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Mabel Albertson


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>markbeckuaf wrote:

>I'm the opposite of you with regard to Cannon and Streets. I don't really like either one of them, but one of the fringe benefits of the changes is that Perry Mason is on twice per day and the day time Mason is from the later seasons which I've never seen, so that is radical!!!

 

Mark,

 

MeTV has been showing Perry Mason twice a day, both at 10 a.m. at again at night, since we got it in April of this year. At least, that's the way it's been in our area, because the 10 a.m. showing is the one I've been recording and watching since April. Maybe it's different in different areas, but the MeTV main web site schedule on April 1 had Perry Mason on it. I've included the April 1 lineup below. The 10 a.m. Perry Mason episode on April 1 was "The Caretaker's Cat." I've been saving all the schedules locally since we got the channel in April.

 

Actually, we're not exact opposites when it comes to Cannon and The Streets of San Francisco. I only like The Streets of San Francisco, not Cannon. It must be because of Karl Malden; I really like him in all his film roles.

 

>I've never been tired of The Honeymooners, I could see them all the time, and they showed a lot of the "lost" ones so I'd love to see them back on soon.

 

I guess we're the opposite on this too. :-) I wasn't watching it even when it was on.

 

>I totally dig Fantasy Saturdays, wow! I totally love the remastered Star Trek, wow, the one last night was so good, it was wild!!! I love it! And I'm digging on Lost in Space too!

 

I didn't like Lost in Space or the remastered Star Trek, which also had too many scenes cut for commercials to my liking. But I'm a purist when it comes to Star Trek, one of my favorfit shows. I did enjoy Batman and Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, and Svengoolie had The Incredible Shrinking Man, which I enjoyed as well. I agree with you that his movies are a lot better than Elvira's were.

 

Sunday Noir Night was much better for me!

 

I'll be grooving to two sci-fi/horror classic picks by John Carpenter tonight, especially It! The Terror from Beyond Space, which reportedly was the inspiration for Alien. This movie aired too late at night during the Summer Drive-in series to get any commentary, so I'm looking forward to getting some tonight! And I know TCM will air versions of these movies that do not have any special effects replaced with CGI graphics, as has been done to the version of the original Star Trek airing on MeTV.

 

Robbie

 

# Schedule for **April 1, 2011**Select date:

 

All times in Eastern / Pacific

 

# **5:00 am** Marshal Dillon Cherry Red

# **5:30 am** Marshal Dillon Friends Payoff

# **6:30 am** Gomer Pyle SAVE A LIFE

# **7:00 am** The Beverly Hillbillies THE FLYING SAUCER

# **7:30 am** The Beverly Hillbillies THE MAYOR OF BUG TUSSLE

# **8:00 am** Petticoat Junction KATE'S BIRTHDAY

# **8:30 am** My Three Sons TRAMP OR ERNIE

# **9:00 am** I Love Lucy The Audition Show

# **9:30 am** I Love Lucy The S√?ance

# **10:00 am** Perry Mason The Caretaker's Cat

# **11:00 am** Cannon THE MAN WHO COULDN'T FORGET

# **12:00 pm** Streets of San Francisco Tower Beyond Tragedy

# **1:00 pm** Gunsmoke The Devil's Outpost

# **2:00 pm** Bonanza My Friend, My Enemy

# **3:00 pm** The Big Valley They Called Her Delilah

# **4:00 pm** Rawhide BLACK SHEEP

# **5:00 pm** Hawaii Five-O While You're At It, Bring In The Moon

# **6:00 pm** Hogan's Heroes The dropouts

# **6:30 pm** Hogan's Heroes Easy Come, Easy Go

# **7:00 pm** M*A*S*H Depressing News

# **7:30 pm** M*A*S*H Operation Friendship

# **8:00 pm** The Mary Tyler Moore Show Support You Local Mother

# **8:30 pm** Dick Van Dyke Body and Sol

# **9:00 pm** The Bob Newhart Show A Pound of Flesh

# **9:30 pm** Cheers TEACHERS PET

# **10:00 pm** M*A*S*H Dear Peggy

# **10:30 pm** The Honeymooners Mind Your Own Business

# **11:00 pm** The Twilight Zone THE JUNGLE

# **11:30 pm** Perry Mason The Illicit Illusion

# **12:00 am** Perry Mason The Illicit Illusion

# **12:30 am** The Untouchables The Nick Moses Story

# **1:30 am** Marshal Dillon The Blacksmith

# **2:00 am** 12 O' Clock High Graveyard

# **3:00 am** Combat! FLY AWAY HOME

# **4:00 am** Rawhide INCIDENT OF THE CALICO GUN

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I catch Bonanza a few times a week. I've seen most of the episodes that TV Land shows.

 

You know, it wouldn't be hard to catch Bonanza right now on TV Land. I didn't realize this because I haven't been watching TV Land as much since we got MeTV, but I guess since they dropped Gunsmoke in September, they filled those slots with two more episodes of Bonanza. Right now, until the schedule changes next week, TV Land is showing SIX hours of Bonanza every weekday--from noon to 6 p.m. EDT. That's a LOT of Bonanza !

 

Robbie

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I have just started getting into these discussions, so if I repeat what others have said earlier I apogize. First of all, isn't Mabel Albertson the actress who played Samantha's mother-in-law in Bewitched?

Also, I am thrilled that Andy Griffith is coming back on TV Land. I started watching TV Land in 1993.

They used to have "Life With Elizabeth" with a very young Betty White, Mr. Peepers, and all kinds of other early TV shows. Now the shows are too recent for me. I am delighted to see Dick Van Dyke - hopefully we will see more shows like that.

I live south of Nashville,TN and have Directv. There are no Perry Mason reruns - would love to see those.

Since this is TCM, I don't think I have ever seen Mabel Albertson in any movies. Set me straight, please!

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>bagladymini wrote:

>I have just started getting into these discussions, so if I repeat what others have said earlier I apogize. First of all, isn't Mabel Albertson the actress who played Samantha's mother-in-law in Bewitched?

 

No problem, the thread is getting too long to keep up with everything that has gone before. Absolutely, Mabel played Darren's mother on Bewitched. "Frank, I'm getting another one of my sick headaches."

 

>lso, I am thrilled that Andy Griffith is coming back on TV Land. I started watching TV Land in 1993.

 

Me, too.

 

>They used to have "Life With Elizabeth" with a very young Betty White, Mr. Peepers, and all kinds of other early TV shows. Now the shows are too recent for me. I am delighted to see Dick Van Dyke - hopefully we will see more shows like that.

 

Me, too. I have Life with Elizabeth on DVD, but I must have missed it when it was on Nick at Nite and/or TV Land.

 

>I live south of Nashville,TN and have Directv. There are no Perry Mason reruns - would love to see those.

 

Perry Mason is airing on MeTV which is not carried by DirecTV, unfortunately. MeTV airs a lot of classic TV. They offered to let DirecTV carry their sister station, MeToo (which also showed classic TV at the time) for free, but DirecTV declined. I still don't know why, unless there were some hidden costs that we didn't hear about.

 

>Since this is TCM, I don't think I have ever seen Mabel Albertson in any movies. Set me straight, please!

 

I have seen her in some films on TCM but as I am not as well versed in film as others in these forums, I will let someone else field this one!

 

Robbie

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Also, Boomerang (DirecTV channel 298) has typically been devoted exclusively to cartoons--especially Hanna-Barbera cartoons, which I love. But this week they started showing two live-action classic sitcoms, The Munsters and The Addams Family. The Munsters airs twice a day, at 2 p.m. EDT and at 7 p.m. EDT. The Addams Family airs at 7:30 p.m. EDT.

 

Short of premium channels like Encore Westerns which airs shows like Gunsmoke, Boomerang is about as close as we can get in the lower tier on DirecTV to watching old TV shows uncut--that is, relatively little or no cuts of scenes out of the show to make room for more commercials. (Uncut and commercial-free are two different things.) They still have commercial breaks, but it is just to promote other shows on Boomerang and Cartoon Network. Even MeTV and Antenna TV have edits in the shows they air to make room for more commercials in syndication.

 

Robbie

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Robbie, I do believe Me-TV is slightly different in different areas in terms of programming. Before their recent updates to their programs a week or so ago, the 10am EST slot was filled by The Munsters and The Addams Family. Wow, I didn't know Perry Mason was airing twice per day all that time! I like those other two shows, but I've seen them a zillion times and they only have 2 seasons of shows to air all told. In any case, I'm totally grooving to Perry Mason x2 each weekday!

 

Glad to hear you grooved to some of the Fantastic Saturday night, and to the Sunday Noir! I caught most of both, and they were very groovy! I loved ST (I agree with you about the cuts, but it was still nice to see it, in very nice quality, and I love the first season best, especially the first half of the first season, my ultimate favorite, so that was totally rad!). And I loved watching Lost in Space after a long hiatus! I'm not sure I can make it through Batman with total focus, it's just a bit too silly for me these days, but I still will try it again!

 

Nice complement to TCM, which I used to pretty much have locked in before I got these digital sub-channels! Thankfully I have a DVR so I can satisfy both my classic movie and classic tv show yearnings!

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>markbeckuaf wrote:

>Robbie, I do believe Me-TV is slightly different in different areas in terms of programming. Before their recent updates to their programs a week or so ago, the 10am EST slot was filled by The Munsters and The Addams Family. Wow, I didn't know Perry Mason was airing twice per day all that time! I like those other two shows, but I've seen them a zillion times and they only have 2 seasons of shows to air all told. In any case, I'm totally grooving to Perry Mason x2 each weekday!

 

Mark,

 

That's wild! When the MeTV schedule appears on screen during commercial breaks, there is a disclaimer saying "on most MeTV stations." So I thought there was a chance there might be some variations in some areas. But the main MeTV schedule all this time has had Perry Mason on it at 10 a.m., so if something else was shown in that time slot in some areas, that was the exception rather than the rule. Our local MeTV affiliate has been 100% consistent with the schedule on MeTV's web site since we got the channel in April, except when there were local baseball games on.

 

I can't say the same for our local THIS station which has more variations from the standard THIS schedule. Even the customized THIS web page for our area (.this.com) is not always consistent with what is shown, as we have some local programming that preempts some THIS programs--but thankfully, never Highway Patrol. In fact, we often get extra episodes of Highway Patrol ! One difference on our local THIS station is that Patty Duke and Mister Ed are shown twice a day, both from 6 to 7 a.m. EDT and again from 6 to 7 p.m. EDT. Because this preempts the THIS movie that would be shown in the later afternoon time slot, we sometimes get an extra Highway Patrol at 5:30 p.m. in the afternoon to pad things out. We also get extra episodes of Highway Patrol at other times during the day to pad when a THIS program or movie has been preempted.

 

It's interesting that the two shows that were being shown instead of Perry Mason at 10 a.m. in your area -- The Munsters and The Addams Family -- are now being shown on Boomerang from 7 to 8 p.m. EDT. I wonder if there's any connection, such as a transfer of the rights to air those shows from one corporate entity to another.

 

I wondered I never saw any early Perry Mason episodes at 10 a.m. all these months! Thanks for letting me know the early ones are at night. I assumed they would be doing a full rotation in each time slot, but maybe not.

 

>Glad to hear you grooved to some of the Fantastic Saturday night, and to the Sunday Noir! I caught most of both, and they were very groovy! I loved ST (I agree with you about the cuts, but it was still nice to see it, in very nice quality, and I love the first season best, especially the first half of the first season, my ultimate favorite, so that was totally rad!). And I loved watching Lost in Space after a long hiatus! I'm not sure I can make it through Batman with total focus, it's just a bit too silly for me these days, but I still will try it again!

 

Well, at least we agree on liking the early Star Trek episodes the best! :-) I like the first season best, especially the first half, like you said, because the stories were tighter and William Shatner was giving more restrained performances. I still don't like the CGI replacements of the ship and the space shots, just as I prefer not to watch colorized and pan-and-scan movies if the originals are available. I've often wondered if the change in Shatner's performance was due to his increasing star power and thus the director didn't have as much control, allowing Shatner to ham it up as much as he liked. Which just goes to show what a good director can do.

 

Some of my favorite authors start out writing really good, tight fiction. As they become more famous, their writing becomes looser and their stories more rambling and their books longer. I'm guessing as they become more famous, they have more say in the content of their work and the editor has less say. Which just goes to show what a good editor can do. An example is Stephen King whose earlier works I liked a lot but his works in recent years are often muddled and rambling. I'm guessing editors have little control over what a writer who has achieved King's level of fame and popularity can do.

 

That's funny about your take on Batman. I thought Lost in Space was too silly to watch, but for some reason I was OK with Batman. I couldn't make it through all of Lost in Space. I guess we are opposites here too! But that's what makes for so much variety in the world! I liked Lost in Space better in the beginning when it was in B&W and it was more serious, and Dr. Smith was actually a serious menace. Although I understand Jonathan Harris when he said he realized his role would be quite limited if he continued to remain very sinister (I mean, eventually Major West would probably have killed him), so he had to start camping it up for humor, and to not be as serious a threat to the Robinson family. I guess MeTV is not going to show the B&W Lost in Space episodes since you would expect they would start with the first episode they have available.

 

And I think we know by now MeTV is not going to show the "Tim Considine AKA Mike Douglas" episodes of My Three Sons, as they wrapped the morning show on August 25 and it started with Mike's departure ("The First Marriage.") :-(

 

>Nice complement to TCM, which I used to pretty much have locked in before I got these digital sub-channels! Thankfully I have a DVR so I can satisfy both my classic movie and classic tv show yearnings!

 

I have one satellite box that I never use the remote for because it stays on TCM 24/7. :-)

 

Robbie

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That is a whole lot of Bonanza going on. I usually watch one episode

in the late afternoon once or twice a week. I didn't know it was on

for six hours. They have shown episodes with Candy, even where

David Canary is given a picture credit at the beginning of the show.

I don't think they have shown the last few seasons though. I always

laugh when I see Adam with the bottom of his jeans rolled up. Maybe

there was a practical reason for that, but he looks like a ten year old

kid playing Cowboys and Indians.

 

M*A*S*H was on every weeknight from 8 to 9. That would be ten episodes

a week. So with 251 episodes, that would be about 25 weeks, or about

six months. It doesn't seem that it took over from All in the Family that

long ago, but maybe it did. And since it did run on the weekend sometimes,

maybe that added up. It just didn't seem that way when it was on.

 

I'm enjoying Dick Van Dyke more than I thought I would. Probably it's a

combination of just seeing a b & w classic on TV Land, the fact that,

unlike Andy and Beaver, I haven't seen it in a long time, and lastly it's

a little bit of a time capsule from the early and mid 1960s. Where Andy

was set in a small town, and Beaver in the suburbs, Dick is sort of a

big city/suburban show. Looking forward to this weekend's marathon.

 

Episodes from the not new season of Hot in Cleveland were on last night.

Enough already.

 

 

 

 

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Robbie,

 

Thanks for your reply!

 

It's a total bummer that Me-TV is not airing the William Frawley My Three Sons! I have to say those are my favorite, and I don't really watch the later episodes. Ever since I caught those first 5 seasons when Nick at Nite aired them several years ago, I realized those were the funniest, and best, IMHO!!! I totally grooved on "Bub"!! And I thought Mike made a great older son. Funny how they write him out (I think it was an actor issue, but I'm not totally sure?), and then never mention him again!! It's too bad they couldn't have brought him in once in a while during the later seasons.

 

I can totally see how you would think Lost in Space a bit too silly. I may not hang with every episode, but I thought this last week wasn't too bad in that regard. It seems that they started with season 3, not sure if that means they won't air season 1 or not, but I agree, season 1 is my absolute favorite. Dr. Smith was evil wicked, wow! But only for the first few episodes,as he quickly realized what you said, that his character would burn out that way. He gets sillier, mildly at first, as time goes on in that first season, but overall the stories are more serious than later seasons, and more well done, IMHO. I hope they do air them eventually! Maybe they wanted the night to be all color at first, I don't know?

 

I generally don't lke messing around with original productions (colorization for one!!), but I'm ok with the update on the Star Trek's. Not at first, when I first learned of them, but I have to say I'm finding it ok and actually looking forward to seeing some of it! I also love the first half of the first season the best. I'm not sure exactly if there is one reason--what you suggested might be one. I also love the music, very ethereal. I think Gene Roddenberry had the most influence over the stories as he was line producer before Gene **** (who was also pretty good) started about mid-way through. There was more of an ensemble feel to some of the episodes, instead of just focusing on the "big 3", not that that is always bad either though! And the stories were just very intense and intelligent. I can probably think of more reasons, but the first half of the first season is definitely my favorite of all Star Trek series or movie, just an experience that I always treasure, and I'm glad they are starting there!

 

That's very cool that you get some extra Highway Patrol episodes! I think they've been through them all here maybe even twice, but I still like to watch some of the better ones again, and occasionally I see one that I've missed. I love it! I'm also loving The Untouchables, and I'm yet to watch the first episode aired last week, but I'm guessing I'm going to like both Route 66 and The Naked City! I absolutely love The Fugitive (many years ago A&E aired them, and I saw quite a few of them then), and I'm digging watching that now, too!

 

I notice they are up to the 4th season now for the evening Perry Mason slot, and they seem to be in the 7th season for the daytime slot. I am not sure if they will overlap or not? When I first got Me-TV they were in the first season for the evening slot, so they've aired the first 4 seasons so far. I love the early seasons a LOT, but I also broke down and purchased a few of them before we got Me-TV here, so I've seen a lot of them before also (and in pristine unedited condition)! I can't really afford to keep up with their half season releases so I stopped at season 4, and I'm glad I'm getting to see some of the later seasons now!

 

Happy viewing!

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>That is a whole lot of Bonanza going on. I usually watch one episode in the late afternoon once or twice a week. I didn't know it was on for six hours. They have shown episodes with Candy, even where David Canary is given a picture credit at the beginning of the show. I don't think they have shown the last few seasons though. I always laugh when I see Adam with the bottom of his jeans rolled up. Maybe there was a practical reason for that, but he looks like a ten year old kid playing Cowboys and Indians.

 

It's a little too much Bonanza. I just think TV Land is trying to save money by having less variety--they probably pay a flat rate to have the rights to air the show, so once they buy it, they can air it as much as they want for no additional cost, so buying fewer shows and running them in huge blocks saves them money. I remember when they first acquired Roseanne, they were running four-hour blocks of it late at night, and on Thursdays it filled prime time as well, so that TV Land essentially was running 7-8 hours of it on Thursday nights. It was becoming known as the "Roseanne Network" at the time,

 

Speaking of Adam...first, I should put out a disclaimer that Bonanza is not one my favorite TV westerns, because there were too many "humorous" episodes for my taste. I don't even like the "humorous" episodes of some of my favorite westerns like Gunsmoke and The Big Valley. My favorite Bonanza character is Adam, perhaps because he was the most serious of the sons, and there tended not to be so many humorous episodes when he was involved. (Don't ask me why I don't like westerns combined with humor; I can't explain it. I've deliberately never watched Blazing Saddles because I just know I won't like it.) I always think of Adam wearing all black, but I noticed one time when Bonanza wrapped to the beginning on TV Land that Little Joe wore black in the very beginning. At some point that switched and Adam began wearing all black, and Little Joe started wearing a green coat. I've always wondered why the switch was made. Did Pernell Roberts demand to be the "Man in Black" on the show?

 

Maybe the jeans are rolled up to keep them from getting "too black" at the bottom when dealing with the cattle? I don't know anything about ranching. Hey, maybe Adam wanted to wear all black to hide any "stains."

 

>M*A*S*H was on every weeknight from 8 to 9. That would be ten episodes a week. So with 251 episodes, that would be about 25 weeks, or about six months. It doesn't seem that it took over from All in the Family that long ago, but maybe it did. And since it did run on the weekend sometimes, maybe that added up. It just didn't seem that way when it was on.

 

It probably wasn't. Maybe TV Land reset the show to the beginning because the schedule changed. I like the early M*A*S*H best as Henry, Trapper, and Frank were my favorite characters, in that order. I also thought the writing was funnier and the tone less serious in the early episodes. They did some great drama in the later seasons, though.

 

>I'm enjoying Dick Van Dyke more than I thought I would. Probably it's a combination of just seeing a b & w classic on TV Land, the fact that, unlike Andy and Beaver, I haven't seen it in a long time, and lastly it's a little bit of a time capsule from the early and mid 1960s. Where Andy was set in a small town, and Beaver in the suburbs, Dick is sort of a big city/suburban show. Looking forward to this weekend's marathon.

 

Glad you're enjoying it. It's not one of my favorites either, but I'm watching more of it than I thought I would. I like your characterization of the setting--New Rochelle is sort of the suburbs, but being part of the New York City area makes it much more urban than Beaver. Although I got the impression Beaver's hometown of Mayfield wasn't that big either, although certainly larger than Mayberry.

 

It sure did seem like TV Land was moving fast away from classic TV with the dumping of Beaver and Andy, the last two shows that had B&W episodes. With the return of Dick Van Dyke and Andy, maybe they're rethinking that.

 

At one time TV Land used to air The Andy Griffith Show from 8 to 9 p.m. weeknights. I really liked being able to watch it in prime time when I got home from work. It was their highest rated show at the time they yanked it from that that 8 p.m. time slot and started moving it all around their schedule. I don't know what goes through the heads of the people who make these programming decisions.

 

>Episodes from the not new season of Hot in Cleveland were on last night. Enough already.

 

I guess it's a big hit for them, and since it's in-house it's probably cheaper for them to run. I wanted to like the show, since I liked The Golden Girls, and I like some of the cast members, especially Betty White and Valerie Bertinelli, and they have lots of famous guest stars, but the jokes are too cheap for my taste.

 

Robbie

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>markbeckuaf wrote:

>It's a total bummer that Me-TV is not airing the William Frawley My Three Sons! I have to say those are my favorite, and I don't really watch the later episodes. Ever since I caught those first 5 seasons when Nick at Nite aired them several years ago, I realized those were the funniest, and best, IMHO!!! I totally grooved on "Bub"!! And I thought Mike made a great older son. Funny how they write him out (I think it was an actor issue, but I'm not totally sure?), and then never mention him again!! It's too bad they couldn't have brought him in once in a while during the later seasons.

 

Mark,

 

I think the last time the early seasons of My Three Sons aired it was on TV Land. According to Wikipedia it was in the late 90s / early 2000 but I thought it was a little later than that, maybe 2004 or so. I have them all on videotape (recorded from TV Land) here somewhere, with the actual dates. It was much longer ago that the early episodes aired on Nick at Nite. I had seen the Bub episodes when they had run back in the late 80s / early 90s on Nick at Nite, so I knew they were a lot better than the Uncle Charley ones. But it was great to see all five seasons aired uncut on TV Land. TV Land actually ran them over the normal 30-minute blocks to allow them to be aired uncut and yet still show the regular number of commercials. Nowadays, TV Land runs TV shows over the normal time slot just to make room for more commercials, not to air the shows uncut. One character I liked a lot from the early days was Psuds A favorite of mine was Chip's friend Sudsy Pfeiffer. He was always criticizing everyone and even sparred with Bub once at a restaurant, which I really enjoyed. Bub was telling a joke about vaudeville and Sudsy said, "I don't think I get oldentime humor, sir."

 

Yeah, it would have been good if Tim Considine could have returned for Robby and Steve's marriages. There was a failling out between Considine and the show's producer.

 

The early episodes are out on DVD but the music within the episode has been replaced, which is one of the alterations I find "unacceptable."

 

>I can totally see how you would think Lost in Space a bit too silly. I may not hang with every episode, but I thought this last week wasn't too bad in that regard. It seems that they started with season 3, not sure if that means they won't air season 1 or not, but I agree, season 1 is my absolute favorite. Dr. Smith was evil wicked, wow! But only for the first few episodes,as he quickly realized what you said, that his character would burn out that way. He gets sillier, mildly at first, as time goes on in that first season, but overall the stories are more serious than later seasons, and more well done, IMHO. I hope they do air them eventually! Maybe they wanted the night to be all color at first, I don't know?

 

Of course I loved the Lost in Space episode that aired tonight on MeTV! Part 1 of the pilot. I have it on DVD anyway but it's nice to see it again. It's amazing how Dr. Smith seems so competent with disabling the guard and reprogramming the robot, but cannot operate the transmitter to call home base. And this same Dr. Smith in later seasons would never be able to disable someone with a Captain Kirk-style "karate chop." By the way--Smith disabled the guard over an hour before liftoff. No one noticed the guard was missing, or that he failed to report? What happened to him? If the guard came to before liftoff, he would have reported the incident. If he didn't come to before liftoff, then he's still on the ship and no one at home base noticed he didn't leave the ship or report?

 

I love the laser gun Smith uses to break open West's tube.

 

I notice the pilot was written by S. Bar David. I just saw a Gunsmoke episode on Encore Westerns two nights ago written by S. Bar-David (as Shimon Bar-David) called "Homecoming." Strangely, that particular episode of Gunsmoke is not listed in his credits on IMDB, perhaps because it was Shimon Bar-David instead of as S Bar-David (but IMDB does list three other episodes for him). I recognized the name when watching Gunsmoke the other night because he also wrote several episodes of the original Star Trek, including one I really like, "Dagger of the Mind."

 

>I generally don't lke messing around with original productions (colorization for one!!), but I'm ok with the update on the Star Trek's. Not at first, when I first learned of them, but I have to say I'm finding it ok and actually looking forward to seeing some of it!

 

Once again, we are opposites. :-) I thought the updates might be OK when I first heard about them, but discovered I disliked them when I actually saw them several years ago in syndication. I dislike colorization too--when Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie were released on DVD, I bought the B&W versions of the early seasons rather than the colorized ones. But I find this worse. Not only is the color changed, but the shape of some of the effects are changed, such as the "edge of the galaxy" in "Where No Man Has Gone Before." And the theme music has been redone. It's very close to the original, but there are some minute differences. All this adds up to the impression that this is not the Star Trek+ I grew up watching. Add to that the cuts for syndication, and I'd rather not waste my time watching them on MeTV when I can pull out the DVDs of the unaltered version (thank goodness I bought those before the remastered DVDs came out) and watch them in the original form.

 

>I also love the first half of the first season the best. I'm not sure exactly if there is one reason--what you suggested might be one. I also love the music, very ethereal. I think Gene Roddenberry had the most influence over the stories as he was line producer before Gene **** (who was also pretty good) started about mid-way through. There was more of an ensemble feel to some of the episodes, instead of just focusing on the "big 3", not that that is always bad either though! And the stories were just very intense and intelligent. I can probably think of more reasons, but the first half of the first season is definitely my favorite of all Star Trek series or movie, just an experience that I always treasure, and I'm glad they are starting there!

 

Gene **** was a pretty good producer in addition to Roddenberry. For some reason the network thought it was best to focus on Kirk, Spock, and McCoy, but I agree with you that the ensemble cast was better. We got to see Uhura singing and Sulu's interests in botany and fencing. I liked some of the other minor characters like Lt. Lee Kelso, played by Paul Carr--too bad Gary Mitchell killed him off in the pilot. If only Kirk had kept his big mouth shut about Kelso manning the destruct switch instead of blabbing about it right in front of Mitchell. I also liked Lt. Kevin Riley, who had speaking parts in two episodes but also appeared as navigator with no speaking part in one other episode (can't remember which one right now). Navigators Bailey, Farrell, and Stiles also added some depth. We got to see the rec room used more! We got to see the gym in "Charlie X," and we got to hear about how they celebrate Thanksgiving on the ship. Or at least, how they were supposed to before Charlie took over. Yeoman Rand added a lot, too! There was a rich supporting cast. In fact, I was often more interested in the supporting cast. Lt. DeSalle was navigator sometimes. Mr. Kyle was transporter chief. In fact, there are some Star Trek books that are primarily about the supporting characters, although I have not read them.

 

Also in the early episodes, Kirk was going to be an "aloof" captain like Christopher Pike (in "The Enemy Within" Spock says the captain cannot appear vulnerable at all to the crew, he must remain above the crew). He didn't seem like he was going to be a womanizer--he was shocked when he found Eve in his quarters in "Mudd's Women," and when she said she hoped he didn't mind, he said, "As a matter of fact, Miss McHuron, I do." I think in "The Naked Time" Kirk says about Yeoman Rand, "You're allowed to notice her. The captain's not allowed to notice." I wish they had kept him that way instead of dumping Rand so Kirk could womanize all over the place. I'm not sure the act of dumping Rand really freed up Kirk anyway because she wasn't getting anywhere with him. There are conflicting stories about why she was released; some reports say she was let go because of substance abuse, while other reports say she began heavily abusing because she was let go.

 

The music of Alexander Courage was very good, too. His music had a way of creating tension very appropriate to the scene, and then releasing it. I'm not sure if this was done by switching from a minor or diminished key to a major key or what. An example (not sure if it was Courage's or not, but I think it was) was the controlled implosion near the end of "The Naked Time"; the tension in the music mirrors the tension as they are experiencing the time warp, and the music "releases" right as the main bridge lights come back on and everything is "OK." The music similarly creates tension when it looks like the Romulans are about to destroy the Enterprise when Commodore Stocker is in command near the end of "The Deadly Years," and then the music "releases" right as the turbo elevator doors open and the rejuvenated Kirk practically vaults onto the bridge to save the day.

 

I may not know much about movies, but Star Trek is something I know quite a bit about. I can practically quote some episodes verbatim.

 

>>That's very cool that you get some extra Highway Patrol episodes! I think they've been through them all here maybe even twice, but I still like to watch some of the better ones again, and occasionally I see one that I've missed. I love it! I'm also loving The Untouchables, and I'm yet to watch the first episode aired last week, but I'm guessing I'm going to like both Route 66 and The Naked City! I absolutely love The Fugitive (many years ago A&E aired them, and I saw quite a few of them then), and I'm digging watching that now, too!

 

Did they air The Untouchables pilot last week? I had to return my DVD as it was not playable, so I didn't get to finish watching the two-hour pilot. Sorry I missed it on MeTV. I have been waiting for the show to wrap so I could watch the episodes in order, but I guess I missed it.

 

>I notice they are up to the 4th season now for the evening Perry Mason slot, and they seem to be in the 7th season for the daytime slot. I am not sure if they will overlap or not? When I first got Me-TV they were in the first season for the evening slot, so they've aired the first 4 seasons so far. I love the early seasons a LOT, but I also broke down and purchased a few of them before we got Me-TV here, so I've seen a lot of them before also (and in pristine unedited condition)! I can't really afford to keep up with their half season releases so I stopped at season 4, and I'm glad I'm getting to see some of the later seasons now!

 

I wish they would release the shows in season sets, not in half sets.

 

Happy viewing!

 

Robbie

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TV Land is airing one of the "Stacey Petrie" episodes of The Dick Van Dyke Show right now. Jerry Van Dyke appeared as a banjo player on The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Andy Griffith Show ("Banjo-Playing Deputy") and Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. The Dick Van Dyke Show was produced in association with Danny Thomas; The Andy Griffith Show was launched from an episode of The Danny Thomas Show, and Gomer Pyle was a spinoff of The Andy Grffith Show, so the shows had something in common. I wonder if Jerry Van Dyke was an "in-house" player.

 

In the episode on TV Land right now, Stacey is a sleepwalker. This reminds me of the episode of The Andy Griffith Show in which Warren was a sleepwalker. I wonder if they recycled this plot from The Dick Van Dyke Show.

 

In "Banjo-Playing Deputy" on The Andy Griffith Show, Barney did not appear. Since it was the last episode of the last season in which Don Knotts was a regular, I often wondered if they were toying with the idea of having Jerry Van Dyke's character replace Barney. Since it was only one episode, I eventually decided it must have been a fluke. But I just read on Wikipedia that Van Dyke was indeed offered the role to replace Barney, but he turned it down.

 

They sure did recycle character actors on these shows! In an episode of Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. titled "The Case of the Marine Bandit," Ellen Corby appears as the head of a crooked mother-daughter team tricking Marines into holding up liquor stores. Carter and Gomer get involved when the daughter pretends that her car is broken down on the road. Corby appeared as the head of a gang in the episode of The Andy Griffith Show titled "Barney's First Car."

 

But the reuse of actors goes further! At the end of "Barney's First Car," another little old lady shows up at the end to sell her car and Barney is more suspicious the second time around. At the end of "The Case of the Marine Bandit," Carter and Gomer find another car broken down on the road, and the driver is no less than the second little old lady from "Barney's First Car"! They sure weren't subtle in reusing plots and actors, such as when Allan Melvin appears as a bully who is bluffed by martial arts in TWO episodes of The Andy Griffith Show, one with Barney and one with Howard!

 

Speaking of Allan Melvin, he seemed to be another "in-house" character actor: Rob's old Army buddy on The Dick Van Dyke Show, many guest appearances (usually, but not always, baddies) on The Andy Griffith Show, and Sergeant Hacker on Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

 

It sure is good to be watching classic TV on TV Land again!

 

Robbie

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Six hours of Bonanza is a bit much, but maybe, as you say, TVL

saves money that way. I don't mind the humorous episodes that

much, because a lot of the straight drama episodes are pretty

cliched. There were only so many Western stories that could be

told, so to me the humorous ones were a bit of a break.

 

 

 

Well, Adam was the one with the book learnin', maybe that's why he

was usually the most serious. I don't think it was ever revealed what

college he went to, it was just somewhere back east. I believe he

says he studied architecture or engineering. Of course you don't see

the rolled up jeans in every episode, but I always notice it when they

do. Still looks kind of funny.

 

 

 

I think that TVL showed Beaver and Andy back to back in prime time

maybe eight or nine years ago or more. That was great. I wish they

would get back to the classics, but it looks like they're already running

promos for new in house shows, so that doesn't seem likely.

 

 

 

I don't think viewers ever saw as much of downtown Mayfield as they

did of Mayberry, but it seemed to be a bigger town than Mayberry.

 

All that recycling of actors seems a win-win situation. The actors have

relatively steady employment and the shows have known quantities to

be in the shows. I watched some of the marathon over the weekend,

including the ones with Jerry Van Dyke. I know it's only a TV show, but

it was a little hard to believe that a comic "genius" like Alan Brady would

have Stacey's act on his show. There wasn't much to it. My pet peeve

is that the weekend marathon was already repeating shows from the

weekday marathon.

 

I noticed that the large vertical oval window seen in the old version of

the writing staff's office in The Dick Van Dyke Show looks very much like

the one seen in The Andy Griffith Show, where it showed up in Helen's

classroom and a few other places. Maybe they were recycling more than

the actors.

 

 

 

 

 

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Well, Adam was the one with the book learnin', maybe that's why he was usually the most serious. I don't think it was ever revealed what college he went to, it was just somewhere back east. I believe he says he studied architecture or engineering. Of course you don't see the rolled up jeans in every episode, but I always notice it when they do. Still looks kind of funny.

 

I had forgotten Adam was schooled back east. Thanks for reminding me about that!

 

>I think that TVL showed Beaver and Andy back to back in prime time maybe eight or nine years ago or more. That was great. I wish they would get back to the classics, but it looks like they're already running promos for new in house shows, so that doesn't seem likely.

 

Yeah, that was a great lineup. I remember they had Andy on from 8 to 9 p.m. and again from 11 p.m. to midnight, or maybe it was midnight to 1 a.m. I hate that the only time I can see it now is on weekend afternoons when I'm often busy with something else.

 

Yeah, TV Land is creating more new "in-house" shows; looks like they're trying to save money. I wonder if the costs involved with producing an in-house show is still cheaper than leasing a classic TV show. TV Land is moving away from classics anyway, but bringing back The Dick Van Dyke Show is a nice "one step back."

 

>I don't think viewers ever saw as much of downtown Mayfield as they did of Mayberry, but it seemed to be a bigger town than Mayberry.

 

No question, as I said previously, that it was bigger than Mayberry. There are quite a few episodes where Wally and Beaver, or Beaver and Larry, or Beaver and Gilbert, are downtown, and there's one where Ward went downtown to get something at the drugstore. But I don't think Mayfield was a very big town, either. At least, that was my impression.

 

>All that recycling of actors seems a win-win situation. The actors have relatively steady employment and the shows have known quantities to be in the shows. I watched some of the marathon over the weekend, including the ones with Jerry Van Dyke. I know it's only a TV show, but it was a little hard to believe that a comic "genius" like Alan Brady would have Stacey's act on his show. There wasn't much to it. My pet peeve is that the weekend marathon was already repeating shows from the weekday marathon.

 

A friend of mine also wondered why they were running the same shows from the week. I believe it was to give viewers a chance to see these "best-of" episodes who didn't get to seem them during the week--perhaps because they had to work late, or whatever. I think it was one of TV Land's better ideas, and they don't have that many good ideas. I know I caught quite a few episodes that I wasn't able to watch during the week. Besides, the series was starting a regular run this week.

 

>I noticed that the large vertical oval window seen in the old version of the writing staff's office in The Dick Van Dyke Show looks very much like the one seen in The Andy Griffith Show, where it showed up in Helen's classroom and a few other places. Maybe they were recycling more than the actors.

 

Could be! I've noticed the window in Helen's classroom, but I haven't paid much attention to the window in the writers' office. I'll have to watch for that. I love how Jamie Farr plays the guy bringing the coffee and pastry around. I've worked in four or five companies that had huge buildings but the days of the "pastry cart" were well over by the time I started working. All we got was a vending machine. I think it would be neat to be able to get fresh pastries right there in the office. Those were the days!

 

Robbie

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>I think that TVL showed Beaver and Andy back to back in prime time maybe eight or nine years ago or more. That was great. I wish they would get back to the classics, but it looks like they're already running promos for new in house shows, so that doesn't seem likely.

 

I notice they are now running M*A*S*H from 5 to 7 p.m. weekday afternoons. Bonanza is now two hours in the morning (8 to 10 a.m.) and three hours in the afternoon. Still way too much Bonanza, IMO, but as we've discussed, they're probably trying to save money.

 

The episode of M*A*S*H with Arlene Golonka as Nurse Edwina was on at 5 p.m. EDT today.

 

Wouldn't a great evening lineup for primetime be M*A*S*H, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Leave It to Beaver, and The Andy Griffth Show ?

 

The promo for their new show The Exes looks absolutely HORRIBLE. It looks way worse than their other in-house shows, and that's saying a LOT.

 

>I don't think viewers ever saw as much of downtown Mayfield as they did of Mayberry, but it seemed to be a bigger town than Mayberry.

 

My point about Mayfield being a small town is that it may have been too small to technically have had "suburbs." I haven't seen anything in Mayfield that we didn't have in the town in which I grew up, and my hometown had a population of about 8,000 people, which is still relatively small. Too small to have suburbs. We had neighborhoods within the town just like the Cleavers', and they weren't considered suburbs.

 

Robbie

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There were a few episodes where visitors from the east would make

comments about how uncivilized the west was, and Adam would stick

up for his native region, while also seeing the easterners' point of view.

 

 

 

I thought that Andy and Beaver were on back to back at one time, fairly

long ago. That was great. I can't watch Dick Van Dyke at 7, but I'm happy

to see it's also on at 7:30, when I can watch it. That will make for a nice

relaxed schedule, one episode a night. The long gone pastry cart is one of

those time capsule things that one notices in a show that is now fifty years

old. Vending machines just aren't the same.

 

 

 

Mayberry was so small that you got the feeling you had seen all of it. Mayfield

was larger, and I mostly got a sense of individual stores and never of the whole

town. I also guess there was some debate about exactly where it was located.

I can't remember that it ever got very cold there or there was ever a snowstorm.

Perhaps Mayfield was not technically a suburb, though there could have been a

big city nearby, but to me it felt more like a suburban show than a small town

show, though there are some elements of that too.

 

I shouldn't rag on TVL's new programs. I've never seen an episode of Hot in Cleveland,

but I think an experienced boob tube watcher can pretty much guess what it's about.

It seems like Valerie Bertinelli must have been in about half a dozen TV shows that

didn't have much success before this one. I have caught a few episodes of Retired

at 35. Not bad, but nothing very new or funny.

 

It would be great to have a prime time line up of classic shows, but I doubt that will

ever happen again on TVL. It is good to have Dick Van Dyke on, even if it's not in

prime time. I usually can't catch much in the mornings or afternoons, so I'm glad

that he is on at 7:30.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>The long gone pastry cart is one of those time capsule things that one notices in a show that is now fifty years old. Vending machines just aren't the same.

 

So true.

 

>Mayberry was so small that you got the feeling you had seen all of it.

 

We only see portions of downtown and a few neighborhood streets. You can actually see part of downtown from the yard in front of Andy's house--which begs the question, if it's that close, why does he need Barney to pick him up in the squad car after breakfast to take him to the courthouse for work in some episodes? There are actually shots of some fairly tall buildings downtown, and in a few wide shots of the downtown streets we can see some side streets with non-residential buildings on them, so it's hard to be sure exactly how big downtown is.

 

>Mayfield was larger, and I mostly got a sense of individual stores and never of the whole town.

 

No question that Mayfield was larger--in fact, I originally said so. But as for the rest of it--technically I believe we can say the same thing about Mayberry, given there are references to other neighborhoods and side streets in the downtown area that we never see. So there are stores on the side streets we never see. We only get a sense of individual stores (grocer, barbershop, drugstore, dry cleaner, gas station). Heck, Aunt Bee needed to learn to drive because she got tired of needing rides "across town" to Clara's. Of course, sometimes it looked like Clara walked to the Taylor's, so it's hard to tell whether she really lived nearby or "across town." But certainly there were other residential streets besides the one the Taylors lived on, and we never see them. So we never really see "all" of Mayberry.

 

>I also guess there was some debate about exactly where it was located. I can't remember that it ever got very cold there or there was ever a snowstorm. Perhaps Mayfield was not technically a suburb, though there could have been a big city nearby, but to me it felt more like a suburban show than a small town show, though there are some elements of that too.

 

The most popular theory is that Mayfield is in Ohio, although technically Mayfield is fictional and the producers wanted no state ever defined as its location.

 

I never saw anything in Mayfield that my hometown didn't have also, and my hometown wasn't a suburb. But my hometown was not located near a big city, either. I always thought suburbs were neighborhoods along the outer edges of a city--a city large enough to have a central "urban" area--but that those suburbs were neighborhoods still within the city limits.

 

I didn't know an entire town outside a city, but near it, could be considered a suburb of that city. Does it have anything to do with the fact that residents of the town may commute to the nearby city? In the metropolitan area in which I live, such towns are called bedroom communities, never suburbs. But I did look up "bedroom community" on Wikipedia and it redirected to "commuter town" and it does say: "Many commuter towns act as suburbs of a nearby metropolis that workers travel to daily, and many suburbs are commuter towns."

 

Bewitched was set in Westport, Connecticut, and there was speculation that Darren Stephens commuted from there to New York City. Does that mean Westport is a suburb of New York City? How far can a town be from a city before it cannot be considered a suburb?

 

I got the impression Ward worked in downtown Mayfield. If there is no large city near Mayfield, does that mean it would not be a suburb?

 

All I know is that the downtown of Mayfield looked no bigger than the downtown of my hometown. We had a hospital, schools, accounting firms like the one in which Ward worked, etc. While there were some episodes in which they rode bikes, there were also episodes in which Wally and Beaver or Beaver and Larry walked to and from downtown, which we could also do in my hometown. One time Beaver and Gilbert bought something downtown and were shown walking carrying it back to Beaver's house. There were plenty of streets like the Cleavers' in the hometown in which I lived and no part of that town was ever considered a suburb.

 

>I shouldn't rag on TVL's new programs. I've never seen an episode of Hot in Cleveland, but I think an experienced boob tube watcher can pretty much guess what it's about. It seems like Valerie Bertinelli must have been in about half a dozen TV shows that didn't have much success before this one.

 

I actually think Bertinelli is one of the more likeable aspects of Hot in Cleveland. It's Wendie Malick and Jane Leeves that I find dreadful.

 

I see Christina Applegate is in a new show called Up All Night. She's been in two previous shows that didn't last long. They're running repeats of one of them called Samantha Who? on the TV Guide Network. The networks keep trying to prop her up but the shows keep failing.

 

>I have caught a few episodes of Retired at 35. Not bad, but nothing very new or funny.

 

That was my impression, too.

 

Robbie

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I didn't catch any of The Andy Griffith Show episodes TV Land aired this weekend, but I did see what was in the schedule. Assuming the scene wasn't cut for commercials when it aired this time, did you notice Barney had his own car in the episode with the runaway kid Tex? When he pulls up in front of the Taylor home, he pulls up behind (or in front of) the squad car which is already parked in front of the house. This would be the scene when Barney is reporting the description of the runaway kid to Andy the whole time Tex, who matches the description, is already standing on the porch.

 

Wonder what happened to Barney's car?

 

And I believe in the pilot (if you don't count the episode of The Danny Thomas Show as the pilot) titled "The New Housekeeper," wasn't Andy washing his car when Barney comes up to "report" something to him? I remember Barney talked about being glad Andy hired him on a fair impartial basis. "And I want to thank you, cousin Andy."

 

Wonder what happened to Andy's truck?

 

Robbie

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I think that suburb can mean a small town that is close to a big city,

but not actually within the city limits. Many areas around NYC and

other large cities are called suburbs, as they are connected to those

cities in many ways, though they are not a part of the city. Even some

small towns or cities in Connecticut might be called NYC suburbs, even

though they're not even in the same state. Maybe the word has also

taken on the idea of small cities that seem suburban like. Now that many

of the areas near cities are pretty well built up, people have to live even

farther out in the exurbs.

 

 

I remember one episode where either Ward or Fred looked out the office

window and saw Beaver and/or Wally walking around downtown, I think

at a time they shouldn't have been there. There are a few episodes of

Andy where you notice how close to downtown his yard seems. And it

looked like a dirt road instead of a paved one. Aunt Bee looks like she

could have used a little exercise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I went leap peeping on Sunday, while there were still leaves to peep at,

so I didn't see any of the shows that day. I did check out the DirecTV

on air guide and noticed they seem to be starting at the beginning with

some shows with Ellie. I think the case of the disappearing motor vehicles

is another example of how casual they were back then about continuity

issues. Most people, having seen an episode just once, likely didn't even

think about where those cars went, just like when Barney's blood relation-

ship with Andy disappeared.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I noticed while watching an episode of Dick Van Dyke that the DirecTV on

air description had the title of the episode right, but had the description

of an entirely different episode. Things happen.

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>I think that suburb can mean a small town that is close to a big city, but not actually within the city limits. Many areas around NYC and other large cities are called suburbs, as they are connected to those cities in many ways, though they are not a part of the city. Even some small towns or cities in Connecticut might be called NYC suburbs, even though they're not even in the same state. Maybe the word has also taken on the idea of small cities that seem suburban like. Now that many of the areas near cities are pretty well built up, people have to live even farther out in the exurbs.

 

I was wondering if the "small cities that seem suburban like" definition might apply here. Hypothetically, what if Mayfield is not near any big city? Is it still a suburb?

 

I grew up in a small town, and I'm trying to figure out what would make Mayfield more "suburban" than the town I grew up in, especially if it isn't located near a big city.

 

>I remember one episode where either Ward or Fred looked out the office window and saw Beaver and/or Wally walking around downtown, I think at a time they shouldn't have been there.

 

I remember that episode. That's one of the reasons I think Mayfield may not have been that big a town, if Beaver and Wally/Larry/Gilbert can walk down there and back. It was certainly bigger than Mayberry, of course.

 

>There are a few episodes of Andy where you notice how close to downtown his yard seems. And it looked like a dirt road instead of a paved one. Aunt Bee looks like she could have used a little exercise.

 

You can actually see some downtown buildings from the front yard of Andy's house. I'm glad you mentioned the road sometimes looking unpaved--I had noticed that as well, but wasn't sure I was seeing it clearly. I think some of the downtown roads look unpaved in some episodes as well, but paved in others.

 

>I went leap peeping on Sunday, while there were still leaves to peep at, so I didn't see any of the shows that day. I did check out the DirecTV on air guide and noticed they seem to be starting at the beginning with some shows with Ellie. I think the case of the disappearing motor vehicles is another example of how casual they were back then about continuity issues. Most people, having seen an episode just once, likely didn't even think about where those cars went, just like when Barney's blood relation-ship with Andy disappeared.

 

TV Land started at the very beginning (if you don't count the episode of The Danny Thomas Show ) with "The New Housekeeper" on Saturday. So, they skipped over some episodes from the final season when they "reset" this past weekend. I was sorry they skipped over some final season episodes like the one with Howard's bachelor pad, as I really liked the character of Emmett.

 

>I noticed while watching an episode of Dick Van Dyke that the DirecTV on air description had the title of the episode right, but had the description of an entirely different episode. Things happen.

 

They get out of sync quite a bit.

 

Robbie

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Maybe one of the reasons I think of Beaver as being set in the

suburbs are those wide streets and generous lawns of the

neighborhood of the second house. They just seem so suburban,

though they could be in small town too.

 

 

I don't think there are too many shots looking from Andy's house

up to the town, but I seem to remember that, at least in the b

& w episodes, the street looked unpaved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The episode about Howard's swinging bachelor pad was a funny one,

like most of the episodes where he is featured. Dig those beads and

pillows. Poor Helen thought her feet were done for the evening, and

then Emmett shows up and, with the best of intentions, starts the

dancing all up again.

 

 

 

Dick Van Dyke had a good episode last evening, "One Angry Man."

Dick has to sit on a jury and is distracted by the sexy defendant,

played by Sue Ann Langdon. The guy sitting next to him in the jury

box is the same actor who played the pastry cart guy a few weeks

ago, and the judge is an actor who also played some part in Beaver,

either another judge or a school administrator. So the revolving cast

of actors continues. Even though I hadn't seen Dick Van Dyke in

about ten years before it started up again, I remembered this episode,

it's a funny one.

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> {quote:title=C.Bogle wrote:}{quote}

>

> Dick Van Dyke had a good episode last evening, "One Angry Man."

> Dick has to sit on a jury and is distracted by the sexy defendant,

> played by Sue Ann Langdon. The guy sitting next to him in the jury

> box is the same actor who played the pastry cart guy a few weeks

> ago...

>

That was probably Frank Adamo, CB. He was a semi-regular for bit parts on the old Van Dyke program.

 

In fact, a few years back when they were running the show full-time, TV Land produced a very clever little 15 or 30 second promotion for Van Dyke's show with the theme of something like, "Spot Frank Adamo".

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