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Mabel Albertson


annelovestcm
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I always thought the diner was the little local Mayberry place

that was pretty basic and Morrelli's was a fancier restaurant

somewhere near Mayberry. At the diner people always seemed

to be running into one another, quite often leading to one of

Helen's jealousy fits. It does get confusing.

 

Yes when Andy's female relative came to stay, he was just being

kind and trying to keep her mind off her recent breakup. It wasn't

long before Helen and Aunt Bee were giving him all kinds of problems.

The relative also looked a little like Helen. It didn't take long for

Miss Crump to go into one of her patented hissy fits. No good deed

goes unpunished.

 

The color episode with Andy being held by the two bank robbers while

Howard and Otis are trying to rescue him is a bit similar to the bw

episode with the three women convicts holding Barney and Floyd. He

man Howard takes the cup of water that he is supposed to throw out

the window in an attempt to wake up Otis and, on the first try, throws

it right in Andy's face. Oh brother.

 

 

I remember that later dancing episode when Andy promises Opie he won't

force him to go to the dance. Of course he ends up making him go anyway.

Then Andy has to do a modern dance. He looked like a man running in place

with a hotfoot, though Helen had no problem getting down.

 

 

In the episode where Howard Sprague is introduced, Andy mentions that

Howard went to high school with him and that even back then he sort

of kept to himself and was a little eccentric. Some things don't change.

It is funny on TV shows how some characters just seem to drop in all

of a sudden.

 

 

I got a kick out of the episode where Jack Dodson played the insurance man

who Andy called to file a claim for Aunt Bee's "missing" brooch. He thought

Andy wanted to buy additional insurance. A claim? You want to file a claim?

Gee, I guess I have a claim form in here somewhere.

 

 

 

They did make a lot of accommodations for Howard McNear after his stroke.

He is sitting down most of the time and he doesn't use his bad arm if it can

be helped. He was surely missed, because Floyd was a little bit out there,

though in a low key and humorous kind of way. Maybe everybody had to drive

over to Mt. Pilot to the big deal shop with three or four chairs. Just wasn't

the same.

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Yes, they recycled past episode plots often. (I guess after awhile you run out of plot ideas) I dont know how many time they did the escaped convict with a grudge against Barney one.....

 

Helen was often unreasonably jealous. If there was ever a new single gal in town, you could bet the plot point would be Helen having a tiff over it. SO predictable! LOL.

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I suppose there were only so many plots that a 1960s comedy could use

before it was time to recycle them with minor variations. Just about every

show of the period that had a kid as one of the stars had a running away

from home story, a crush on the teacher tale, the first date/dance, etc.

 

Helen's jealousy did make for an easy plot point to pull out whenever things

got boring. It did get predictable, but the sheer nuttiness of her reactions was

funny...up to a point.

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>Shemp wrote:

>The anniversary watch episode, "Barney's Physical," was from the 5th season. Howard McNear returned to the GRIFFITH SHOW during (approx.) last 1/3 of the 4th season, appearing in "Divorce Mountain Style," "The Rumor" (the only episode where he shared a scene with Jim Nabors, whose 'Gomer' character was originally introduced to fill the void created when McNear suffered his first stroke), and a couple other episodes.

 

That's interesting. IMDB lists four episodes he was in between his last episode before the stroke ("Convicts at Large") and "Barney's Physical." The four episodes were "Andy Saves Gomer," "Divorce, Mountain Style," "The Rumor," and "Back to Nature." A few years ago when TV Land was running TAGS more heavily than it does now, after "Convicts at Large" would air, I would begin watching for Floyd's return, and I don't remember seeing him in any of those episodes. The first one I would always see him in was "Barney's Physical." I wonder if his scenes in those episodes have been cut for commercials in syndication on TV Land. Do you remember what scenes he was in in those episodes? I guess I could check my DVDs, but I hate having to haul those out and wade through the commercials and FBI warnings.

 

I read somewhere that not only Gomer, but also the Darlings, Ernest T. Bass, Malcolm Meriwether, and maybe several other characters that I can't remember, were tried out to fill the void left by McNear after his stroke. Is there any truth to that?

 

>GRIFFITH wasn't the only show to accomdate Howard. Prior to his illness, McNear made some bit appearances on GUNSMOKE as the proprietor of the general store (he costarred on the 1950s radio show as 'Doc'). When he returned to work in 1964, GUNSMOKE brought him back a few more times. He stopped doing GUNSMOKE when Don Knotts left the GRIFFITH SHOW, and the 'Howard' and 'Goober' characters were given more screen time.

 

What did giving the Howard and Goober characters more screen time on TAGS have to do with McNear not doing any more episodes of Gunmoke? I saw him working in the general store on Gunsmoke in a few episodes (his character's name was Howard too), but I didn't realize any of them were after the stroke. In fact, I've seen some of these episodes on the Westerns channel recently and during the James Arness tribute. I remember Dabbs Greer, who had several roles on TAGS, playing store owner Mr. Jonas in the early days of Gunsmoke with Chester, and later Woodrow Chambliss, who was one of the butter and egg men as well as the owner of the organ sold to the church on TAGS, would play Mr. Lathrop running the store on Gunsmoke during some of the color years. Also, I believe Parley Baer (Mayor Stoner) played Chester in the radio version of Gunsmoke. Lots of interesting connections between those two shows.

 

>We never see a barber in Mayberry again, until the 3rd season episode of RFD "Hair", when Emmett decides to buy a toupee. Obviously, it wasn't the same barbershop storefront; in fact, that was the year RFD moved exterior shooting from Culver City's 40 Acres backlot, to the WB backlot in Burbank. The barber? Played by none other than Allan Melvin, in his 9th visit to Mayberry.

 

Gee, I really thought he guest-starred more often than that on TAGS. He played a bad guy in a lot of episodes and a good guy occasionally (Army recruiter, hotel detective). It seemed like in was in about three episodes a season. He only made eight appearances on TAGS?

 

>By late season 8, and the introduction of Ken Berry in "Sam For Town Council," it was implied that the town had reorganized its government, and no longer had a mayor; the head of the Town Council (Sam) was the defacto mayor. The portrayal of the Council and Sam during all 3 seasons of RFD supports that presumption.

 

What were the implications in "Sam for Town Council" or other episodes late in season 8 of TAGS that there was no longer a mayor and the town government had been reorganized? I haven't seen any but maybe they are in scenes that have been cut for syndication on TV Land.

 

Mayberry had a town council in the very first season and Mayor Pike seemed to be the head of it. It looked like Andy and Barney were on it, and sometimes Floyd or some of the town businessmen, and then Ellie Walker was elected. One time the actor who played Chester, who played checkers with Burt Mustin's character Jud, was on the town council. His character was usually the one trying to get Barney in trouble--like reminding Gomer in "Citizen's Arrest" that Barney had insulted him, trying to fuel the flames, or bringing the fact that the Governor's car was illegally parked to Barney's attention. Later his character's name would be Jase (like when Gomer quit working for Wally). I wish they would have kept the name the same--it would have added a nice bit of continuity. I think there was a continuity problem with Burt Mustin's character--didn't Andy and Aunt Bee both call him "Burt" in the episode "The Barbershop Quarter?" Not sure if that was intentional or not.

 

Speaking of continuity--the character who played bank guard Asa would play a veterinarian in the episode with the milk man's horse, and then he would play the doctor in the episode in which Andy gets sick. That was quite a career change. Speaking of the milk man, when Aunt Bee pretends to be courting the butter and egg man, at the end they switch to a different butter and egg man--just how big is this supposedly small town that they have so many butter and egg men and milk men?

 

Also, there was an episode in which Howard ran against Aunt Bee for town council. I don't believe I had ever seen this episode until a few years ago, even though I watched the show a lot as a kid, though I was never such a big fan of the show as to be an expert on it. I've talked to several other huge TAGS fans in recent years who said they'd never seen that episode until recently, either. What happened to Howard being on the town council? Was he still on it when Sam ran for town council, or was that plot point just dropped?

 

>The Mayor character was dropped for several reasons, per writers Jack Elinson and Harvey Bullock, who each were past guests at Mayberry Days in Mt. Airy NC. One, it was decided that the character was unnecessary to create conflict for Andy; the situations created by Barney, Gomer, Floyd, etc., served that function well. And budgetary reasons... salaries of the regular cast were going up, production inflation, and Jim Nabors was elevated to recurring costar status. Only so much screen time to go around to a fairly large cast for a 1/2-hour ensemble-format sitcom.

 

I never liked Stoner but I missed Mayor Pike after Dick Elliott died. I thought he added a nice dimension to the show. I don't agree with the writers that the mayor was an unnecessary character, any more than Goober or Floyd or some of the others. They seemed to rotate in plenty of characters like Clara, Tillie, Otis, Ernest T. Bass, Reverend Tucker (I like the way his character was still there in the very last season), etc., so I don't see why one more character could not have been in the rotation--just someone other than the grumpy Stoner. The budget didn't preclude rotating those characters in and out. One of the reasons I liked the show was the feeling that there was a whole town there, and the mayor helped flesh out the town, IMO.

 

Harvey Bullock wrote some of my favorite TAGS episodes, including my very favorite, "The Big House"--when you can pull off the same joke three times in a row (Barney letting the prisoners escape) and keep it fresh and funny every time, you're really good. Because he also wrote for Gomer Pyle, USMC, I used to wonder if he wrote the Navy episode in which Gomer keeps destroying the inflatable boat Carter and company were in, since that was a three-times-in-a-row joke. I loved seeing Gomer leap off the ship right through through the inflatable boat. As it turns out, he didn't write that one. And Bullock wrote other favorites of mine on TAGS like "The Loaded Goat" and "The Haunted House." He also wrote for The Jetsons as I have seen his name on quite a few of those episodes on Boomerang. There is someone I would loved to have met and asked him questions about the show, although it's too late now. I guess it must have been great to see him and Elinson at Mayberry Days. I have never been to Mayberry Days.

 

Robbie

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I always thought the diner was the little local Mayberry place that was pretty basic and Morrelli's was a fancier restaurant somewhere near Mayberry. At the diner people always seemed to be running into one another, quite often leading to one of Helen's jealousy fits. It does get confusing.

 

That was supposed to be the difference, but it seemed like the nicer place with the checked tablecloths and the fancy latticework behind the booth near the entrance was sometimes used as Morrelli's and sometimes used as the diner, whereas a plainer location was also used as the diner in earlier episodes.

 

>I remember that later dancing episode when Andy promises Opie he won't force him to go to the dance. Of course he ends up making him go anyway. Then Andy has to do a modern dance. He looked like a man running in place with a hotfoot, though Helen had no problem getting down.

 

I think Andy changed his mind about making Opie go to the dance after he saw that Opie's unwillingness to face this fear head on might cause him to miss out on some social opportunities with his friends, as he saw Sharon Porter (a nice character carried over from earlier seasons, with some name changes) and Johnny Paul Jason (also a nice carryover from earlier seasons, and formerly Little Ricky from I Love Lucy !) go off together while Opie is left alone kicking a can or something down the street. Andy did look like he was running in place with a hotfoot at the dance--that's a great description! Helen always looked like she was very modern and "hip" to the younger generation, more so than most of the rest of Mayberry, particularly in the episode where she puts on the school musical. BTW, she is directing a high school musical--is she still Opie's teacher, and is he in high school now? One might argue she is the teacher for all grades in such a small town, but in the "Three Wishes for Opie" episode it's established that she only teaches one grade at a time.

 

I'm not alone in my unease with her character. I've read numerous posts in other forums in which viewers felt Helen Crump was too difficult too often or was out of place in Mayberry, much as some felt Mayor Stoner didn't seem to fit in. I didn't feel she was out of place--after all, they established she moved there from Kansas. People can and do move to small Southern towns from other parts of the country, particularly if their work takes them there. I just thought she got too jealous too often At other times she was very nice, like when she stood by Andy when the rest of the town turned against him when he called Opie "out" as umpire during the baseball game.

 

The issue with Helen--and yes, Andy too--getting too jealous too often, reminds me of a little spoof TV Land once did of Leave It to Beaver in which they try to explain "scientifically" why Beaver never "learns his lesson." They show a photo with superimposed animation of information going in one ear and directly out the other. It really bugged me that Beaver lets his friends talk him into trouble over and over again. It was OK the first few times Larry Mondello did it, but when it kept happening over and over again, even with Gilbert and Richard doing it to him in the later grades near the end of the show, I got sick of the overused plot line. I still liked the other episodes, but I would usually skip watching the "friend talks Beaver into doing something he already knows he shouldn't do" episodes when they would air again on TV Land.

 

Some people have told me that they noticed that Andy seems grumpier or more irritable in the color episodes. I wasn't aware of it until they told me, and it does seem to me now that I'm looking for it that he is not the easygoing fellow he was in the earlier seasons. Also, Floyd was very easygoing in the earlier seasons (enjoying a banana while being held hostage, easily adapting to the female convicts' conventions: "If those burgers burn, Al, I won't be held responsible,"), but seems more irritable and calculating in later seasons: telling Goober "Fraud! I charge fraud"; trying to manipulate matters so a statue of his ancestor is made instead of Andy's. Did the writers explain at Mayberry Days why this change was made to these characters? Maybe they made the characters grumpier so conflict could evolve without the need for the grumpy Mayor Stoner...

 

>In the episode where Howard Sprague is introduced, Andy mentions that Howard went to high school with him and that even back then he sort of kept to himself and was a little eccentric. Some things don't change. It is funny on TV shows how some characters just seem to drop in all of a sudden.

 

Yeah, I was trying to remember why it looked odd that Howard dropped in all of sudden, and the points you mention about Andy having gone to school with him and Howard having kept to himself--which are in the famous matchmaking episode with Helen and the nurse, I believe, that we have been discussing a lot--make it seem unusual that Howard is suddenly in every episode and "one of the gang." These are the points I was trying to remember, but couldn't.

 

Another inconsistency: at the end of the third episode in season 7, "The Barbershop Quartet," Andy mentions the bowling league is coming up, and Howard says he's developing some kind of condition on his thumb and may not be able to play. Then in the second episode of season 8, "Howard, the Bowler", they are reluctant to let Howard join their team because even though they've never seen him play, they think he probably isn't a good bowler. Whereas in the barbershop quarter episode from season 7 it is implied Howard was at one time a member of the bowling team with Andy.

 

>I got a kick out of the episode where Jack Dodson played the insurance man who Andy called to file a claim for Aunt Bee's "missing" brooch. He thought Andy wanted to buy additional insurance. A claim? You want to file a claim? Gee, I guess I have a claim form in here somewhere.

 

I get a kick out of that episode too. That's the insurance game for you. It's the only business I know of where they look for technicalities to get out of providing the service you have been paying for. When you buy a loaf a bread at the store, after you have paid for it, they don't try to withhold the bread from you, saying things like, "well, this is Tuesday and purchases on Tuesdays are invalid" or "you didn't fill in this line correctly on this form when you signed up as a rewards customer at this store."

 

Robbie

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After Don Knotts left the show and Jack Burns didn't work out,

I think they started to highlight other characters to fill the void,

such as Goober and Howard Sprague and Emmett, though I don't

remember the exact chronology. I remember reading, in particular

reference to Ernest T. Bass, that certain characters were so vivid

that they couldn't be regulars but had to be limited in the number

of episodes they appeared in. That might apply to the Darling family

too, whereas Goober or Howard could appear in quite a few episodes.

I really never thought too much about Helen being a pain. I sort of

accepted her jealousy as a comic device that came in handy in a

plot situation and didn't take it all that seriously. Outside of that she

was usually a kind character. The confusion about what grade she is

teaching was probably one of those things that the writers switched

around to suit a story and didn't think too much about, just as certain

characters get a political position and it's never mentioned again. It

might have been a good idea to have a story about Howard the landlord

and Emmett as the new tenant. I think Emmett was just as tight with

a buck as Floyd (or Howard).

 

Mayor Pike was a slightly confused soul, but was usually pretty nice,

but Stoner (you can't go by a name) was a pure pompous pain in the

neck. I suppose there are a few characters like that in a small town,

though he seems more suited to the city. Either way, a little of him

goes a long way.

 

In the last few seasons Opie wore a shirt with a large orange and

green check pattern that he seemed to wear in every third episode.

It's hard not to notice it. I know Andy didn't make a lot of money,

but it couldn't have been that bad.

 

I never caught the contradiction about Howard and the bowling team.

I just remember that after he bowled his perfect game, Andy let him keep

the shirt and it was presumed that was the end of his being on the team.

I remember the episode where Howard was acting as a big brother and

fell for his pupil's sister. He tries to pretend he knows about baseball and

can't even get the names of the teams straight-the Baltimore Cardinals

or the St. Louis Orioles. Another nail in the nerdy coffin.

 

You've got to hand it to Asa, from bank guard to doctor, and at an advanced

age too. It's quite an accomplishment.

 

Poor Beaver was apt to be tricked by his friends, over and over again.

Larry and Richard were bad enough, but Gilbert was really tricky. Beaver

never learning his lesson reminds me of Barney, who would be embarrassed

by one of his brags or exaggerations, but next time he started it all over again.

 

 

 

 

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>After Don Knotts left the show and Jack Burns didn't work out, I think they started to highlight other characters to fill the void, such as Goober and Howard Sprague and Emmett, though I don't remember the exact chronology.

 

Goober came first...in fact, there was a slight overlap between him and Gomer, so I think Goober had to have been introduced in the fourth season, as, if I remember correctly, Gomer left at the end of season 4 to do his own show. Goober had been mentioned by Gomer in at least two episodes before he actually appeared with Gomer (they ended up with the "Fun Girls" in one episode--"Judy, Judy, Judy!"). Ironically, both of the mentions of Goober in which he didn't actually appear (there may have been more, these are just the two I remember) occurred in "slow pace of Mayberry" themed episodes. One was one of my favorites, "The Sermon for Today" ("could be spiders!"), in which Goober couldn't help out because he had to wash his mother's car but he had loaned Gomer his tools. The other was "Man in a Hurry," in which Gomer said Goober could fix the man's car but Goober was away fishing. Then Goober returned and fixed the man's car, although the man had had a change of heart about leaving by then.

 

Howard came sometime after Warren left. Emmett didn't show up until the last season, as a replacement for Floyd.

 

Another inconsistency: in "Man in a Hurry," only Wally and Goober could fix the man's car, and Wally refused to work on Sunday. Wally was depicted as being the real mechanical expert. Gomer could only provide water and gas and seemed to be as dumb as a post. Then in the episode "Gomer the House Guest," Gomer's customers follow him to Andy's house when Gomer is fired, because they trust Gomer to work on their cars more than they trust Wally. What a switch!

 

>I remember reading, in particular reference to Ernest T. Bass, that certain characters were so vivid that they couldn't be regulars but had to be limited in the number of episodes they appeared in. That might apply to the Darling family too, whereas Goober or Howard could appear in quite a few episodes. I really never thought too much about Helen being a pain. I sort of accepted her jealousy as a comic device that came in handy in a plot situation and didn't take it all that seriously. Outside of that she was usually a kind character. The confusion about what grade she is teaching was probably one of those things that the writers switched around to suit a story and didn't think too much about, just as certain characters get a political position and it's never mentioned again. It might have been a good idea to have a story about Howard the landlord and Emmett as the new tenant. I think Emmett was just as tight with a buck as Floyd (or Howard).

 

In one of the cast reunion specials (not the TV movie Return to Mayberry ) shown on CBS, one of the producers--I think it was Aaron Ruben, but I'm not certain--said Ernest T. Bass was the only broadly drawn character the show ever had. I'm not sure I agree that he was the only one. The Darlings seemed pretty far out, too, sometimes recognizing Andy's authority and sometimes holding a shotgun on him (which I think technically he could have arrested them for.) I never liked the episodes with the Darlings or with Ernest T. Bass very much. I didn't think the plots were very good, believable, or funny. I did like the music of the Dillards a lot, however. I also enjoyed Charlene singing "Salty Dog" and especially "There Is a Time."

 

I've thought of a few others over the years that also seemed broadly drawn to me, but I can't remember any of them right now.

 

>Mayor Pike was a slightly confused soul, but was usually pretty nice, but Stoner (you can't go by a name) was a pure pompous pain in the neck. I suppose there are a few characters like that in a small town, though he seems more suited to the city. Either way, a little of him goes a long way.

 

A lot of fans I've talked to had the impression he was a big city slicker--possibly not even from a Southern city--that had moved to Mayberry.

 

>In the last few seasons Opie wore a shirt with a large orange and green check pattern that he seemed to wear in every third episode. It's hard not to notice it. I know Andy didn't make a lot of money, but it couldn't have been that bad.

 

I like plaid shirts so it never bothered me. The orange turtlenecks in "Opie's Group" were a bit too far out for me, though.

 

>I never caught the contradiction about Howard and the bowling team. I just remember that after he bowled his perfect game, Andy let him keep the shirt and it was presumed that was the end of his being on the team.

 

It was definitely there. Howard had been referenced as being part of a bowling team or league with Andy in season 7. Perhaps it was his first time and his thumb condition caused him to drop out, so technically he never played. :-) Yet it's unlikely he would have been part of the team/league if they didn't know if he could bowl OK or not.

 

>I remember the episode where Howard was acting as a big brother and fell for his pupil's sister. He tries to pretend he knows about baseball and can't even get the names of the teams straight-the Baltimore Cardinals or the St. Louis Orioles. Another nail in the nerdy coffin.

 

Ironically, that episode aired on TV Land just a few hours after you posted your message yesterday (Saturday). It also repeated again on TV Land this afternoon (Sunday). Gomer's girlfriend from Gomer Pyle, USMC played the sister.

 

>You've got to hand it to Asa, from bank guard to doctor, and at an advanced age too. It's quite an accomplishment.

 

Let's not forget veterinarian! (I guess it's not as big a leap from "critter doctor" to "people doctor" as it is from bank guard to the other two.)

 

>Poor Beaver was apt to be tricked by his friends, over and over again. Larry and Richard were bad enough, but Gilbert was really tricky. Beaver never learning his lesson reminds me of Barney, who would be embarrassed by one of his brags or exaggerations, but next time he started it all over again.

 

Yep, Barney would go overboard and arrest everybody in town when Andy was away, then he would become super militant all over again in other episodes in Andy's absence as well. "Let's break out the teargas!" Of course, at the end of that episode when Andy gets everybody to turn themselves in to Barney--including himself--that may have countered any lesson Barney was supposed to have learned.

 

Warren seemed to be overly gung-ho as well, like when he arrested Aunt Bee's group for gambling (bingo?). These guys were the Frank Burns of Mayberry. Hmm, Andy does seem a lot like Henry Blake in terms of being very easygoing. I would have thought they would have tried to have Barney's replacement be very different from Barney, yet Warren seemed to be overly gung-ho and a goof-up much of the time as well.

 

Robbie

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They broadcast the Goober's contest episode yesterday on TVLand. The one where Floyd wins and Goober cant pay him. Was that Floyd's last appearance? (Fraud!) I noticed they did a lot of close up shots of Floyd's face, which struck me as odd, as they didnt do it with any of the other actors.........

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I guess the episode where Goober did his Cary Grant impression was one

of his first or maybe the first. Then he did Edward G. Robinson (All right

you guys), and ended up with Chester from Gunsmoke. Don't give up that

day job, son.

 

 

One of those strange coincidences. I did watch it on Sunday. Howard asked

the kid which team is his favorite and he says the Dodgers. Yeah, St. Louis,

Howard answers. Oops. Then he confuses the Orioles with the Cardinals. "Guess

I got my birds mixed up." Yeah, I guess so. I knew the actress who played the

big sister was on Gomer Pyle, but I haven't watched it in such a long time I didn't

remember exactly what role she played.

 

 

 

They also showed the one where Goober ran the Cash Grab contest. As

already mentioned, Floyd was pretty ornery for most of that episode, ending

with his cries of Fraud. I noticed one scene where you see him at the door

of the courthouse and Andy's talking on the phone, then there's a shot of

Andy on the phone and in the next shot Floyd is sitting by Andy's desk,

obviously to save Howard McNear the trouble of walking across the office.

 

 

 

The episodes on Sunday were from the last of the seventh season and the

first of the last season. In three out of the four Ope is wearing that green

and orange shirt. I don't have anything against plaid shirts, it's just that

it showed up so often it became funny.

 

 

 

The man who ran the print shop in the Goober's contest episode turned up

as the salesman in the men's store in the episode where Opie gets stood up

by Mary Alice Carter for Arnold's birthday party. Mayberry must have had a

very fluid labor market.

 

 

 

The Darlings and Ernest T. Bass were okay, but they were never particular

favorites of mine. I did like the episode where Goober lowers the owl from

the tree onto the Darlings car and they never make the connection. I don't

think Malcom Merriweather was ever considered as a regular, and he wasn't

as out there as the Darling or Ernest T., and he was a nice guy, but like

those charcters, a little of Malcolm went a long way.

 

 

 

 

 

Warren was as gung ho and by the book as Barney, but he seemed a tiny bit

brighter and somewhat more courageous, and not quite as much of a braggart

as old Barn, but everything is relative.

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Yes, I noticed that cut from Floyd at the door to sitting at Andy's desk. They found ways to get around his infirmity. I'm thinking those close-ups may have fed into that too somehow.........

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I think that actress' name was Ellen Macrae or something similar. She was on the Gomer Pyle show as his girlfriend for awhile. She also had a small part in The Conversation movie with Gene Hackman.......Did anyone notice the white go-go boots? LOL. Did dance halls still exist in the 60s???

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Yeah, the go-go boots were a hoot. Unusual footwear for a ballroom dance

place. Maybe some places still had dance halls back then, or maybe it was

just a plot contrivance. She did tell Howard it was strictly legitimate, just in

case he was wondering. Can you imagine what Ma Sprague would have said

about her boy going to that place?

 

Didn't she play the working girl who was trying to seduce Hackman so she could

steal something from him? Her accent was very distinctive.

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>One of those strange coincidences. I did watch it on Sunday. Howard asked the kid which team is his favorite and he says the Dodgers. Yeah, St. Louis, Howard answers. Oops. Then he confuses the Orioles with the Cardinals. "Guess I got my birds mixed up." Yeah, I guess so. I knew the actress who played the big sister was on Gomer Pyle, but I haven't watched it in such a long time I didn't remember exactly what role she played.

 

I probably know as little about sports as Howard did.

 

>The episodes on Sunday were from the last of the seventh season and the first of the last season. In three out of the four Ope is wearing that green and orange shirt. I don't have anything against plaid shirts, it's just that it showed up so often it became funny.

 

I liked the color, so I didn't mind seeing it often. I misunderstood you though--I see what you mean that it was the frequency of him wearing it, rather than the color itself, that suggested Andy might not have been making enough money. In a lot of these sitcoms, the characters wear the same clothes over and over again. Edith was often shown wearing the same green or orange dress over and over again on All in the Family. I'm not sure if they did it to save money on costumes, or to enhance character identification in the viewer's mind.

 

>The man who ran the print shop in the Goober's contest episode turned up as the salesman in the men's store in the episode where Opie gets stood up by Mary Alice Carter for Arnold's birthday party. Mayberry must have had a very fluid labor market.

 

Yeah, I mentioned that just a few posts back in this thread. I'll paste that in here:

 

>voranis wrote:

>His face was very stiff and his speech very slurred in "Goober's Contest." At one point it seemed to me that George Lindsey, as he was talking to McNear, moved to the other side of the barber chair so McNear could read the prompts more easily as they were talking. I'm not sure if that's true or not; it was just an impression. It was very noticeable that someone else was driving Floyd's car when he drove away from the filling station. This episodes is always very sad for me to watch. Floyd seems to be out of character a bit when he immediately cries, "Fraud! I charge fraud." The character was so easygoing in the early episodes, and while he could get angry sometimes, he seemed a little too easily angered against Goober in this episode. Knowing it was his last episode always made this one hard for me to watch.

>

>Rob Reiner was in that episode as one of the printers (and Jack Nicholson was in two episodes, I believe--the abandoned baby episode and the episode with Aunt Bee as juror). The man who had previously run the clothing shop where Opie got his suit was now running the print shop. I believe he was called Mr. Jason in one of the episodes in which he was running the men's clothing store.

 

 

>C. Bogle wrote:

>The Darlings and Ernest T. Bass were okay, but they were never particular favorites of mine. I did like the episode where Goober lowers the owl from the tree onto the Darlings car and they never make the connection. I don't think Malcom Merriweather was ever considered as a regular, and he wasn't as out there as the Darling or Ernest T., and he was a nice guy, but like those charcters, a little of Malcolm went a long way.

 

The only thing I ever thought really funny was when Barney was trying to stop Ernest T. Bass from breaking the new window for the courthouse, but ended up breaking it with his own gun instead. As usual, Andy had to take Barney's gun away, although this time it was not for having accidentally fired it.

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I don't know if that was Floyd's last appearance or not. I did notice the close-ups, which make Floyd appear even angrier and out of sorts. He did seem to have a nice suntan though.

 

From my earlier post:

 

>voranis wrote:

>His face was very stiff and his speech very slurred in "Goober's Contest." At one point it seemed to me that George Lindsey, as he was talking to McNear, moved to the other side of the barber chair so McNear could read the prompts more easily as they were talking. I'm not sure if that's true or not; it was just an impression. It was very noticeable that someone else was driving Floyd's car when he drove away from the filling station. This episodes is always very sad for me to watch. Floyd seems to be out of character a bit when he immediately cries, "Fraud! I charge fraud." The character was so easygoing in the early episodes, and while he could get angry sometimes, he seemed a little too easily angered against Goober in this episode. *Knowing it was his last episode always made this one hard for me to watch.*

 

Robbie

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That would have given Mabel a real super duper migraine headache. Would have

made joining the lodge seem like a good idea.

 

I haven't seen The Conversation in a long time, so I had to think for a minute before

I could place her. If I remember correctly, Jack Dodson had a small role in The Getaway.

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I bet I spent an hour reading this thread this morning.

 

A few things I wanted to comment on:

 

Warren Beatty played Milton Armitage on The Many Love of Dobie Gillis. Chatsworth P Osborn Jr was played by Steve Franken. I was not aware that Doris Packer played Mrs. Armitage as well as Mrs. Osborne (checked the credits & she's only credited with the Osborne part.) Remember her saying "What a nasty boy" or something to that effect. I loved that show as a kid. ETA: Checked again--She was Clarice Armitage in the 1st 2 seasons & then Clarice Osborne in the rest of the series. Was she supposed to be the same person who remarried or a different character altogether. I mainly remember her as Chatsworth's mom.

 

The Andy Griffith show has been on one of the local stations in my town ever since it was in syndication. It has moved from the CBS affiliate to the MY TV affiliate but it's still on the air every day. They even took the color out of the seasons that were in color because I guess some people preferred it that way, which I thought was weird.

 

Was Mabel Albertson ever a nice person in anything? I don't remember it if she was.

 

Jack Dodson was in an episode of Matlock as well--it was an episode where his son is in a cult & Jack's character is charged with the cult leader's murder. Don Knotts spent a season or two on the show as Matlock's neighbor.

 

Edited by: helenbaby on Jul 19, 2011 4:49 PM

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>helenbaby wrote:

>Warren Beatty played Milton Armitage on The Many Love of Dobie Gillis. Chatsworth P Osborn Jr was played by Steve Franken. I was not aware that Doris Packer played Mrs. Armitage as well as Mrs. Osborne (checked the credits & she's only credited with the Osborne part.) Remember her saying "What a nasty boy" or something to that effect. I loved that show as a kid. ETA: Checked again--She was Clarice Armitage in the 1st 2 seasons & then Clarice Osborne in the rest of the series. Was she supposed to be the same person who remarried or a different character altogether. I mainly remember her as Chatsworth's mom.

 

I think they were different characters. She was Milton's mother and then Chatsworth's mother when Chatsworth's character replaced Milton as Dobie's nemesis when Warren Beatty left. I remember the guy who plays Chatsworth Osborne (if I haven't gotten him mixed up with someone else--I haven't been watching Dobie long) playing the man who is checking out the Stephens' house on Bewitched when they wanted to add a gazebo and he is looking for a reason to turn down their loan request and he sees a pink elephant that Clara conjured up. In an earlier episode he worked for one of Darren's clients and hired nasty detective Charlie Leach to investigate the Stephens. He seemed to always be playing "difficult" characters like Mabel Albertson did. He also played Juke who was supposed to marry Samantha--his mother Carlotta was played by the great actress Mercedes McCambridge. He also played a warlock who was turned into the Loch Ness Monster by Serena. He was in quite a few Bewitched episodes.

 

I'm also enjoying, after getting to see them together on The Patty Duke Show, which I just started watching last year on THIS TV, seeing William Schallert and Jean Byron on Dobie Gillis, which I just started watching a few months ago on MeTV. Eddie Applegate was in an episode recently, so at least three regulars from Patty Duke appeared together earlier on Dobie Gillis. I'm really loving these classic TV digital subchannels!

 

>The Andy Griffith show has been on one of the local stations in my town ever since it was in syndication. It has moved from the CBS affiliate to the MY TV affiliate but it's still on the air every day. They even took the color out of the seasons that were in color because I guess some people preferred it that way, which I thought was weird.

 

That is interesting. I wish we could get it every day on something. We don't get MY TV, just THIS and MeTV. TV Land has relegated it to the weekends at a time when I rarely can see it. I miss having it on weekday afternoons.

 

>Was Mabel Albertson ever a nice person in anything? I don't remember it if she was.

 

She played a mother who was tough but not vicious in one of the B&W episodes of Gunsmoke.

 

>Jack Dodson was in an episode of Matlock as well--it was an episode where his son is in a cult & Jack's character is charged with the cult leader's murder. Don Knotts spent a season or two on the show as Matlock's neighbor.

 

I'd seen them both on Matlock but had forgotten about them! Don Knotts disappeared after a while, the way Matlock's partners kept changing. Andy Griffith really tried to bring a lot of his friends into the show.

 

Robbie

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