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FredCDobbs

RARELY SEEN GEMS 4.5 hours Sunday Night 4/3

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*Fragments* was a wonderful production - the archivists who introduced the clips were splendid and though it was heartbreaking watching these bits and pieces, getting interested in the plots and all, knowing you can never see them, I am so glad that we have even this small bit of footage.

 

I particularly enjoyed the end of the movie *The Way of All Flesh* with Emil Jannings, he was superb... I can only hope the rest of the film will turn up someday.

 

And the Colleen Moore and Clara Bow scenes were charming, risque.... *Flaming Youth* looks great! Clara was so animated in *3 Weekends*!

 

I completely enjoyed the Fairbanks and Conley clips, both were excellent.

 

My favorite piece of footage was from the *Gold Diggers of Broadway*. They really knew how to put over dance numbers then...on the diagonal, with rising platforms, balconies, lights... tulip girls. It was quaint and a little poignant to me seeing Nick Lucas singing *Tiptoe Through the Tulips*....he probably thought this was his big break back in 1929, and to see him after all these years, well, it made me happy.

 

 

 

God bless TCM and film archivists everywhere.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 4, 2011 10:45 AM

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I really enjoyed the Fragments program. It was wonderful, yet frustrating.

 

The Colleen Moore clip from FLAMING YOUTH was very interesting and frustrating because a complete copy of this film was donated by Ms. Moore and left to rot by the archive it was donated to.

 

I loved the Clara Bow fragments, again I would have loved to have seen what the complete films were like, they looked like they would have been fun.

 

The Douglas Fairbanks clip was delightful, as was the GOLD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY clips.

 

I had seen the John Ford clip of THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH many years ago on AMC when John Ford was the subject of their Preservation Festival. AMC also showed the surviving reels of MOTHER MACHREE (1928). I miss the old AMC

 

The trailers were really neat. BEAU SABREUR looked like it must have been excellent, the same with STRONG BOY and ROUGH HOUSE ROSIE.

 

The surviving fragment of THE WAY OF ALL FLESH were very touching. Jannings performance looks like it would have been as powerful as that of THE LAST COMMAND.

 

Thank you TCM for showing these bittersweet bits.

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I was in Nitrate Heaven last night. Which is also Nitrate Hell, as disappearance is a fate worse than death, and we'll never know how much we missed. So let me echo all those who have said, thank God for the archivists and restorers.

 

I also missed a good bit of it last night because I had to drive into town to pick up someone from the bus station, so I'm praying my VCR worked. Got back in time to see what may have been the most lavish and extended Busby Berkeley dance sequence ever -- did anyone make that comparison? And that wonderful Edward Everett Horton rarebit dream sequence -- such a clear print, as someone already commented, and such innovative technique!

 

I hope all the people on these boards who have questioned why TCM bothers to show silent films at all tuned in last night and had their minds opened.

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That *Busby Berkeley* number hurt my eyes! It was incredible.

 

I liked the *New York City* film by ....well, I can't remember which one it was, but the director/cameraman was a genius.

 

Until the @#$% schedule shows up in a form that actually has a description, or reviews that you can actually read, I am stuck for the guy's name. everything he filmed was beautiful, even if it was just a guy picking through garbage. Some of the other cityscapes were not near as interesting. I'll have to check my recording to find out who he was.

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Wendy,

 

Here is a very good quote from a guy on another forum that I barely know. It's brief, but it makes a statement.

 

 

 

*"Having never seen the Clara Bow and Colleen Moore fragments before, I was entranced. Makes me so sad that the films from these great ladies that DO exist can't seem to find their way to DVD."*

 

*Also, The Way of All Flesh...what a heartbreaking scene...and loss for us."*

 

*colbyco82*

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Well, I can certainly agree - I would love it if more of the preserved films made their way to dvd so we can all enjoy them as they were meant to be enjoyed, by an audience.

 

It would be wonderful if TCM could air some of the existing films by Colleen Moore, Clara Bow, Emil Jannings, and other silent film stars - or maybe the recent finds like *Upstream*.

 

*In fact what would be GREAT is for TCM to air a silent and pre-code preservation month.* - showing restored films from the earliest movie eras all month long,

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Wendy,

 

Here is another interesting quote:

 

 

*"FLAMING YOUTH to me was the fragment I felt the most keen sense of loss over; it looks like such a wonderful time capsule of the time. The party scene that featured those Hawaiian musicians I can only imagine how they actually sounded (if there had been sound!). The Clara Bow scenes are another bittersweet glimpse. If only all silent films as these were as safe and sparkling as CHICAGO (1927)."*

 

*I'll start looking around tomorrow.*

 

*westegg*

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Wendy,

 

By the way, I ended up watching all of *LAILA.* Even though I hadn't planned to. I pre-ordered the DVD release a couple weeks ago.

 

The 2nd half was excellent, but I thought the first half of the film dragged on for to long. Mona Martison was a really pretty and talented actress. The leading man looked a good deal like Lars Hanson.The remainder of the picture had some very moving scenes, and spectacular cinematography.

 

I could have done without the Stark Naked children rollicking around in the Snow. But it was an interesting, and well made film overall.

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> It would be wonderful if TCM could air some of the existing films by Colleen Moore, Clara Bow, Emil Jannings, and other silent film stars - or maybe the recent finds like *Upstream*.

>

> *In fact what would be GREAT is for TCM to air a silent and pre-code preservation month.* - showing restored films from the earliest movie eras all month long,

 

Jannings is in an early sound film "The Blue Angel" ("Der blaue Engel"), that was shot twice, once with German dialogue, and next with English dialogue.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0020697/

 

TCM used to show these, but I haven't seen them on the air in years.

 

I like the German version better, because the voices sound more authentic, like being in Berlin around 1929. This is what the nightclub scenes in "Cabaret" were based on.

 

The film is easy to follow in German, especially if you've seen the English version. Basically all that happens is that some high school boys have some photos of a nightclub dancer, and Jannings sees them and doesn't approve. However, he goes to the nightclub to check out the dancer, and he winds up falling in love with her and marrying her. Then he becomes her slave.

 

This film is a rare treat because it looks like a silent film, yet it has a sound track with dialogue and music.

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Scott it was Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) that lost the copy of *Flaming Youth* that Colleen Moore gave them. I don't know if she gave them other films, but if she did I guess thay lost them too.

 

*Flaming Youth* did indeed make a superstar of Moore but also co-starred Milton Sills, Ben Lyon, Elliott Dexter, and Myrtle Steadman.

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I still have hopes that some of the films from last night will be found. *Flaming Youth* or *The Way of All Flesh* would be a spectacular find, as would any Theda Bara film.

 

I ended up missing *Laila*, to record the *Unseen Cinema* . I am glad I got it.

 

>I liked the New York City film by ....well, I can't remember which one it was, but the director/cameraman was a genius.

 

The name of the man who made the *Manhattan Medley* cityscape for Fox Movietone News was named *Bonney Powell.* He was brilliant - the clip right before of the architecture of the city was positively stultifying next to his hustling, bustling NYC.

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Blue Angel (the German version) aired on TCM within the last year. I don't remember the exact date (most likely during Sunday imports) but I know this for fact because that is how I watched the movie recently.

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Fred - I've seen both versions of *the Blue Angel*, and I like the German better too.

 

Scottman - Milton Sills really had a great screen presence- I was surprised.

 

Did anyone else notice Tully Marshall as the evil dad in *The Village Blacksmith?* Also one scene with Francis Ford...

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"I liked the New York City film by ....well, I can't remember which one it was, but the director/cameraman was a genius."

 

Can someone tell me how to properly excerpt and frame quotes from other posters that I want to respond to?

 

I haven't seen that part yet, until I review the tape, but wanted to refer you to a German silent, "Berlin: Symphony of a Great City." It was made in 1927. According to Wikipedia, the 1921 U.S. film "Manhatta," by Charles Sheeler and Paul Strand, was a similar, earlier treatment of another great city, New York. I now recall reading that "Manhatta" was based on Whitman's poem (although I thought that was "Manahatta"). Maybe that's the one from last night. If so, the wiki post said it's available on the "Unseen Cinema" DVD, first released in 2005, although the film was not fully restored until 2009.

 

The wiki post lists a couple of other cityscapes of this sort: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin:_Symphony_of_a_City. I find them fascinating. On the "Classic Arts Showcase" channel I have seen footage from an even older film, from 1905, showing views of St. Petersburg (in that revolutionary year, but the revolution was elsewhere).

 

In fact, the "Classic Arts Showcase," for those who are lucky enough to receive it, has a lot of wonderful "unseen cinema" clips. Many are innovative, but the most truly unique one I've seen was a WInsor MacKay "pinboard animation" of "Night on Bald Mountain." Only caught it once, around Halloween 2009, and have never been able to find it again.

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There were two parts about NY and I don't remember which one it was but the one I especially liked was when they were showing the different people of the city from many different backgrounds. I thought that scene was pretty neat.

 

And on another note if someone could give me that poem that was on the 3 screen part I would really appreciate it. :)

 

I wish I had recorded these to keep. Well maybe TCM will do a repeat in the near future.

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> {quote:title=Kinokima wrote:}{quote}

> Blue Angel (the German version) aired on TCM within the last year. I don't remember the exact date (most likely during Sunday imports) but I know this for fact because that is how I watched the movie recently.

 

 

Thanks. Maybe some of us should post a notice when these rare films are scheduled. I don't know how I missed it.

 

This film has Marlene Dietrich and Emil Jannings, and it was directed, photographed, and lit by Josef von Sternberg. Filmed in Berlin in 1930. With sound. And it shows an intelligent man making a fool out of himself for some cabaret dame, who led him down the road to complete ruin, even requiring him to wear a clown outfit at the very end. What more could a movie buff ask for? :)

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The Portage Theater in Chicago is screening Clara Bow's *CHILDREN OF DIVORCE (1927)* of course with Gary Cooper and Esther Ralston, in 35 Millimeter on April 13th.

 

April 13th, 2011

CHILDREN OF DIVORCE

Paramount production values are in full flower in this rarely screened Parisian melodrama. Clara Bow, Gary Cooper, and Esther Ralston are childhood chums going back to the convent days when their parents briefly orphaned them to accommodate a divorce. They grow up as frivolous, sensual spirits who know no sin except divorce. Cooper loves Ralston but marries Bow after a drunken debauch?can the matronly Hedda Hopper keep daughter Clara from repeating her mistakes? This famously troubled Frank Lloyd production was patched up and partially reshot by Josef von Sternberg, whose astonishing and delicate eight-year career at Paramount begins here. Die-hard auteurists will have fun identifying JvS?s scenes. Live Organ accompaniment by Jay Warren. (KW)

Frank Lloyd & Josef Von Sternberg ? 1927

Print preserved by the Library of Congress, special thanks to Rob Stone.

70 min ? Famous Players ? Lasky Corporation ? 35mm

 

 

Also Colleen Moore *ELLA CINDERS* (though 16 millimeter) on May 11th. This article clearly states that Colleen gave many of her now lost features to The Museum of Modern Art. And both they, and the technical rights holders, Warner Brother's allowed than to slip into ruin. *ELLA CINDERS* was originally 7 reels. But onl the 5 reel Kodascope abridgment survives

 

May 11th, 2011

ELLA CINDERS

Inspired by the syndicated comic strip by Bill Conselman (who wrote the screenplay for the Eddie Cantor film Whoopee! and Frank Borzage?s Young America), Ella Cinders stars Colleen Moore as a modern day Cinederella who escapes her rotten family to go to Hollywood, the land of promise and Harry Langdon. Chicagoans should recognize Moore?s name from her famous dollhouse now living at the Museum of Science and Industry, but sadly many of her films are unavailable to us as most of the 35mm materials were neglected after being sent from the Museum of Modern Art (where Moore herself had sent them to be preserved) to Warner Brothers. However, Ella Cinders still exists because of it?s non theatrical distribution on 16mm, and thanks to the work of private collectors and preservationists, we?re able to show it here. (JA)

Alfred E. Green ? 1926

60 min ? John McCormick Productions/First National ? 16mm

Short: Lulu in Hollywood (Izzi Sparber, Paramount, 1944) and selected Harry Langdon Short

 

 

http://www.northwestchicagofilmsociety.org/calendar/current-calendar/Current Calendar

 

 

Additionally, the 1926 Colleen Moore feature *TWINKLETOES* is screening at the British Silent Film Festival this month. Hopefully, in a new 35 Millimeter restoration. I will try and get more detailed information. Having seen a semi-complete version of this movie, it is a wonderful film.

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Sorry I would have posted a reminder if I knew it was not often shown on the network. Actually if I recall correctly it was shown sometime last summer. I recorded it because it was on really late but like a fool I didn't keep it. Maybe TCM will end up playing it again.

 

It is a really good movie. I actually think it is my favorite Sternberg film.

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nitratefiend -

 

I use a > at the beginning of a quote and it then puts it in a little box.

 

As for the New York cityscape - it was the one with the people from all walks of life, like Kinokima said - very beautiful, human. It was not *Manhatta*, though I've seen that one and liked it. Mahatta turns up on TCM occasionally between films.

 

I 've seen the Night on Bald Mountain by Windsor McKay only once, I think it aired on TCM but I might be mistaken. It's cool, but of course, everything McKay did was cool.

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Kinokina -

 

 

The poem for the tryptych was *In Youth Beside the Lonely Sea* by Thomas Bailey Aldrich.

 

 

 

 

*IN youth, beside the lonely sea,*

*Voices and visions came to me.*

 

*Titania and her furtive broods*

*Were my familiars in the woods.*

 

*From every flower that broke in flame,*

*Some half-articulate whisper came.*

 

*In every wind I felt the stir*

*Of some celestial messenger.*

 

*Later, amid the city s din*

 

*And toil and wealth and want and sin,*

 

*They followed me from street to street,*

*The dreams that made my boyhood sweet.*

 

*As in the silence-haunted glen,*

*So, mid the crowded ways of men,*

 

*Strange lights my errant fancy led,*

*Strange watchers watched beside my bed.*

 

*Ill fortune had no shafts for me*

*In this aerial company.*

 

*Now one by one the visions fly,*

*And one by one the voices die.*

 

*More distantly the accents ring,*

*More frequent the receding wing.*

 

*Full dark shall be the days in store,*

*When voice and vision come no more*

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=nitratefiend wrote:}{quote}

> "I liked the New York City film by ....well, I can't remember which one it was, but the director/cameraman was a genius."

 

Are you talking about the first one by Robert Flaherty? That's the first one that aired, the one that made some of the buildings look like mountains, and with all the scenes of the buildings and boats in the same image. I think that's the one that was titled "The Twenty Four Dollar Island."

 

Very unusual, because he used mainly telephoto lenses to compress the foreground images in with the background images. Most photographers use wide-angle lenses to photograph Manhattan.

 

The compression effect of using a telephoto lens makes the boats, bridges, and buildings seem closer together and very big.

 

Also, he shot a lot of close-ups to give a feeling of strength and massive size of the boats and buildings and construction equipment.

 

He knew exactly what he was doing and he knew the effect of using the telephoto lenses.

 

http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/images/reviews/81/1131132302.jpg

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No, I'm sorry to say after you wrote this lovely tribute that I wasn't talking about that one - but the one right after it. :D

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> No, I'm sorry to say after you wrote this lovely tribute that I wasn't talking about that one - but the one right after it. :D

 

Ok, that was a good one too. It had all the different people in it. :)

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The first one did have a lot power to it, with those looming images of architecture and steam.

 

The second one made New York City into the most fascinating place.... It had a great rhythm to it, and every shot was gorgeous and bustling.

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That was a great double-feature last night. Some very interesting stuff in both documentaries.

 

I liked the mechanical motions one, with all the weird gears turning with the music background. I've always wondered who invents that kind of machinery stuff.

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