Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Brando


Recommended Posts

> {quote:title=Filmgoddess wrote:}{quote}Range and versatility? All of the films you mention are dramas. That's not range and versatility to me. Range and versatililty to me means the ability to do other genres. Brando was incapable of that. His one foray into a musical was a complete mess. His forays into comedy were, well, laughable, and not in a good way. He made only one good comedy -- The Freshman -- and then he disavowed that performance. Shakespeare? His performance in Julius Caesar is basically Terry Malloy in a toga. It reminds me of Tony Curtis "Yonda lies da castle of my fudduh." Aargh.

>

> I'd say that Irene Dunne was more versatile than Marlon Brando. To me, versatile means moving from genre to genre and be successful in each. Brando was successful only in drama -- and even there so many of the performances are so mannered. Not my cup of tea. August Moon or otherwise.

>

> He didn't just make bad choices; he gave atrocious performances.

>

> Greatest screen actor of all time? Not in the top 50 for me. Dana Andrews was a better -- and more watchable -- screen actor.

>

> Cathy Cartee

 

 

You must be talking about some different Marlon Brando, with whom I am unacquainted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rather than an attempt, a lame one, at pithiness why not an actual response?

 

Name me all those different film genres (other than drama) that Brando was so superb at. Comedy? Film noir? Musicals? Westerns? Screwball comedy? Melodrama? Anything other than an occasional fine dramatic performance and years of over-the-top, over dramatizing scenery chewing?

 

Cathy in Timbuktu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Lassie is boring. I wonder if there are any actors or actresses that everyone agrees on?

 

Overrated: Marlon Brando, Gregory Peck,

Underrated: Irene Dunne, Myrna Loy, William Powell, Olivia de Havilland

Could do no wrong: Barbara Stanwyck, James Stewart, Spencer Tracy

 

Agree? Disagree?

 

Cathy in Timbuktu

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Filmgoddess wrote:}{quote}Rather than an attempt, a lame one, at pithiness why not an actual response?

>

> Name me all those different film genres (other than drama) that Brando was so superb at. Comedy? Film noir? Musicals? Westerns? Screwball comedy? Melodrama? Anything other than an occasional fine dramatic performance and years of over-the-top, over dramatizing scenery chewing?

>

> Cathy in Timbuktu

 

Well, frankly, I didn't know where to begin, you so completely panned him. First, I don't accept your premise that he has to play well in various genres to be versatile, and have range. Brando did mainly drama, but played a wide range of characters, and did so very well, IMO. His emotional and character range was rather wide. Stanley Kowalski and Marc Antony are about as far apart as two characters can get. I think his performances in both were very powerful. I didn't find him to "chew the scenery" in *Julius Caesar* any more than is the norm for Shakespeare, in fact, somewhat less.

 

He did do several excellent westerns, directing one, *One-Eyed Jacks*. I have no doubt he would have been excellent in film noir. A few of his films at the very least leaned that way. Personally, I think my favorite film of his, *The Fugitive Kind* is a noir. *The Teahouse of the August Moon* was about as close to screwball comedy as was being made, while Brando was acting. I'll admit I'm not a fan of that film, but it's not his fault that I am not. It shows me enough to believe that he could have done a good comedy, if he had been in one. If you want to tell me he never should have taken the part of a Japanese, I'll agree, but point out that that sort of thing was the norm, then.

 

In summary, even in the films of his I don't like, I usually find his performances fascinating. Most of his performances I find powerful, and affecting. Certainly not " years of over-the-top, over dramatizing scenery chewing."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>One-Eyed Jacks is the only film that Brando directed. I think it's a fine film, and would rather have had TCM run it that a couple of others that get shown a lot.

 

That was a great film. I wonder why it's not on TV anymore?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw it on commercial-free cable a couple of years ago, but don't remember which channel. I'd rather have seen it, and *The Appaloosa* than about half the films they are showing. I already have most of them on DVD, including *Reflections in a Golden Eye*. :)

 

Addendum: *One-Eyed Jacks* has my favorite Ben Johnson role, too.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Aug 1, 2011 8:43 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with Brando! I told my husband that the overwrought method thing just puts me off (so dated!). Dana Andrews was good, but seems a little wooden at times. The best actor in films, bar none, would have to be Fredric March. I could watch him hanging wallpaper!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=JakeHolman wrote:}{quote}Some I like. Of course, The Godfather is one of the best ever made. We could use a Don Vito Corleone in this country right now: *results*.

>

> Jake in the Heartland

>

Ooooh, now THERE'S a thought!

 

Ya know Jake, I'm startin' to get the idea that you're not one who believes a "Leader" should lead by consensus...like a certain somebody who appears to do just a little too much of nowdays.

 

 

(LOL!)

 

 

Of course, after reading more than a few of your "favorite lines in movies", this little revelation isn't exactly surprising to me!!!

 

 

(now I'm ROFL!!!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, and NOW back to BRANDO!!!!

 

(...excuse me while I try to stop chuckling here....okay...I think I've got it under control now....)

 

Actually, I think Cathy makes a fairly good point about Marlon's, well, lets say, "inclination" to be "a little" one-dimensional in his roles. Sorry, let me rephrase that...to have picked parts which might showcase how versatile he could've maybe been...like say, one of MY favorite actors...Gene Hackman.

 

 

(...well at least I certainly can't think of a time when Brando ever made me laugh out loud anyway!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey now VX, I wouldn't go THAT far!

 

I mean that bio DID say that she worked with ANOTHER hard-headed, ultra-large-ego-ladened and hard-to-work-with actor by the name of Steve McQueen in *Junior Bonner* TOO, ya know!

 

(...what?!...didn't ya get that far down on that page or somethin'???)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cathy in Timbuktu asked: Agree? Disagree?

 

Gregory Peck can *never, ever* be overrated. One of the finest actors ever to appear on screen. I nearly always believed him in whatever role he played-the exception being *Duel in the Sun* which I think is overrated. The whole movie was unbelievable as most everybody in it and I'm a Joseph Cotten fan too.

 

As for Brando-I saw *Streetcar* on the screen at the Festival and was knocked speechless by the whole thing, not just his work. *On the Waterfront* is still the best movie ever made and Eva Marie Saint and he deserved everything they won. I'll never get tired of *Sayonara.* I am so tired of *The Godfather* I can't be objective about it now. I do agree with you on your other two lists.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read the whole article. She also worked with Frederic March. My comment was meant half in jest, but IMO, Brando is easily the best of the lot she worked with, including McQueen, whom I like. And, who is to say which actor Mary would find most inspiring? Brando is as likely as any, more likely than most.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re: Brando

Posted: Aug 1, 2011 9:26 AM

 

You're putting Robert Walker in some pretty heady company.

 

Well I think if he hadn't died young then he would be more well known. I think he is a very underated actor... if you don't believe me just watch The Clock (1945) and Strangers On A Train (1951). Very underated.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are spot on about Robert Walker! He gives a touching performance in Since You Went Away also. It must have been difficult for him given the real life circumstances going on during that production. Love him in The Clock as well. Maybe we will see him next year "Under The Stars"!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=J.W.Harbert wrote:}{quote}The main reason I tuned in to Junior Bonner was because Ida Lupino was in it. Now there was a talented individual!

Well personally, the only reason I've ever watched(a total of maybe 4 times) that sloooooooooooooooooow moving flick was to see Prescott Arizona in the 1970s...as that's where my wife and I have retired to a few years ago....though it seems whenever Robert Preston is in a scene, the movie gets a little better.

 

Yep. What was it about Peckinpah anyway? I mean the dude EITHER gives ya violence galore, a la *The Wild Bunch *or *The Getaway *, OR some REALLY slooooooow moving character-driven story such as *Junior Bonner *or *The Ballad of Cable Hogue *.

 

 

(...oh wait...we we're talkin' about Brando here, huh?!...sorry...continue on folks!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We all have our reasons I guess. Sorry, I live in the middle of Kentucky now. I have never been to the great state of Arizona (though I hope to get there eventually!). Robert Preston rocks as well! Seventies movies usually leave me flat too (rotton time to be a teenager!). Now the topic we were supposed to be discussing was some guy.... Marlon.... ???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had never seen *Don Juan de Marco*, until last year. It didn't sound like something I'd like, but with Johnny Depp, and Marlon, well, I had to see it. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Not a great film, but those two made it believable, and they really rose above the material.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>After reading that bio, I guess she just never found another costar as inspiring as Marlon. Certainly not Dale Robertson.

 

Hmm, I never thought of that. So you think she did so well in "The Wild One" specifically because she was playing opposite Brando?

 

I like that idea. Maybe they should have teamed up again.

 

But maybe it was the director.

 

I've seen Glenn Anders acting in several films, but he is just a nothing/nobody except in "The Lady from Shanghai", which was directed by Orson Welles. In that film Anders stole the whole show as wacko attorney George Grisby. Never was Anders so good before or after that film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think a great actor should be too great for any role, if they are that great they should be able to play almost anything, even if that includes toning it down a lot.

 

Sort of like Brando being miscast in the Mutiny on the Bounty, he seemed more like Captain Bligh's twin in that movie, instead of being Fletcher Christian. I thought Brando should have been cast as Captain Bligh and that movie would have been much better, but he overpowered Howard and everyone else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...