Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

APRIL 14, 1994, A DAY OF CLASSIC MOVIE CELEBRATION


Recommended Posts

I started watching TCM regularly in February 1998, though I knew of TCM from its birth on April 14, 1992. I did not have access to TCM in 1992 because Comcast did not have the channel as part of their cable package where I lived in Florida. We had American Movie Classics. With the way the world was then as it is now with the abundance of recording devices for video I was wondering if anyone in TCM Nation has tape of the evening of April 14, 1992 when TCM first started broadcasting which they could post on "You Tube" so we can see the inaugural of our favorite channel.

 

I also have a trivia question: We all know "Gone With the Wind" was the first movie broadcast on TCM. What was the second movie broadcast on TCM? I have always wanted to know the answer to that bit of trivia. Thank you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>What was the second movie broadcast on TCM?

 

It was North by Northwest, which immediately sparked an outcry from outraged viewers, complaining "Oh no, not North by Northwest again," or "why is TCM showing newer films." Then TCM showed Bringing Up Baby, which calmed everyone down, except for the paleontologist co-host, who moaned that the dinosaur skeleton was being portrayed as an evil monster.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

> I started watching TCM regularly in February 1998, though I knew of TCM from its birth on April 14, 1992.

 

No, it was not 1992 but April 14, 1994 that TCM started.

And actually the very first thing that ran was the Chuck Workman compilation short "100 Years at the Movies" at noon.

Then at 12:10 P.M. GONE WITH THE WIND started, billed as" Complete Road Show version with Overture, Intermission and Exit Music, plus Rare Footage from the Atlanta 1964 Civil War Centennial Re-issue." 222 minutes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> I also have a trivia question: We all know "Gone With the Wind" was the first movie broadcast on TCM. What was the second movie broadcast on TCM? I have always wanted to know the answer to that bit of trivia. Thank you.

Here ya go...more than you wanted to know:

After GONE WITH THE WIND on April 14 they ran

SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (1952) plus deleted musical number "You Are My Lucky Star".

"100 Years at the Movies" repeated.

GONE WITH THE WIND repeated.

SINGIN' IN THE RAIN repeated.

IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT (1934)

THE PETRIFIED FOREST (1936)

THE CAT PEOPLE (1942)

 

Friday, April 15, 1994:

THE STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR (1936)

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (1946)

THE INFORMER (1935)

THE PIRATE (1948)

CITIZEN KANE (1941)

CEILING ZERO (1935)

THE ASPHALT JUNGLE (1950)

Greta Garbo trailers.

ANNA CHRISTIE (1930) - English language version.

ANNA CHRISTIE (1930) - German language version.

ANNA KARENINA (1935)

LOVE (1927) plus alternate ending.

"MGM Parade" #30 - Greta Garbo.

"MGM Parade" #31 - Greta Garbo.

THE SINGLE STANDARD (1929)

AS YOU DESIRE ME (1931)

Hollywood themed shorts.

 

Saturday, April 16, 1994:

PETTICOAT FEVER (1936)

THREE LOVES HAS NANCY (1938)

SMILIN' THROUGH (1932)

EASY TO WED (1946)

EASY TO LOVE (1953)

BABY FACE (1933)

BEAUTY AND THE BOSS (1932)

A SOUTHERN YANKEE (1948)

ADAM'S RIB (1949)

RICH AND FAMOUS (1981)

OLD ACQUAINTANCE (1943)

THE OLD MAID (1939)

JUAREZ (1939)

Historical shorts.

 

Sunday, April 17, 1994:

APRIL SHOWERS (1948)

ENCHANTED APRIL (1935)

LADY FROM SHANGHAI (1948)

CASTLE ON THE HUDSON (1940)

RAINTREE COUNTY (1957) with Overture, Intermission and Exit Music.

GONE WITH THE WIND (1939) Complete Road Show version with Overture, Intermission and Exit music.

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS (1966)

YOUNG BESS (1953)

IVANHOE (1952)

THE CAMERAMAN (1928)

SPITE MARRIAGE (1929)

THE COMIC (1969)

 

Monday, April 18, 1994:

PANAMA HATTIE (1942)

MAISIE (1939)

PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART (1933)

IN PERSON (1935)

THE GIRL WHO HAD EVERYTHING (1953)

THE AMBUSHERS (1967)

WRECKING CREW (1968)

MISS SADIE THOMPSON (1953)

THE ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN (1949)

MY FAVORITE YEAR (1982)

Errol Flynn trailers and shorts.

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE (1936)

ESCAPE ME NEVER (1947)

GREEN LIGHT (1937)

ANOTHER DAWN (1937)

 

Tuesday, April 19, 1994:

SMART BLONDE (1936)

CONGO MAISIE (1940)

SMART GIRLS DON'T TALK (1948)

THE GIRL FROM JONES BEACH (1949)

TUNNEL OF LOVE (1958)

A PRIZE OF GOLD (1955)

SUMMER WISHES, WINTER DREAMS (1973)

YOU'LL NEVER GET RICH (1941)

BLOSSOMS IN THE DUST (1941)

Shorts/trailers.

WOMAN OF THE YEAR (1942)

MAYTIME (1937)

SWEETHEARTS (1938)

THE GIRL OF THE GOLDEN WEST (1938)

Western/musical shorts.

 

Wednesday, April 20, 1994:

FLY-AWAY BABY (1937)

Shorts.

GOLD RUSH MAISIE (1940)

THE PERFECT SPECIMEN (1937)

BLONDIE JOHNSON (1933)

TORCH SONG (1953)

THE LAW AND THE LADY (1951)

CALLAWAY WENT THATAWAY (1951)

FIRE DOWN BELOW (1957)

LITTLE WOMEN (1933)

DAVID COPPERFIELD (1935)

ROMEO AND JULIET (1936)

PRIVATE LIVES (1931)

TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN (1929)

MGM 1925 Studio Tour.

 

Thursday, April 21, 1994:

ADVENTUROUS BLONDE (1937)

Shorts.

MAISIE WAS A LADY (1941)

THE DOUGHGIRLS (1944)

THE FOOTLOOSE HEIRESS (1937)

TOO YOUNG TO KISS (1951)

HIGH BARBAREE (1947)

TEXAS CARNIVAL (1951)

YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER (1942)

NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA (1971)

MAYERLING (1968)

RASPUTIN AND THE EMPRESS (1932)

DEVIL MAY CARE (1929)

CALL OF THE FLESH (1930)

 

Friday, April 22, 1994:

BLONDES AT WORK (1938)

Shorts.

RINGSIDE MAISIE (1941)

STALLION ROAD (1947)

THE DECISION OF CHRISTOPHER BLAKE (1948)

THE GAY SISTERS (1942)

EXPRIMENT PERILOUS (1944)

THE LEOPARD MAN (1943)

GILDA (1946)

DR. STRANGELOVE (1963)

LOLITA (1962)

THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (1948)

THE RUNNING MAN (1963)

THE KEY (1958)

Shorts.

 

Saturday, April 23, 1994:

TRAIL OF '98 (1928)

AFRICA ADVENTURE (1954)

MOGAMBO (1953)

ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS (1948)

THE TIME, THE PLACE AND THE GIRL (1946)

DR. X (1932)

HIS GIRL FRIDAY (1940)

Short: JIMMY FIDLER'S PERSONALITY PARADE (1938)

Jean Harlow/Clark Gable trailers.

RED DUST (1932)

HOLD YOUR MAN (1933)

CHINA SEAS (1935)

THE HARDER THEY FALL (1956)

FAT CITY (1972)

THE SET-UP (1949)

Boxer shorts.

 

Sunday, April 24, 1994:

THE HATCHET MAN (1932)

DESTROYER (1943)

LADY IN THE LAKE (1946)

THE CASE OF THE VELVET CLAWS (1936)

1776 (1972)

SCARLET COAT (1955)

GEORGE WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE (1942)

CIRCUS CLOWN (1934)

MERRY ANDREW (1958)

JUMBO (1962)

WAGONS ROLL AT NIGHT (1941)

FREAKS (1932)

HE WHO GETS SLAPPED (1924)

O'SHAUGNESSY'S BOY (1935)

Circus themed shorts.

 

That's enough for now!

I can post more if anyone cares.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Has there ever been a day on TCM when they pre-empted classic film programming? For example, were there any interruptions the day the World Trade Center was bombed ten years ago?

 

No, there never has.

And they carried on with their scheduled programming that day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. Has there always been a SOTM? Was Garbo the first one?

 

When did the SUTS event begin?

 

And while we're at it, when was the first series about race in Hollywood film?

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote} Has there always been a SOTM? Was Garbo the first one?

A few months ago I went through all my old schedules and filled in all the gaps and made corrections to the previously posted incomplete list of all the Stars of the Month.

I REALLY don't feel like doing all that agian. That complete and correct list should (hopefully) be accessible through a search.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks musicalnovelty. I wasn't asking for the entire list.

 

My question is more about the first month. Since they did not start on the first of April and since I see Garbo films near the very beginning I was wondering if they focused on her or if they waited to start the SOTM in May.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There has always been a star of the month.

August 2003 was the first time TCM did SUTS.

I think that the Race In Hollywood series began about 5 or 6 years ago, with African Americans being the first group to be examined (I'm pretty sure anyway).

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Thanks musicalnovelty. I wasn't asking for the entire list. My question is more about the first month. Since they did not start on the first of April and since I see Garbo films near the very beginning I was wondering if they focused on her or if they waited to start the SOTM in May.

Here's a list through March of this year:

 

STAR OF THE MONTH:

 

May 1994: Greta Garbo

June 1994: Glenn Ford

July 1994: Greer Garson

Aug. 1994: Edward G. Robinson

Sept. 1994: Barbara Stanwyck

Oct. 1994: Angela Lansbury

Nov. 1994 John Garfield

Dec. 1994: Best of 1994

 

Jan. 1995: Esther Williams

Feb. 1995: Ronald Reagan

Mar. 1995: TCM Salutes the Oscars

Apr. 1995: Doris Day

May 1995: Myrna Loy

June 1995: Errol Flynn

July 1995: Gene Kelly

Aug. 1995: Paul Muni

Sept.1995: Jane Powell

Oct. 1995: Clark Gable

Nov. 1995: Barrymores

Dec. 1995: Best of 1995

 

Jan. 1996: Deborah Kerr

Feb. 1996: 31 Days of Oscar

April 1996: Irene Dunne

May 1996: James Stewart

June 1996: Rosalind Russell

July 1996: Fred Astaire

Aug. 1996: Ann Sheridan

Sept. 1996: Van Johnson

Oct. 1996: Kathryn Grayson

Nov. 1996: Robert Mitchum

Dec. 1996: Best of 1996

 

Jan. 1997: Humphrey Bogart

Feb. 1997: Eleanor Parker

Mar. 1997: 31 Days of Oscar

Apr. 1997: Ava Gardner

May 1997: George Brent

June 1997: June Allyson

July 1997: John and Walter Huston (also Director of the Month)

Aug. 1997: Cary Grant

Sept. 1997: Ida Lupino

Oct. 1997: Walter Pidgeon

Nov. 1997: Katharine Hepburn

Dec. 1997: Best of 1997

 

Jan.1998: Lana Turner

Feb.1998: Charlton Heston

Mar.1998: 31 Days of Oscar

April 1998: Red Skelton

May 1998: Olivia de Havilland

June 1998: James Cagney

July 1998: Lucille Ball

August 1998: Joan Crawford

Sept. 1998: John Wayne

Oct. 1998: Cyd Charisse

Nov. 1998: Claude Rains

Dec. 1998: Best of 1998

 

Jan. 1999: Elizabeth Taylor

Feb. 1999: William Powell

March 1999: 31 Days of Oscar

April 1999: Dennis Morgan

May 1999: Bette Davis

June 1999: Mickey Rooney

July 1999: Natalie Wood

August 1999: Peter Sellers

Sept.1999: Norma Shearer

Oct. 1999: Gregory Peck

Nov. 1999: Ginger Rogers

Dec. 1999: Burt Lancaster

 

Jan. 2000: Debbie Reynolds

Feb. 2000: Robert Ryan

March 2000: 31 Days of Oscars

April 2000: Spencer Tracy

May 2000: Alexis Smith

June 2000:Wallace Beery

July 2000: Judy Garland

August 2000: film debuts

Sept 2000: Jane Wyman

October 2000: Dick Powell

Nov 2000: Frank Sinatra

Dec. 2000: Lauren Bacall

 

Jan. 2001: Elvis Presley

Feb. 2001: Jean Hagen

March 2001: 31 Days of Oscar

Apr. 2001: Knighted Actors

May 2001: Jean Harlow

June 2001: W.C. Fields

July 2001: Ann Sothern

Aug. 2001: James Garner

Sept. 2001: Robert Taylor

Oct. 2001: Lana Turner

Nov. 2001: Glenn Ford

Dec. 2001: The Marx Brothers

 

Jan. 2002: Marlene Dietrich

Feb. 2002: Kirk Douglas

March 2002: 31 Days of Oscar

April 2002: Barbara Stanwyck

May 2002: Edward G. Robinson

June 2002: Greta Garbo

July 2002: Sidney Poitier

Aug. 2002: Joan Crawford

Sept. 2002: Van Heflin

Oct. 2002: Final films

Nov. 2002: Shelly Winters

Dec. 2002: Montgomery Clift

 

Jan. 2003: Doris Day

Feb. 2003: John Garfield

Mar. 2003: 31 Days of Oscar

Apr. 2003: Harold Lloyd

May 2003: Olivia de Havilland

June 2003: TV Actors in Films

July 2003: Lee Marvin

Aug. 2003: 1st Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2003: James Mason

Oct. 2003: Boris Karloff

Nov. 2003: Shirley MacLaine

Dec. 2003: David Niven

 

Jan. 2004: Katherine Hepburn

Feb. 2004: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2004: Charles Chaplin

Apr. 2004: Judy Garland

May 2004: Greer Garson

June 2004: Cary Grant

July 2004: Stars That Died Before Their Time

Aug. 2004: 2nd Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2004: Myrna Loy

Oct. 2004: Peter Lorre

Nov. 2004: Clark Gable

Dec. 2004: James Stewart

 

Jan. 2005: Canadian Actors

Feb. 2005: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2005: Claudette Colbert

Apr. 2005: Errol Flynn

May 2005: Orson Welles

June 2005: Ingrid Bergman

July 2005: Audrey Hepburn

Aug. 2005: 3rd Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2005: Greta Garbo

Oct. 2005: Robert Mitchum

Nov. 2005: Joan Fontaine

Dec. 2005: Bing Crosby

 

Jan. 2006: Robert Montgomery

Feb. 2006: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2006: Nelson Eddy & Jeanette MacDonald

Apr. 2006: Deborah Kerr

May 2006: Bette Davis

June 2006: Anthony Quinn

July 2006: Elizabeth Taylor

Aug. 2006: 4th Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2006: William Holden

Oct. 2006: Child Stars

Nov. 2006: Lucille Ball

Dec. 2006: Gary Cooper

 

Jan. 2007: Jean Arthur

Feb. 2007: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2007: Gene Kelly

Apr. 2007: Rita Hayworth

May 2007: John Wayne and Katherine Hepburn

June 2007: Ida Lupino

July 2007: Randolph Scott

Aug. 2007: 5th Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2007: A Star is Born (starmaking/breakthrough performances)

Oct. 2007: Henry Fonda

Nov. 2007: Guest Programmer Month

Dec. 2007: Irene Dunne

Jan. 2008: James Cagney

Feb. 2008: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2008: Acting Dynasties

Apr. 2008: Hedy Lamarr

May 2008: Frank Sinatra

June 2008: Sophia Loren

July 2008: Rosalind Russell

Aug. 2008: 6th annual Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2008: Kay Francis

Oct. 2008: Carole Lombard

Nov. 2008: Charles Laughton

Dec. 2008: Joseph Cotten

 

Jan. 2009: Jack Lemmon

Feb. 2009: 31 Days of Oscar

Mar. 2009: Ronald Reagan

April 2009: Funny Ladies and 15th Anniversary

May 2009: Sean Connery

June 2009: Great Directors

July 2009: Stewart Granger

August 2009: Summer Under the Stars

Sept. 2009: Claude Rains

Oct. 2009: Leslie Caron

Nov. 2009: Grace Kelly

Dec. 2009: Humphrey Bogart

 

Jan. 2010: The Method”

Feb. 2010: 31 Days of Oscar

March 2010: Ginger Rogers

April 2010: Robert Taylor

May 2010: Donna Reed

June 2010: Natalie Wood

July 2010: Gregory Peck

August 2010: SUTS

Sept. 2010: Vivien Leigh

Oct. 2010: Fredric March

Nov. 2010: Ava Gardner

Dec. 2010: Mickey Rooney

 

Jan. 2011: Peter Sellers

Feb. 2011: 31 Days of Oscar

March 2011: Jean Harlow

Link to post
Share on other sites

TCM presented the first installment of the "Race And Hollywood" initiative in 2006.

 

That edition in 2006 surveyed "Black Images on Film" and was co-hosted by author Donald Bogle. Two years later, in 2008, TCM presented "Race And Hollywood: Asian Images on FIlm" co-hosted by author Peter X. Feng.

 

In 2009, TCM presented "Race And Hollywood: Latino Images on Film" co-hosted by UCLA professor Chon Noriega and last year TCM's look at racial stereotypes on film delivered "Race And Hollywood: Native American Images on Film" with Professor Hanay Geiogamah of UCLA.

 

Additionally, in 2007 TCM invited author Richard Barrios to co-host a thematically similar series titled "Screened Out: Gay Images on Film."

 

Including this year's series on "Arab Images on FIlm", TCM has programmed six different Spotlights on minority images in Hollywood films.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

Link to post
Share on other sites

*"...just the smell of MGM brings on dry heaves."* - "MrZither"

 

There certainly is a strange outbreak of gastro-intestinal problems around here tonight.

Did you and 'darkblue' share Thai food earlier today?

 

Kyle In Hollywood

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A couple of things I noticed from the first few days of TCM schedules:

 

First, what were Columbias doing there? I thought for the first couple of years TCM programmed exclusively from Ted Turner's library. The Columbias I noticed were:

 

LADY FROM SHANGHAI (1948)

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS (1966)

THE COMIC (1969)

FIRE DOWN BELOW (1957)

NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA (1971)

GILDA (1946)

DR. STRANGELOVE (1963)

1776 (1972)

 

I also noticed that at least once that TCM showed the 1929 version of Trial of Mary Dugan.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

First, thanks to musicalnovelty for again posting the SOTM info.

 

Calvin, I noticed the inclusion of the Columbia (Sony) pics, too. In fact, I was surprised to see Glenn Ford as the second SOTM honoree. A large number of his screen hits occurred for Harry Cohn at Columbia. He certainly freelanced later and did his share of MGM films in the 50s and 60s, but the first decade of his career is almost entirely at Columbia.

 

What I also noticed is that there were many repeat showings, some on the same day even (not just GWTW), and I find that interesting. If it happened now, subscribers would squawk.

 

Also, there seem to be pictures like THE COMIC (1969) and 1776 (made in 1972) that provide evidence that TCM was incorporating titles from the post-production code era right at the start.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is some more of the *SOTM* from my listings:

 

April 2011: Ray Milland

May 2011: Esther Williams

June 2011: Jean Simmons

July 2011: Singing Cowboys

August 2011: *SUTS*

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing some of those Columbia films TCM showed in its infancy no longer belonged to Columbia itself, but to independent producers who may have sold their rights to other packagers that found their way to the Turner library.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please forgive me for the typo. I writhe everytime I look at the subject of this thread which I created and see 1992. I knew it was 1994.

 

It is very educational to see the titles screened and the "Star of the Month" subjects during the early years of TCM. I was hoping someone would have video on what TCM looked like when it debut in April 1994 or the first year of broadcast. No such luck.

 

Was Robert Osborne hosting the weekend hours along with hosting the prime time hours during the first year of TCM?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Robert Osborne hosted the daytime hours on the weekend until 2004 (I think that's when Ben came on board.) He would host the daytime hours without a necktie and then he'd be all spruced up for the evenings. He did not host The Essentials for the first 4 years, however. He only started that when Molly Haskell was the co-host and has since remained the co-host because frankly, until Alec Baldwin came along, the people he hosted with seemed to need his input.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}Please forgive me for the typo. I writhe everytime I look at the subject of this thread which I created and see 1992. I knew it was 1994.

Hey, typos happen...but it's too bad it's too late now to go back and fix it. It would be nice if one of the Moderators would, though, since it's clearly an error, and is now misleading when seen in the Thread Title. And I'm sure such a little change (from a 2 to a 4) is within their powers. How about it, Moderators?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}

>

>

>

> I was hoping someone would have video on what TCM looked like when it debut in April 1994 or the first year of broadcast. No such luck.

>

>

>

>

>

>

I don't have a tape of that very first day, but do still have several from the first few weeks & months of TCM. I did not get the channel right away either, but had a few good friends in other parts of the country who would record special requests for me (thanks Brian, Jim and Dave!) if I tried to keep from asking for too many (which was very difficult!) Actually I didn't know many people who did get TCM right away. People I knew were receiving it through a satellite dish set-up, not regular cable in those very early days.

 

Anyway, looking at those old tapes, things were not all that different in the beginning. Robert Osborne looked younger of course, but it was conducted pretty similar to how it is today.

 

Edited by: musicalnovelty on Jul 28, 2011 2:32 PM to add that not only was it almost impossible to find a cable company that carried TCM right from the start in April 1994 but it was also very difficult to even find out what they were showing. TCM wasn't listed in any TV Guide or cable listing that I ever saw until much later. I had to go to satellite dish stores or large book stores and look for satellite programming books to see TCM's listings.

In July 1994 they started printing a schedule that they'd mail out to those who wrote and requested it. Then, in January 1997 the "Now Playing" guide was introduced with Humphrey Bogart as the first cover picture.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...