrote:}{quote}

> Right now I'm watching *Ryan's Daughter*, 206 minute movie with an intermission and overture.

> The question I have is am I denying myself part of the viewing experience if I fast forward through those parts? I didn't in this film but I did while watching Around The World In 80 Days.

 

Well, my personal feelings about RYAN'S DAUGHTER and its score aside, yes, you are denying yourself the pleasure of some wonderful film scores and orchestrations, if you skip these moments of a film. I lived during the heyday of roadshow releases, and saw virtually every one of them, in their original presentations. I was always in my seat for overtures, entr'acts and exit music. I saw and heard it all. Just like today, I never leave until the end credits are over.

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What really, really **** me off is how David O. Selznick INSISTED on having entrance, intermission, and exit music in all his post GWTW films. There is no need for it in Spellbound , Since You Went Away and Duel in the Sun : they're already long enough.

 

It's pretentious.

 

And I am iffy on the concept of "Exit Music" for a film. You don't need a triumphant processional to grab your coat, shake your leg awake, and say "gee, that was too damn long" to whoever has been sitting next to you.

 

Edited by: JonnyGeetar on Mar 3, 2011 10:06 PM

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Well, the idea behind it, was to indicate that the film was special. Pretty much most things about Hollywood are pretentious. But, the Overtures were to duplicate those in the legitimate theater, when people were given the signal that it was time to put down your drinks and put out your smokes (drinks were not allowed in theaters, until sometime in the 1970s, and cigarettes were usually reserved for a section of the balcony), and take your reserved seat. Having a reserved seat meant that an usher was generally responsible for taking you to your specific seat. That took time, and the Overture gave the theater management to get people in their seats prior to the start of the film. Same for the Ent'racte, following Intermission. Exit Music is certainly not required, but it's kind of nice. Specifically, following a musical.

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I can see it when you went to a show. It gave you time to settle in or take a break.

 

When I burn these kinds of movies to a DVD I always pause the recording 'til they're over. I can't sit there in front of the TV waiting for the movie to start again.

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I ALWAYS sit through any Overture, Intermission, and Exit Music, whether it's on a DVD I'm watching or on TCM. To me that's part of the grand experience. Any time I ever had the chance to see a movie theatrically with those interludes intact, I always enjoyed it. It's showmanship...something sadly lacking in many movies today. These days, with the movie industry as seemingly thought of as more business than art, it seems to be the old "Get 'em on, get 'em off, and get 'em out" train of thought.

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*Johnm explained it clear and sound.* *EXCELLENT!*

 

My guess is that for those of you, who have never experienced what was designated as a "Roadshow" presentation, you must all be whippersnappers! Back in 1955, when Mike Todd produced the mega hit movie version of "Oklahoma," he even insisted that his "Roadshow" presentation in the major cities, shown in the widescreen Todd-AO system, be treated as a special event, similar to that of a Broadway stage show! So, Mike had no soft drinks, candy and popcorn sold in the lobby! What those of us who lived through that wonderful era of the first-run "Roadshow" films will also remember were the beautiful and inspiring programs, sold in the lobby, just like for a Broadway play! Over the many years, I've gathered quite a nice collection of these programs. Some of my all time favorites are "The Ten Commandments," "The Big Country," "The Fall of The Roman Empire," "El Cid," "Spartacus," "Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines." "Circus World," "West Side Story," "55 Days at Peking," "Giant," "Doctor Zhivago," "Raintree County," "Ben-Hur" and when "Gone With The Wind" was reissued in 1968, it too had a program; just as it had one at its first nation wide showing in 1938. Some of these programs were in laminated hard-covers, in full color; while most others were in (heavy duty) magzine style. This was a part of going to the movies that I miss so terribly. Maybe one day, somebody will come up with the idea of recreating this sort of movie presenation as a full-blown film festival.

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I realize that I'm going in a different direction here, but if I start a new thread, with past experience, I'm afraid no one will read it, and I have questions. Being a Grand Hotel virgin (of course, there was no overture, intermission, etc.), I watched this wonderful movie last night. (I paid close attention to Mr. O, and I don't believe he's well.) I also read Wikipedia's info, and they have some incorrect information on their site about Oscar pictures. Anyway, I was immediately drawn in, and watched people with whom I am not familiar. But I was very curious about the stories-up views of the lobby, how it was done in l932, and was just amazed by that. Does anyone know how this was done? Also, are there really white peacocks? And I knew I saw a peak of brown on Ms. Garbo's chest, but I missed that particular spot on Joan's chest, although Wiki mentioned it. And what the H happened to Joan? She was so beautiful, soft, compassionate, fragile, winsome, everything that was lost in her persona (both on-screen and off) as the years progressed. Never have been much of a fan of Garbo, and her tutu attire was slightly pitiful. John Barrymore looked eerily like my grandfather athough my grand's personality was nowhere close to Mr. B's, as he was a gentleman, however fallen. His attempts at redemption were touching and his murder was a shocker. Beery's character is quite off-putting, and I rooted for his downfall (and was rewarded). Lionel did a bang-up job as always. I was glad when the doctor finally explained is facial deformity. I thought it was my cable screwing up, or my own eyesight. Anyhoo, I'd appreciate anyone's comments to an old newcomer to a wonderful old movie.

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> {quote:title=johnm_001 wrote:}{quote}

>Just like today, I never leave until the end credits are over.

 

I always felt the same way, and when I am a movie theatre I will stick around now if there is a chance there is still an add-on (outtakes or an extra scene) possibly coming, but with films that average now end credits running 10 minutes or so I don't usually stay for more than a minute or so.

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Since I first discovered movies almost fifty years ago, I've sat through the credits (and remember "Roadshow" versions of films with great fondness) until the end.

 

Still do and one of the best part of my first date with MrCutter seventeen years ago, he does too!

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*"But I was very curious about the stories-up views of the lobby, how it was done in l932, and was just amazed by that. Does anyone know how this was done?"* - jbh

 

I didn't catch *Grand Hotel* this week so I am not completely sure which lobby shots you're referring to but...

 

is this what you mean?

5498110045_005b8b6fbf.jpg

 

By 1932, all the studios had tall ceilings on the soundstages which could accomodate cameras on cranes -

5498704588_4e865f24f2.jpg

 

or cameras high above in the "rafters" (I don't know what the correct term is?)

 

Glad you liked the movie.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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MovieProfessor, thanks for mentioning "Spartacus", that one is my favorite Overture and Intermission for the powerful score of Alex North. When TCM aired it, I recorded it and made me a CD of the music played during the Overture, Main title, and Intermission. What a unique way to acquire music, LOL!

 

Here is the "Gone With the Wind" Intermission.

 

intermission.jpg

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> {quote:title=jbh wrote:}{quote}

> Also, are there really white peacocks?

 

Yes, they are albino and the males are popular for their tail feathers. The "eye" is still visible, only an ivory shade of white. I love this photo of Claudette Colbert & outrageous costume from SIGN OF THE CROSS:

Colbert,%20Claudette%20(Sign%20of%20the%

 

Can anyone tell me how to "resize" photos?

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I hope Claudette Colbert doesn't make too much *noise* while wearing that getup. :D

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-460064/Zoo-slaughters-peacocks-neighbours-noise-complaints.html

 

If you remember, this website had a system crash a couple of years ago and due to how the General Discussions was fixed, there is no way to resize the photos. I think it still can be done the old way in the other forums.

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> MovieProfessor, thanks for mentioning "Spartacus", that one is my favorite Overture and Intermission for the powerful score of Alex North. When TCM aired it, I recorded it and made me a CD of the music played during the Overture, Main title, and Intermission. What a unique way to acquire music, LOL!

 

All that music is on the deluxe 2 CD soundtrack release.

 

http://soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=2695

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In the theater, I always sit through the entrance and exit music. If the film was good, the exit music extends the afterglow nicely. I do often take an intermission, for food and or bladder, during that music. When I record such films to DVD, I put chapter stops at the beginning and ending of the musical interludes. Even though my DVD recorder will record on double layer discs, I sometimes break long films at the end of the intermission music, and put the rest on a second disc.

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The situation of an epic film musical pertains to what you?d get in a ?live? staged presentation. The whole idea of an overture as well as the entr'acte and exit music is to establish the mood-set and atmosphere of the story. Also, because it?s a musical, part of the idea is ?selling? the tunes as a remembrance to the entertaining experience. Later on, once Hollywood and movies established the music interlude as part of the presentation, this also gave a film an extra added incentive. It all boils down to a tradition of grandeur to what there once was to going out to a theater, be it the ?live? stage or a motion picture. Naturally, over the years, audiences began to feel that it wasn?t so necessary, this need of showmanship, probably due to emerging new technologies, quick and easy accessible items such as the phonograph, radio, television, digital gaming and finally the computer. Today, movies are just packaged like everything else and lack a sense of grandeur or that you?re entering a special sort of different world; a magical one that once could whirl you away from the outside world. This sort of presentation doesn?t happen anymore. But then, you might feel this digital technology has made things a whole lot easier to exploit what once took lots of time and effort on the part of filmmakers to create their spectacle. It?s just that what?s missing is when you arrive at the theater and you?re not brought to any sort of special place or feel you?re about to get what could be considered your money?s worth in terms of that added extra towards the presentation.

 

In the old days, (my time of thinking) we looked forward to experiencing the dynamic scope and thrill of a big epic film, be it a historical drama or what was once a big Broadway or London staged musical. It was all about the presentation and not so much getting to the theater and getting fixed towards an impatient sort of mood to feel ?When in the hell is the movie going to start?? Well, there was a lot more to the movies when I was just another, typical fan and felt an excitement and thrill to having arrived at what was so different then staying at home and being clued to the radio, phonograph or television. Yet, there might still be a glimmer of hope on the distant movie horizon . . . One aspect that is very much a throwback to my day is this current flux of IMAX presentations. At least, here we have something that?s similar, in the sense that it does surpass what anyone?s wide screen television, surround-sound system at home can produce.

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