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reused movie sets


RiverLily

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Did any of you also notice this? When watching today's showing, I thought I recognized Gig Young's living room in "The Gay Sisters" (1942). It also looks like the Brewster sisters front room from "Arsenic and Old Lace" (1944). Both movies are Warner Bros. productions.

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Most studios do this but Warners' was particularly well-known for it. Was it any coincidence that The Sea Hawk and Elizabeth and Essex were made a year apart so The Sea Hawk could use Elizabeth's castle a second time around! It's also used in The Adventures of Don Juan!

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Cecil B. DeMille had the sets for the 1923 *The Ten Commandments* bulldozed and buried in the Guadalupe Dunes, where they were built. Today, they are a recognized archeological site. That's one form of reuse.

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Did you ever notice that the facade of Mildred's Restaurant in *Mildred Pierce* and the facade of the Yale party in *Roughly Speaking* (both 1945 Warner Bros. with Jack Carson) are one and the same? Guess Jack Warner wanted to economize a bit....

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Then there's the New York City/urban streetscape, usually in a T where two streets meet perpendicularly. the houses are usually row houses/brownstones with stoops. All studio back lots seem to have one of these. 20th Century Fox also had a London version, where a row of brick townhouses are lined up. HANGOVER SQUARE is just one of many films that utilized this.

 

Most studios had several semi-permanent sets on the backlot, that would be reused constantly, sometimes with little alteration.

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Speaking of re-using movie sets, there is a beautiful winding staircase that has been used countless times in Warner Bros. movies, including "Auntie Mame." Warner Bros. must have loved that staircase, since it was used so many times.

 

Terrence.

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The back and partial stage-left wall of Papinoff's office in *The Saint in New York* (1938) is the same as is used in Duke Bates' office in *The Saint's Double Trouble* (1940). It bothers me because in the former the entry door is stage right and this is no door stage-left but in the latter the entry door is stage left and there is a back-room door stage right.

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