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Ray Milland.


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Nice to see you back around these parts again! Enjoy your month of Ray and don't be such a stranger! :)

 

(((((did you ever manage to get any of those Gloria films? I have the memory of an elephant)))))

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My father, who wasn't an actor, happened to be in Lebanon in the early '70's and talked his way into an extras job on the set of "Embassy" (1972). He said Milland was pleasant but made it clear he wasn't too happy working on that one.

 

"The Thing with Two Heads" (1973)...whoa!

 

Edited by: Ascotrudgeracer on Apr 5, 2011 7:33 AM

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> (((((did you ever manage to get any of those Gloria films? I have the memory of an elephant)))))

 

Oh my goodness. YOU DO. Haha!

 

I did actually get to watch *The Big Heat*. Gloria was awesome.

 

Do you have any other recommendations? :-D

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*PLAYING ON TCM: TUESDAY 19 April, 2011 at 8:00 PM & 10:00 PM (EASTERN TIME)*

 

NOTE: Be sure monitor the "schedule" for errors or program changes.

 

*TWO of my FAVORITE Ray Milland period pieces: Kitty & Reap The Wild Wind*

 

Note: I think this may be the second time that Kitty has been shown on TCM in perhaps 3-4 or more years. I can't remember ever seeing Reap The Wild Wind on TCM (might be a premier for them?)

 

*8:00 PM EASTERN TIME*

 

*Kitty (1945)*

Nominated for an oscar for Best Art Direction.

Full screen B&W

103 mins.

Produced by: Mitchell Leisen

Directed by: Mitchell Leisen

Screenplay By: Karl Tunberg, Darrell Ware

Based on the novel By: Rosamond Marshall

Music by: Victor Young

 

MAIN CAST: Paulette Goddard, Ray Milland, Patric Knowles, XLNT cast of Great Supporting character actors including: Constance Collier, Cecil Kellaway, Reginald Owen, Dennis Hoey, Sara Allgood, and many more.

 

One of many and one of the best adaptive interpretations of George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion.

 

Paulette Goddard is an 18th century London Rags to Riches ( Eliza Doolittle ) guttersnipe, molded into the image of a "great" Lady by rascally rogue Ray Milland ( Mr. Higgins ).

 

Wikipedia Tidbit: To acquire a Cockney accent as Kitty, Paulette Goddard shared a room with the mother of actress Ida Lupino, who had quite a thick one for a time, and learned diction from Constance Collier. Upon seeing this film, the director Jean Renoir decided to cast Goddard in his film The Diary of a Chambermaid.

 

*10:00 PM EASTERN TIME*

 

*Reap the Wild Wind (1942)*

Nominated for 3 oscars (Art Direction, Cinematography) winning Best Special Effects

Full screen Color

123 mins.

Produced by: Cecil B. DeMille

Directed by: Cecil B. DeMille

Screenplay By: Alan LeMay, Jesse Lasky Jr., Charles Bennett, Jeanie Macpherson

Based on the novel By: Thelma Strabel

Music by: Victor Young

 

MAIN CAST: Ray Milland, John Wayne, Paulette Goddard, Raymond Massey, Robert Preston, Susan Hayward, Lynne Overman, Charles Bickford, With a host of great supporting character actors including: Louise Beavers, Hedda Hopper, Victor Kilian, Oscar Polk, James Flavin, Milburn Stone (Doc from "Gunsmoke"),

 

Great action film as only DeMille could do it.

 

1840's America is stretching it's commerce muscles and wooden ships powered by sail & early steam are manned by iron men and threatened by pirate wreckers.

 

Ray Milland and John Wayne (in one of his first anti-hero roles) vie for the same gorgeous lady: Paulette Goddard.

 

Some of my favorite action scenes: Milland, Wayne & Goddard team up to beat the gang hired to shanghai them and end up selling them to the whaling captain instead.

 

Wayne and Milland battle a giant squid.

 

The Southern Cross striking the reef, and later goes to the bottom, during the squall.

 

Tidbit: Ray Milland reportedly blamed the hair curling process used when making this film as responsible for his "premature" male pattern baldness.

 

Edited by: Stephan55 on Apr 5, 2011 7:46 PM

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> {quote:title=Stephan55 wrote:}{quote}

>

> *Reap the Wild Wind (1942)* .

>

> Ray Milland and John Wayne (in one of his first anti-hero roles) vie for the same gorgeous lady: Paulette Goddard.

>

 

*RtWW* is probably my favorite Wayne film, but he's no anti-hero, he's a normal guy turned villain, because he didn't trust his friends.

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*my favorite Wayne film, but he's no anti-hero, he's a normal guy turned villain, because he didn't trust his friends.*

 

Well, I first saw Reap the Wild Wind when I was a kid, and I was (and still am) a big John Wayne fan. As a kid I found the role John Wayne played in this film as complex and not the clear good guy vs bad guy as were most of his earlier roles.

Wayne starts out as a "good guy," But is railroaded, When he thinks he is being further railroaded he believes Massey and joins the dark side. I hated that because as the viewer I could see what was happening and kept yelling no, don't believe him, stay with the "force" (or words to that effect).

But Wayne goes along and wrecks the Southern Cross. Good guy turned bad = anti-hero.

For a moment we can see the turmoil going through his head, let Ray Milland drown with the evidence, and I'm home free...

But at the last minute he has a change of heart which costs him his life. Hero Again! yeah, but I hated seeing that water fill his helmet.

Deja vu in Wake of The Red Witch.

 

Wikipedia: In fiction, an antihero is generally considered to be a protagonist whose character is at least in some regards conspicuously contrary to that of the archetypal hero, and is in some instances its antithesis. Some consider the word's meaning to be sufficiently broad as to additionally encompass the antagonist who (in contrast to the archetypal villain) elicits considerable sympathy or admiration....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihero

 

BTW, of all the John Wayne films that I really like, if I were to choose only one as his best, IMO it would be The Searchers. Again he plays another kinda-sorta anti-hero type.

 

These were the films that helped me grow and understand that people aren't white & black, all good, or all bad, but many shades of grey,

 

Edited by: Stephan55 on Apr 5, 2011 8:56 PM

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To me, an anti-hero is a bad guy who does good. IMO, Wayne is a regular, neither bad nor overtly good, guy who goes bad, thus not an anti-hero. I don't think he was railroaded. As I said, he just didn't trust his friends, thus did Massey's evil bidding. But, yes, he did finally develop a conscience in the end, and try to redeem himself a bit. But, he can't really redeem what he has done.

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*To me, an anti-hero is a bad guy who does good.*

 

Likewise, and I also consider the term apropo for a good guy who does bad.

 

However in the end, Wayne kinda-sorta does fit your "anti-hero" definition, as he was more of a bad guy going down. But has a change of heart and does good, in the end.

 

It is a pretty subjective, evolving term with no clear concrete definition. Sort of "grey" (neither white, nor black, but a blend of both).

But I do agree with you. Wayne played a "regular" guy, neither really good, nor really bad, but an emotionally frail and complex person, capable of making mistakes with severe consequences.

 

This was a "coming of age" film for me, as I was beginning to grasp these concepts and possibilities. It was also the first film that I saw where John Wayne died. "Bad" guys died, "Good" guys lived, that was the "code" of Hollywood. And John Wayne had always (up until that time) clearly been a "good" guy, to me.

What a shock for an impressionable, young, fatherless, latchkey boy. My father figures were my movie heros. I wanted to grow up and be like them. And in those days a lot of the older movies I saw followed the "morals clause." But for me, for the first time, Wayne was playing this complex, very "human" character.

 

When I say railroaded, I meant that the first sinking was not Waynes fault, none-the-less he was blamed for it. He had people both for and against him, but because of the perceived conflicted triangle between himself, Paulette Goddard & Ray Milland, it was easy for him to believe that Milland was going to further railroad him. This was of course in his mind, and we (the audience) could see that he was mistaken, but the end result was his pursuasion to join the dark side and reap the foul reward of becoming what he thought he'd already been judged guilty of being.

 

Pretty complex plot for a kid to grasp. And when I watch it again this month (lord willing) I may be taken back to that innocence of youth when good was good, and bad was bad, and Wayne was neither, ...and both....

 

Edited by: Stephan55 on Apr 5, 2011 9:52 PM

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> {quote:title=Stephan55 wrote:}{quote}

> *To me, an anti-hero is a bad guy who does good.*

>

> Likewise, and I also consider the term apropo for a good guy who does bad.

>

 

I guess I'd call that an anti-anti-hero... :) Perhaps if an anti-hero, and an anti-anti-hero met, they would have all their matter converted into energy, in a huge filmic explosion...

 

I was a bit of a latch-key kid too, as my parents divorced when I was 14. I didn't see the film until I was in my 20's. I didn't care for the sort of character Wayne usually played, IMO self righteous heroes, so I liked seeing him play a conflicted bad guy.

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*Perhaps if an anti-hero, and an anti-ant-hero met, they would have all their matter converted into energy, in a huge filmic explosion...*

 

And then we'd have this DeMille epic Reap The Wild Wind...

LOL :)

 

Very funny analogy, you like science too!

Matter vs Anti Matter, Dark Matter vs Dark Energy! Inner Space vs Outer Space, Expanding vs Contracting universe, or a combination of both, or neither!

I also like Carl Sagan

 

Edited by: Stephan55 on Apr 5, 2011 10:16 PM

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> {quote:title=ILoveRayMilland wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> > (((((did you ever manage to get any of those Gloria films? I have the memory of an elephant)))))

>

> Oh my goodness. YOU DO. Haha!

>

> I did actually get to watch *The Big Heat*. Gloria was awesome.

>

> Do you have any other recommendations? :-D

 

Oh good. I'll post something in the Gloria thread over in Hot Topics for you and that way we can keep this thread focused on your main man Ray Milland! So look for it later over there. :)

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Stephan, I'm another fan of Kitty and Reap the Wild Wind. Ray Milland and Paulette Goddard make a good team. Hope some of us saw or taped The Crystal Ball last night. A charming comedy, especially for those of us who love Paulette. Good cast, funny situations. Better than some more famous comedies.

 

A Woman of Distinction had its moments. The pairing of Ray with Rosalind Russell works, and Roz has some good slapstick moments. What most people today will not like is the choice Roz is given of having a successful career or being a Woman. Edmund Gwenn's speech about this is pretty obnoxious, especially since he's saying this to his daughter. Kris Kringle ain't supposed to do this!

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*kingrat & finance*

 

I recorded most of the Ray Milland movies played that night, so far I've watched The Crystal Ball (Goddard & Milland always seem to make a great pairing), and re-watched The Major And The Minor, another Billy Wilder hit!

Have yet to watch Irene, The Bachelor Father, & A Woman of Distinction, but looking forward to it.

 

A trippy little Ray Milland film that really added to my cold war paronia was Panic in the Year Zero (released July 5, 1962) also directed by Ray Milland. It was low budget but bit me like a bulldog.

And then came the Cuban Missle Crisis that October....

Unfortunately that movie is still as relevant today as it was when I first saw it from the backseat at a drive-in.

 

I also liked Milland in some of his offbeat roles like Dr. Xavier in X: The Man with the X Ray Eyes (1963) Directed by Roger Corman. It made me think about possibilities vs consequences....

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Hope all the Ray Milland films got to watch or record SO EVIL MY LOVE. I really enjoyed this one. RO pointed out that the director, Lewis Allen, had also directed Milland in THE UNINVITED. Won't say much until more of you have had a chance to watch. Good cast, and the story took some unexpected turns.

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