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Which films would you loved to see with a Audience when it first came out


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THE MIRACLE MAN (1919), HOLLYWOOD (1923),GREED (1924), LONDON AFTER MIDNIGHT (1927), GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES (1927), LADIES OF THE MOB (1928), THE CASE OF LENE SMITH (1929), 4 DEVILS (1929), THE ROGUE SONG (1930).

Since all these titles are either lost or only exist in fragments, I would love to have been able to see them in their entirety.

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My mom, who would have been about 9 or 10 when she first saw The Wizard of Oz in 1939/40, once told me that she could never forget the sound of the "gasp" that came from the audience when the film changed from b/w to color.

 

I'll bet for many children, that was the first time they had ever seen a color movie that wasn't a cartoon.

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The films which I would have loved to see when they initially debut. On Thursday October 6, 1927 "The Jazz Singer" debut as the "first talkie". I would have loved to been there to see and feel the reaction of the movie audience after Al Jolson finished his singing and then said "Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain't heard nothing yet". I would have loved to been part of the movie audience on Saturday June 28, 1928 when "Lights of New York" debut as the first full-feature film with synchronous dialogue. I bet that would have been a novelty with the movie audience.

 

I also would have loved to been part of the movie audience on Saturday March 7, 1931 when Charlie Chaplin decided to go against the trend of "talking pictures" and released a "semi" silent film "City Lights". The word "semi" meaning the only sound of talking is gibberish. I would have loved to been part of the movie audience to experience for the first time seeing the blind girl character discovering that the "Tramp" was her benefactor. The last shot of Charlie Chaplin with the flower in his teeth, the violins playing in the background as the picture fades to black. I wish I knew someone who saw this film when it debuted. To hear this person speak of the audience reaction as they left the theatre and what the audience shared with their friends and family about "City Lights" would be priceless.

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> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}

> The films which I would have loved to see when they initially debut. On Thursday October 6, 1927 "The Jazz Singer" debut as the "first talkie". I would have loved to been there to see and feel the reaction of the movie audience after Al Jolson finished his singing and then said "Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain't heard nothing yet". I would have loved to been part of the movie audience on Saturday June 28, 1928 when "Lights of New York" debut as the first full-feature film with synchronous dialogue. I bet that would have been a novelty with the movie audience.

>

> I also would have loved to been part of the movie audience on Saturday March 7, 1931 when Charlie Chaplin decided to go against the trend of "talking pictures" and released a "semi" silent film "City Lights". The word "semi" meaning the only sound of talking is gibberish. I would have loved to been part of the movie audience to experience for the first time seeing the blind girl character discovering that the "Tramp" was her benefactor. The last shot of Charlie Chaplin with the flower in his teeth, the violins playing in the background as the picture fades to black. I wish I knew someone who saw this film when it debuted. To hear this person speak of the audience reaction as they left the theatre and what the audience shared with their friends and family about "City Lights" would be priceless.

 

Talking pictures weren't an entirely new item in 1927; Thomas Edison was exhibiting such films as early as 1913, and in the early '20s several such movies made the rounds as experimental items. However, none of them had the technological knowhow to be sustained successes, unlike Vitaphone and Fox's "sound on film," which eventually became the industry standard.

 

I liked the earlier comment about seeing films now considered lost, and to that group I would like to add the notorious "Convention City" (1933) and the several movies Carole Lombard made for Fox in 1925 before an automobile accident left a scar on her face that caused the studio to drop her. The accident apparently made her learn a great deal about cinematography, lighting and such. Perhaps the pre-accident Lombard, relying on her youthful beauty, wouldn't have learned such things and might not have ultimately become successful in the 1930s. If even one of those early films were found, it could answer many questions about Carole's development as an actress.

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The night Birth of a Nation was shown for the first time. I understand there were strong emotions for both sides demonstrated. People were yelling at the screen and at each other. Police were called to quell the disturbances and some fist fights. It must have been very exciting to have been there.

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I'd like to have seen the 90-minute version of *FREAKS,* which allegedly caused patrons to faint and flee the theater in terror. (I did manage to see *ISHTAR* in its initial release, and can recall a similar audience response.)

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Had I concentrated on it a bit more I supposedly could have seen Death on the Nile on film. (I read the book about six months after the movie came out). Let's see The Wizard of Oz, 2001, Fantasia, Barry Lyndon, Vertigo The Sorrow and the Pity, Shoah, Brazil, are all obvious choices.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Of classic films, *King Kong* and *Captain Blood*. But, what I'd really like to have seen were some of the William Castle films where he did various tricks on the audience, or a John Waters film with smell-o-vision scratch-and-sniff cards.

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