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misswonderly3

a CANADIAN thread

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Canadians and their actors have never been dull. Canadians aren't the ones who bleep out every "darn" or "damn" with movies shown on tv.

 

Edited by: TheTownTart on Jul 10, 2011 10:38 AM

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No Canadian says "aboot".vvv

 

You got that straight, TownTart. (love your screen name, by the way.)

 

Where did Americans ever get the idea that Canadians say "aboot" ? Nope. we dooont.

 

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What do you call a heavy insulated shoe that you wear in the winter weather?

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They don't. I don't, at any rate. I wear a-boot. Two booots. ( There you go, mrroberts. )

By the way, "flip-flops" used to also be called "thongs", at least in the part of Canada where I come from. Of course the more recent use of the word has discouraged that. Think of the confusion it could cause !

 

On a more film-related note, CasaCinema in an earlier post here mentioned that Raymond Massey was Canadian. He was born, raised, and educated in Toronto, Ontario. His father was owner of the successful farm machinery company "Massey-Fergusen.". His mother was American, and could trace her family back to the Revolutionary War. Maybe that's why they gave the role of Abe Lincoln to Massey. Yes, I know the difference between the American Revolutionary War and the American Civil War. But that noble American lineage....actually, it was more likely due to the shape of his jaw.

 

Other stand-out Raymond Massey films: *The Scarlet Pimpernel, Things to Come, Fire Over England, Prisoner of Zenda* ( earlier version), *Sante Fe Trail,* and, embarrassingly, The Fountainhead - well, actually, I kind of like him and his character in *The Fountainhead.* (Ok, apologies to all those Fountainhead fans out there.)

 

 

Raymond Massey's daughter, Anna Massey, was an English actress ( guess old Ray married a Brit) who appeared in a number of off-beat British movies in the 60s, notably *Peeping Tom, Bunny Lake is Missing,* and Hitchcock's *Frenzy,* in which she played the unfortunate dating service CEO who is in the wrong place at the wrong time.

 

 

However, it would be stretching it indeed to try and claim that she was Canadian, but her dad was. As CasaCinema has mentioned, Anna Massey died just a week or so ago, July 3rd.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 11, 2011 4:20 PM

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"Flip-flops" were long called "thongs" in the US too. But, with the advent of thong bathing suits, the word usage has largely changed. Now, thongs mean the skimpiest of bathing suits.

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The house that I grew up in had a major railroad line (Reading Railroad) running right behind us. So I saw an awful lot of railroad traffic and the many different railroad markings. A lot of CN boxcars, some marked "CanadiAn National" and some marked "CanadiEn National" . I noted the different spellings but it took years before I became aware of the reasons for it. I guess at that time (60's) the company did that on its own, not a mandated requirement.

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*The One That Got Away* 1958 ends up in Canada but things were a bit too cold for the POW. I wonder if he saw the other guy from the *49th Parallel* on the way out?

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}helenbaby wrote:

>

> Actually, I've noticed a lot of Canadians have started saying the more American "huh" instead of "eh"

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I will never give up my "eh", eh? ;)

 

Interesting thread - I am familiar with a lot of the Canadian actors mentioned here and offhand can't think of any more to add. I have to say, though, that as far as Canadian movies are concerned I tend to avoid them like the plague, ever since I saw Goin' Down the Road. I find a lot of them to be dull and/or pretentious. Just not my cup of tea, really - but to each his own, eh?

 

I did see an old movie recently on TCM that took place mostly in Canada; I can't recall the name of it but it starred Errol Flynn and there were Nazis and lots of snow. It was on in the middle of the night, but I got quite interested in it and couldn't stop watching.

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Just reviving this thread to say that I'd recorded *The Magnetic Monster* but didnt' have a chance to watch it til last night ( seen *Pride and Prejudice* many times.)

So much to my delight, the technology that saves the world from the Magnetic Monster is located in Nova Scotia, Canada. They fly the "element" to N.S. with the hope that this Canadian technology ( a massive electricity transformer or something) will destroy the monster.

That in itself was unexpected and fun, but even better, the bad guy of the story (other than the magnetic monster itself of course) turned out to be a Canadian ! (he was the one who tried to stop the electrical force from ...oh, never mind, it's complicated. )

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I deleted my recording of THE MAGNETIC MONSTER and wish I hadn't done so.

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Sad news: film lover and founder/host of TVO's "Saturday Night at the Movies" Elwy Yost died yesterday. He was 86.

Mr. Yost loved old movies, as was very apparent from his enthusiasm while introducing them and also in his interviews with famous classic film stars, directors, etc. "Saturday Night at the Movies" was around looong before Turner Classic Movies - it was kind of a forerunner for the station, although unlike TCM, it was limited to Saturday night.

 

There was something endearing and almost innocent about Elwy Yost and his unabashed passion for classic film. I enjoyed his show very much, and was introduced to many great movies, both famous and obscure, thanks to him.

Here is a link with an article about him:

 

http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/movie-guide/VancouvermoviebuffbroadcasterElwyYostdead/5144785/story.html

 

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 22, 2011 3:26 PM

Almost forgot to mention - anyway, it seems unnecessary - Elwy Yost was Canadian. So was his show.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 22, 2011 9:15 PM

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I recently copied my beta tapes of Elwy's interviews to DVD. They ran his MOVIEMAKERS show on PBS here in the States.

 

Elwy was a professional movie fan and, yes, his enthusiasm was contagious! My father-in-law loved him and I always enjoyed watching his intros and interviews when I visited Ottawa.

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His son is screenwriter, Graham Yost. In addition to his big screen writing credits, Graham Yost is the executive producer of *Justified*, *Falling Skies*, *The Pacific* and *From the Earth to the Moon*.

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No, we don't say "a-boat" either. We say the word pretty much the same way most Americans say it.

 

Accents tend to be regional rather than national anyway.

 

Right now I'd rather talk about Elwy Yost, a true movie lover and someone who shared many great and rare films with his audience. BTW, I never noticed any kind of accent with him.

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"Accents tend to be regional"; as a American (Pennsylvania Dutch country) when I travel I notice that people in Michigan sound a lot like people in Ontario (maybe just Western Ontario). So regional accents actually can cross borders, eh? Like most Americans I don't really know anything about Elwy Yost, but it sounds like he was someone special (maybe RO emulated him). I can imagine the sense of loss, my sympathies. Right now I have this strange picture of Roy Scheider in "Jaws", with Canadian accent saying, "We better get a bigger aboot, eh?"

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I'm reviving this thread for a very sad reason. I don't expect non-Canadians to know about or be interested in this - this post is just addressed to all my fellow Canadians on this fansite.

 

I am very sad about the death of Jack Layton today. Whatever one's political viewpoint might be, Jack seemed to be liked by almost everybody, even his political opponents. He was a person of committment, integrity, and compassion. Sometimes I agreed with his policies, sometimes I did not; but I always respected him. It is a sad day for Canada.

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As a Canadian can you tell me what percent of movies shown in Canadian theaters are Canadian or US? I just wonder how big movie making is in Canada. I cannot recall ever seeing a Canadian movie. Would I be able to tell the difference? Does Canadian cinema have a history like the French? e.g. are their black and white Canadian movies from the 40s and 50?

 

Sorry for asking so many questions but I just realized I know so little about my neighbors.

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Thanks for the link (yea, I was lazy!). I did find the one stat I was most interested in and that is the Canadian movie industry market share. Wow less than 5% in the English speaking areas (and they needed a law to even get up to that).

 

I felt the percent could be very low since language isn't a barrier for US imports but I didn't think it would be that low. Now I'll have to look at Britian and see what their percent is just as a comparision.

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This is the ultimate in resurrecting a dormant thread. How did you find it? I've tried to find old threads, with no success.

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Happy Canada Day to you, mw, from a d***ed Yankee.

 

Is it 'Canada' day or 'Canadian' day? :)

 

On another board, Canadians were relating that they went to Tim Hortons for breakfast to celebrate. When I ventured to see if TM and their wonderful donuts made it across the border, I saw that they did BUT their name is associated with the dastardly disgusting Cold Stone Creamery, makers of the ice cream that has pudding in the mix so they can smash in your gummie bears without the faux 'ice cream' melting. Dis-gusting.

 

Did TH buy CSC or is the vice the versa? I hope it's the former. Do Canadians like their ice cream disgusting with vile junk mixed in?

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