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Groovy Flix on TCM-Week of Mar 21st!


markbeckuaf
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The grooves begin for me on Monday, Mar 21 with a daytime screening of THEY GAVE HIM A GUN (1937), featuring Spence and Franchot Tone--a film I've only seen once and I remember it as pretty darn powerful! Later that evening, I'm looking forward to the rarely aired CAUGHT (1949) with Robert Ryan!

 

Tuesday night we again are treated to an evening of the Blonde Bombshell herself, Jean Harlow, in a range of films she starred in with the King of Hollywood himself, Mr. Clark Gable! My faves of the evening will be THE SECRET SIX (1931), a very bizarre pre-code that I really enjoy! RED DUST (1932) and HOLD YOUR MAN (1933) are both great flix, and long-time faves of mine as well! The evening is rounded out by WIFE VS. SECRETARY and Harlow's final film (sadly!), SARATOGA (1937).

 

Wednesday daytime treats us to some cool noir and crime flix including EXPERIMENT IN TERROR (1962), GUN CRAZY (1949), THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (1949), and the rarely screened SHOCK CORRIDOR (1963)!

 

Wednesday evening will be a delight with LITTLE MISS MARKER (1934), a Shirley Temple flick in prime time! Along with one of my all-time favorite Eddie G. Robinson gangster spoofs, A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER (1938)!!!

 

We're mostly ensconced in the 30's on Thursday during the day and that's just fine with me! Kicking it off with the great pre-code 20,000 YEARS IN SING SING (1932), with Spence and Bette Davis herself! Then we just hang it in the 30's with a lineup that features THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE (1934), BROADWAY GONDOLIER (1935), with Joan Blondell (hotcha-cha-cha-cha!!), THE PERFECT GENTLEMAN (1935), THERE GOES THE GROOM (1937), and HONLULU (1939) with George and Gracie! :) Before prime-time hits, one of my all time favorite Gable/Crawford pairings screens: STRANGE CARGO (1940)--love that flick!!

 

Saturday morning we kick it off in a groove with the wild and wacky Marx Bros in ANIMAL CRACKERS (1930), one of my faves of their Paramount years! This is followed up by a comedy team of a different nature, but one I've been grooving to over the past year, the Bowery Boys weekly feature, this time it's SPOOK CHASERS (1957). Btw, I've been curious to see how other folks feel about the post-Leo Gorcey flix? I find them still entertaining, for the most part, but his presence does seem to be missed.

 

Saturday night is Miss Joan Crawford herself, and one of the flix is THE DAMNED DON'T CRY, a flick I'm definitely looking forward to!

 

I know some folks were wondering about STELLA DALLAS (1937) and it's on Sunday, Mar 27 @ 10am, so set your alarms, watches, DVR's, VCR's!

 

And Silent Sunday Night features NOAH'S ARK from 1929 with Noah Beery, Dolores Costello and George O'Brien!

 

Dig it!

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Mark, thanks for the reminders. Much good stuff ahead. CAUGHT is one I'm especially eager to see.

 

Don't know if you're following filmlover's "1939 day by day as it happens" thread in Your Favorites--it's great--but the ad for HONOLULU said, "Go wicky wacky woo with wild Hawaiian cuties!"

 

So I hope you'll go wicky wacky woo this week!

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> {quote:title=markbeckuaf wrote:}{quote}

> The grooves begin for me on Monday, Mar 21 with a daytime screening of THEY GAVE HIM A GUN (1937), featuring Spence and Franchot Tone--a film I've only seen once and I remember it as pretty darn powerful! Later that evening, I'm looking forward to the rarely aired CAUGHT (1949) with Robert Ryan!

>

> Tuesday night we again are treated to an evening of the Blonde Bombshell herself, Jean Harlow, in a range of films she starred in with the King of Hollywood himself, Mr. Clark Gable! My faves of the evening will be THE SECRET SIX (1931), a very bizarre pre-code that I really enjoy! RED DUST (1932) and HOLD YOUR MAN (1933) are both great flix, and long-time faves of mine as well! The evening is rounded out by WIFE VS. SECRETARY and Harlow's final film (sadly!), SARATOGA (1937).

>

 

It would be nice if TCM could show both the "black" and "white" footage of "Hold Your Man." A preacher figures prominently in the film; in the version most of the country saw, the character is black. However, since MGM believed most white southerners wouldn't accept a black man in a position of authority (he marries white characters), the version issued for southern markets made the preacher white -- and portrayed by none other than the great character actor Henry B. Walthall (whose most famous film, ironically, is "The Birth Of A Nation").

 

TCM has shown alternate footage beforehand; in 2006, it ran the ending of "Vigil In The Night" that aired in international markets in which the characters reacted to Germany's invasion of Poland. So I don't see any reason why it couldn't do likewise for "Hold Your Man" if the "white" footage exists.

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> {quote:title=VP19 wrote:}{quote}

>

> It would be nice if TCM could show both the "black" and "white" footage of "Hold Your Man." A preacher figures prominently in the film; in the version most of the country saw, the character is black. However, since MGM believed most white southerners wouldn't accept a black man in a position of authority (he marries white characters), the version issued for southern markets made the preacher white --

 

I don't think that's correct. There might be two versions of the film, but the South wouldn't have a problem with the preacher being black. It would be New Yorkers and other Northerners who would have had that problem.

 

Show me some black people in the street scenes of any Doris Day or Judy Holliday movie that is set in New York, or in "Marty", or in "State Fair" set in Iowa. There aren't any. But black people are in just about every movie set in the South, and Southerners didn't care.

 

Hattie McDaniel was certainly "in authority" in many of the scenes in "Gone With the Wind" and I remember the white audience in Mobile, Alabama, when I first saw the film in 1953, thought she was great, and she seemed to be the most honest and intelligent person in the cast.

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> {quote:title=markbeckuaf wrote:}{quote}

> The grooves begin for me on Monday, Mar 21 with a daytime screening of THEY GAVE HIM A GUN (1937), featuring Spence and Franchot Tone--a film I've only seen once and I remember it as pretty darn powerful! Later that evening, I'm looking forward to the rarely aired CAUGHT (1949) with Robert Ryan!

>

> Tuesday night we again are treated to an evening of the Blonde Bombshell herself, Jean Harlow, in a range of films she starred in with the King of Hollywood himself, Mr. Clark Gable! My faves of the evening will be THE SECRET SIX (1931), a very bizarre pre-code that I really enjoy! RED DUST (1932) and HOLD YOUR MAN (1933) are both great flix, and long-time faves of mine as well! The evening is rounded out by WIFE VS. SECRETARY and Harlow's final film (sadly!), SARATOGA (1937).

>

> Wednesday daytime treats us to some cool noir and crime flix including EXPERIMENT IN TERROR (1962), GUN CRAZY (1949), THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (1949), and the rarely screened SHOCK CORRIDOR (1963)!

>

> Wednesday evening will be a delight with LITTLE MISS MARKER (1934), a Shirley Temple flick in prime time! Along with one of my all-time favorite Eddie G. Robinson gangster spoofs, A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER (1938)!!!

>

> We're mostly ensconced in the 30's on Thursday during the day and that's just fine with me! Kicking it off with the great pre-code 20,000 YEARS IN SING SING (1932), with Spence and Bette Davis herself! Then we just hang it in the 30's with a lineup that features THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE (1934), BROADWAY GONDOLIER (1935), with Joan Blondell (hotcha-cha-cha-cha!!), THE PERFECT GENTLEMAN (1935), THERE GOES THE GROOM (1937), and HONLULU (1939) with George and Gracie! :) Before prime-time hits, one of my all time favorite Gable/Crawford pairings screens: STRANGE CARGO (1940)--love that flick!!

>

> Saturday morning we kick it off in a groove with the wild and wacky Marx Bros in ANIMAL CRACKERS (1930), one of my faves of their Paramount years! This is followed up by a comedy team of a different nature, but one I've been grooving to over the past year, the Bowery Boys weekly feature, this time it's SPOOK CHASERS (1957). Btw, I've been curious to see how other folks feel about the post-Leo Gorcey flix? I find them still entertaining, for the most part, but his presence does seem to be missed.

>

> Saturday night is Miss Joan Crawford herself, and one of the flix is THE DAMNED DON'T CRY, a flick I'm definitely looking forward to!

>

> I know some folks were wondering about STELLA DALLAS (1937) and it's on Sunday, Mar 27 @ 10am, so set your alarms, watches, DVR's, VCR's!

>

> And Silent Sunday Night features NOAH'S ARK from 1929 with Noah Beery, Dolores Costello and George O'Brien!

>

> Dig it!

 

Wow! This is great! Another great month. I'm still dubbing films from late-night last week, and this morning's films have been great too. Did you see that film that was just on, with Warren William and Joan Blondell? Yikes, what a dress!

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Fred, I know, it's out of control!!!

 

I haven't yet watched SMARTY, I have SOOOOO many flix on my DVR it's crazy! Fortunately I have a lotta room! Planning to do some catch-up this weekend! But man any flick with my main man Warren William and the sexy dame, Joan Blondell, I'm there!

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Kingrat, thank you! I also am looking forward to CAUGHT!

 

OMG that is so hilarious about HONOLULU!! I haven't been able to follow filmlover's thread since the board changes. It seems longer threads like his and Kyle's over there, I try to go to the most recent page, and it just comes up with a blank page. I've tried several days now, will keep on trying, I know they're working on those things.

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Lily did the bird sounds just as they were described in the 1904 book:

 

"Green Mansions", Chapter II:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/942/942-h/942-h.htm#2HCH0001

 

"After that tempest of motion and confused noises the silence of the forest seemed very profound; but before I had been resting many moments it was broken by a low strain of exquisite bird-melody, wonderfully pure and expressive, unlike any musical sound I had ever heard before.

 

It seemed to issue from a thick cluster of broad leaves of a creeper only a few yards from where I sat. With my eyes fixed on this green hiding-place I waited with suspended breath for its repetition, wondering whether any civilized being had ever listened to such a strain before. Surely not, I thought, else the fame of so divine a melody would long ago have been noised abroad.

 

I thought of the rialejo, the celebrated organbird or flute-bird, and of the various ways in which hearers are affected by it. To some its warbling is like the sound of a beautiful mysterious instrument, while to others it seems like the singing of a blithe-hearted child with a highly melodious voice.

 

I had often heard and listened with delight to the singing of the rialejo in the Guayana forests, but this song, or musical phrase, was utterly unlike it in character. It was pure, more expressive, softer - so low that at a distance of forty yards I could hardly have heard it. But its greatest charm was its resemblance to the human voice - a voice purified and brightened to something almost angelic.

 

Imagine, then, my impatience as I sat there straining my sense, my deep disappointment when it was not repeated! I rose at length very reluctantly and slowly began making my way back; but when I had progressed about thirty yards, again the sweet voice sounded just behind me, and turning quickly, I stood still and waited. The same voice, but not the same song - not the same phrase; the notes were different, more varied and rapidly enunciated, as if the singer had been more excited.

 

The blood rushed to my heart as I listened; my nerves tingled with a strange new delight, the rapture produced by such music heightened by a sense of mystery. Before many moments I heard it again, not rapid now, but a soft warbling, lower than at first, infinitely sweet and tender, sinking to lisping sounds that soon ceased to be audible; the whole having lasted as long as it would take me to repeat a sentence of a dozen words. This seemed the singer's farewell to me, for I waited and listened in vain to hear it repeated; and after getting back to the starting-point I sat for upwards of an hour, still hoping to hear it once more!"

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=VP19 wrote:}{quote}

> >

> > It would be nice if TCM could show both the "black" and "white" footage of "Hold Your Man." A preacher figures prominently in the film; in the version most of the country saw, the character is black. However, since MGM believed most white southerners wouldn't accept a black man in a position of authority (he marries white characters), the version issued for southern markets made the preacher white --

>

> I don't think that's correct. There might be two versions of the film, but the South wouldn't have a problem with the preacher being black. It would be New Yorkers and other Northerners who would have had that problem.

>

> Show me some black people in the street scenes of any Doris Day or Judy Holliday movie that is set in New York, or in "Marty", or in "State Fair" set in Iowa. There aren't any. But black people are in just about every movie set in the South, and Southerners didn't care.

>

> Hattie McDaniel was certainly "in authority" in many of the scenes in "Gone With the Wind" and I remember the white audience in Mobile, Alabama, when I first saw the film in 1953, thought she was great, and she seemed to be the most honest and intelligent person in the cast.

 

Check David Stenn's Harlow bio, "Bombshell"; it has stills from both versions.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=VP19 wrote:}{quote}

> > Check David Stenn's Harlow bio, "Bombshell"; it has stills from both versions.

>

> I believe you, but it wasn't done for the South. It was done for the Midwest and the Northeast.

 

The caption says the "white" version was distributed in the south. In fact, Stenn refers to it as the "southern version."

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> {quote:title=VP19 wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > > {quote:title=VP19 wrote:}{quote}

> > > Check David Stenn's Harlow bio, "Bombshell"; it has stills from both versions.

> >

> > I believe you, but it wasn't done for the South. It was done for the Midwest and the Northeast.

>

> The caption says the "white" version was distributed in the south. In fact, Stenn refers to it as the "southern version."

 

That's a modern Hollywood myth to cover up their years of racism in films made about the North.

 

Just look at the movies. You'll see lots of black people in films made about the South, but they are often absent from films made about the North.

 

Were there no black people in New York in 1954, none on the streets, none in the military, none shopping in department stores?

Judy Holliday film trailer:

 

 

Were there no black people in the Bronx in 1955?

Trailer for "Marty":

 

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*"I haven't been able to follow filmlover's thread since the board changes. It seems longer threads like his and Kyle's over there, I try to go to the most recent page, and it just comes up with a blank page. I've tried several days now, will keep on trying, I know they're working on those things."* - markbeckuaf

 

Mark,

You can't "see" the most _recent_ page?

 

Have you set the pages to display in Ascending or Descending order?

Ascending = Original (Very first) post of thread on Page 1.

Descending = Most Recent (today's image) post to thread on Page 1.

 

If one click's solely on the title of the thread,

http://forums.tcm.com/thread.jspa?threadID=116507&tstart=0

 

what did you see before the upgrade (today's added image?) and what do you see today (absolutely nothing)?

 

Let me know so we can work out a solution.

 

It all seems rather odd.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Mar 19, 2011 8:05 AM

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Kyle, my man, thank you for the settings change suggestion! I don't usually prefer to read threads that way, cos they're backwards! LOL, but I tried it and it worked for the longer threads like yours over there in the "Your Favorites" forum, which is now up to 307 pages. I used to be able to just click on the last page (whatever number that is) from the forum thread title, and it would work, but now it just goes to a blank screen (not totally blank, you still know you're on the TCM site, but there is no thread and no messages). I'll just re-set my settings when I visit that forum until it's fixed!

 

And I was treated to a great poster of SMARTY, which was so groovy because I just watched that fun flick this morning for the first time! WW was in fine form, as was the entire cast! What a great last gasp of the pre-code era (May of 1934)!!

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