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Kyle In Hollywood's CENSORED Ephemera Drawer


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Wow! Lots of legs and I haven't been here to see them! Thanks. The old computer gave out Friday, and I just got hooked up with DSL. Yay! Did you know new computers don't come with dialup modems? :-)

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>I clicked on the images and I don't see what's the matter. In the first shot, she is wearing a big shower curtain, and in the next she is wearing shoes.

 

The only thing I see wrong with the "shower" one is that someone doodled a bit on the right side of it, thereby possibly slightly reducing its value.

No problem with the image!

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The "All Quiet..." theater is identified as being the "Olympia Theater".

 

Future postings of Boston theaters will include "The Metropolitan" and the "Scollay Square".

"Scollay Square" is the theater seen in the *42nd Street* photo posted yesterday.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Jul 14, 2011 11:54 AM

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*"And the text is mounted separately."* - smileys

 

I think that wall-mount with the text is a light box which would illuminate the text from behind.

 

Sounds cool but it isn't as "fun" as the text on the poster -

 

HotSaturday1932

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Well, which is it? Did she try to live up to it, or wouldn't she play the game?

 

Now that I checked in to see the large version to read the first caption, I see that Nancy Carroll appears to be a cardboard cutout. That whole display would look impressive on the living room wall.

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Thanks for the Pogo strip. One of the all time great comic strips ever. I still have about 10 of the Pogo books published. It was a wonderful look at the times it was published....

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*"I wonder if anybody collects those, or if any still exist?"* -smileys

 

I think most ended up on the proverbial trash heap. But I seem to remember seeing a "story" somewhere of some of these types of materials being found by someone in their family home. The large display pieces were used like drywall to create walls to "rooms" in an attic or unfinished third floor of a house. (The art sides were put up facing the studs so that the blank, back sides were facing out and could be painted.) I think the story appeared on a short-lived spin-off of Antiques Roadshow where appraisers came to look at items in someone's house.

 

Some of these pieces went up for sale at an auction and sold for very little. "One-of-a-kind", locally produced art displays like these don't have much value. (But locally produced posters or poster-style artwork are a different story. Those can be valuable.)

 

*"Those cardboard cutouts are just too cool."*

 

Because "cool" is in short supply this week where you are, here's some other interesting (cool?) 1930s lobby displays.

 

!Copy of Display_ManOfWorldBoston

Theater Unknown, Boston

 

Copy of Display_ShadowBoston

Scollay Square Theater, Boston

 

-----------------------------

 

Copy of Display_ScandalSheetBoston01

 

Copy of Display_ScandalSheetBoston02

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Jul 18, 2011 9:53 AM

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Thanks for those. I need cheering up. I drove across the Red River this morning, and it's DRY. In forty years here, I've never seen that happen. Now they're talking about rolling blackouts. :-( :-( :-( Bring on the cool.

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