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Edward Everett Horton


clearskies

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Such fun yesterday with EEH. I love watching his face, he didn't have to say anything for us to know what he was thinking. I also like his crazy remarks when asked a question, even when he said "why?" when asked to say hello to someone. Can't get enough of this guy. Anyone else like him?

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It's so wonderful when TCM pays a nice little tribute to the likes of a grand and wonderful character actor like Edward. These are the times that TCM really has its value, because where else could younger generations finding an interest in classic Hollywood, go to see what there once was of these lovable and inspiring talents?

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I'm with you, Clearskies. Please see my post on EEH on the "Fred and Ginger Love" thread. I've been a fan of his voice since I was five or six and heard him on "Fractured Fairy Tales." It was sheer delight for me to discover him in movies -- first in "Arsenic and Old Lace," then in the Fred & Ginger movies that have him, then with Charlie Ruggles as his rival in others from the 30s. And to think I missed him yesterday!

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He was such fun, wasn't he? I was laughing & clapping like a kid practically every time he opened his mouth. Some things never get old. Must'v missed your post on the Fred & Ginger thread & have never heard him on "Fractured Fairy Tales." When was that done?

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"Fractured Fairy Tales" was a supporting feature on the various iterations of Rocky & Bullwinkle. Horton was not the only famous voice actor on this long-running (and still very funny) cartoon series. Charlie Ruggles did the title role in another supporting feature called "Aesop and Son." Unlike Horton, his name was not listed on the credits. Hans Conried voiced Snidely Whiplash on the "Dudley Do-Right" segments. Mr. Peabody, the superintelligent dog with the time-transporting Wayback Machine and a pet boy, Sherman, was modelled on but not voiced by Clifton Webb. William Conrad (possibly more famous as the radio voice of Matt Dillon than for his on-screen parts at that time) narrated the actual Rocky and Bullwinkle segments.

 

If you've never seen them, check your local library (maybe the kid's section) for a DVD or VHS. There are still plenty of laughs in them, 50 years later.

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Love EEH! He's one of my favorite character actors. No one could do flustered like him. I like him unflustered too--his performance in Holiday as the wise-acre professor, bantering with Cary Grant, Hepburn and Jeanne Dixon is wonderful--funny and sharp.

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I have 2 movies that stars Edward Everett Horton. "Little Big Shot" (1935) in which he was Robert Armstrong's sidekick who was running a fake watch scam.

"Helen's Babies" (1924) who was a confirmed bachelor who wrote a book claiming to know how to raise children. Did he ever got a reality check, Lol!

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If you watch "Fractured Fairy Tales" or anything else related to the adventures of Bullwinkle J. Moose and his flying rodent friend, be prepared to FALL DOWN LAUGHING! It's some of the funniest, most sophisticated humor I've ever seen on TV. Well, maybe sophisticated is the wrong word. Funny? Definitely the right word!

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Related to Horton in Holiday, he also played one of the only sane characters in Arsenic and Old Lace.

 

I love the guy but I can see where a little could go a long way but in most movies he is used to great effect.

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He is so funny in several of the Fred and Ginger films! Love his double and triple takes....fun seeing him much later in his career in Pocketful of Miracles. Actually, quite surprised to see how much work he did up to 1970...I guess much of it was TV and they don't run shows like It Takes a Thief, or Nanny and the Professor, sadly enough....

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Horton didn't appear to age.

 

I also love him in those Fred and Ginger movies but I assumed he was 50 years old then. But I see him in movies 20 years latter and he still looks about the same. I don't know when he was born but I assume he was younger than he looked in those 30s movies and thus he held up well in those movies he did in the 60s.

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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}

> Horton didn't appear to age.

>

> I also love him in those Fred and Ginger movies but I assumed he was 50 years old then. But I see him in movies 20 years latter and he still looks about the same. I don't know when he was born but I assume he was younger than he looked in those 30s movies and thus he held up well in those movies he did in the 60s.

 

He was born in 1886 and died in 1970. I didn't think he aged much either. Besides the Fred and Ginger movies, two of my favorite movies with EEH are SPRINGTIME IN THE ROCKIES and TROUBLE IN PARADISE.

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Unfortunatley I did not realize the entire day was Edward Everett Horton movies. But as soon as I saw him I had to check out the movies. I had not seen several of the movies before. I wish I had DVRed them.

 

I am a fan of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers movies and first saw him as an actor in those movies. I had been a fan of Edward Everett Horton's voice since Fractured Fairy Tales. Watching the complete seasons of Rocky and Bullwinkle you enjoy the quick wit of the writing all over again. Too bad the Dudley Doo Right Emporium closed. I even got the book of Factured Fairy Tales. I am so glad so many other people enjoy watching him, too.

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