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what makes a film a noir flick? is it a certain camera angle or artsy visual technique, does the term strictly belong to a certain era in cinematic history (early 40's to late 50's), mabey its the gritty storylines, or does it have more to do with acting techniques? i think the exact definition of film noir will always be an elusive phenomenon. here are some noir classics i would love to see on tcm:

 

Shadow of a Doubt

Double Indemnity

Detour

The Killers

Out of the Past

Force of Evil

The Naked City

The Night of the Hunter

 

mabey some of these are already scheduled, i dunno i would check but Doorway To Hell is about to come on, and i can't miss this cagney classic.

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Your list is very good.

 

We have discussed this and debated this for years. :)

 

I say that this film type began in the US in 1940 with "The Stranger on the Third Floor",

and that it should have a lot of low-key lighting (not much lighting from the front), a lot

of side and back lighting. A lot of scenes shot at night and in lonely or sleazy parts of

town. A few Dutch Tilts help, but aren't required. Lots of diagonal lines and shadows

help quite a lot. Many noirs are narrated by someone, and others contain surrealistic

dream sequences.

 

This is great noir photography from "Stranger on the Third Floor":

 

http://www.jahsonic.com/Stranger.jpg

 

The film often has a bad dame in it, and a sap who falls for her, but it could be a

good dame who falls for a hard-luck criminal type of sleazy guy.

 

There are some pre-noir films, such as "Crime and Punishment" (1935), which is

very much like a noir. Some people might say that "M" (1931) is the first true noir.

 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_zGreRPcsAtg/SOtCSJEpDhI/AAAAAAAAAJo/DlnxwXgvFOs/s320/Crime-and-punishment2.jpg

 

http://www.traces.org/programs%20images/M.jpeg

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> {quote:title=kaleman wrote:}{quote}

> Is "Red Light" directed by Roy Del Ruth considered film noir?

 

 

Having just watched it, I would say - most definitely! Great noir lighting. About the only thing not generally considered noirish that it does is the emphasis on the bad guy getting it from God, at the end. Even so, the physical aspects of the end are very noir.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=kaleman wrote:}{quote}

> > Is "Red Light" directed by Roy Del Ruth considered film noir?

>

>

> Having just watched it, I would say - most definitely! Great noir lighting. About the only thing not generally considered noirish that it does is the emphasis on the bad guy getting it from God, at the end. Even so, the physical aspects of the end are very noir.

 

 

I would agree, wow, great flick!

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i wouldn't mind if tcm showed Criss Cross (1949). starring Burt Lancaster and Yvonne DeCarlo. never seen it. here's the plot summary:

Romantic, obsessive Steve Thompson is drawn back to L.A. to make another try for Anna, his former wife. However, Anna belongs now to the L.A. underworld. Steve believes he can rescue her, ignoring the advice and warnings of people who would try to save him. He commits himself to a dangerous course of action that quickly takes everyone somewhere unintended.

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