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Laughton played this with the ultimate evil and rottenness... Maybe Brando could have portrayed the part with a cold, sociopathic, indifferentness that could approach the original. I am not sure if Laughton's performance could be surpassed.

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I don't think you understand - I wanted Brando to play Fletcher Christian to Laughton's Bligh. I liked Brando's very conflicted Fletcher Christian. I'm sure Brando could do a decent Bligh, but I was not suggesting that.

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> {quote:title=J.W.Harbert wrote:}{quote}Laughton played this with the ultimate evil and rottenness... *Maybe Brando could have portrayed the part with a cold, sociopathic, indifferentness that could approach the original.* I am not sure if Laughton's performance could be surpassed.

Ummmm...well, I do believe Anthony Hopkins kinda sorta portrayed Bligh in just that manner in the 1984 version of this story, J.W. But yeah, I do agree that Brando's usual "brooding" in films would've made him a much more believable Bligh than he was as Christian in the '62 version.

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I know that a lot of people don't like Brando's Fletcher Christian. He "broods," as you say, he's conflicted, as I say. I like that, but many prefer a more determined macho sort of a portrayal. But, I don't see Bligh brooding at all. He is VERY sure of himself, very determined in his infamy.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}I don't think you understand - I wanted Brando to play Fletcher Christian to Laughton's Bligh. I liked Brando's very conflicted Fletcher Christian. I'm sure Brando could do a decent Bligh, but I was not suggesting that.

C'mon VX, admit it. Gable was perfectly cast AND did a great job as Christian in the '35 version. And yeah, he even conveys that whole "conflicted" emotion in it too. Plus, Gable was much more convincing as a "leader of men"(mutinous men, though they be) than Brando's "introspective"-bent performance would lead people to believe.

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I didn't say Gable was bad, he was good, but he was much less conflicted than Brando, who tore himself up inside, over his decision, and its effect on the crew.

 

Was Gable "more convincing as a leader of men?" Well, maybe, but that's what I meant when I said that many prefer a more determined Fletcher, rather than Brando's agonizing Fletcher.

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Uh huh, and truth be told, I thought Mel Gibson played Christian just about spot on in the '84 version too...

 

(...and now for the obligatory Gibson joke here, forks....)

 

 

...except, of course, for that part where he really went off on crewman Lebowitz!!!

 

 

(...I always thought that that verged on overacting...well, until a couple years ago, anyway...and then I started seeing "The Method" to his character's rage and it all became so clear!)

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To Dargo and Valentine: If I was a man (which I am not, although I live in a male dominated household) I would follow Clark Gable. Most men I know do not brood so much. He faces his doubts, makes his decisions, and sticks with them. God bless testosterone!!!

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Hey J.Dub...there's no need to tell ME that, bro! I'm in total agreement with ya here, ol' buddy!

 

(...I think it's VX who is still kinda feelin' that there might be a group o' guys who'd follow some brooding, introspective dude to the four corners of the world...I sure wouldn't...well, unless he was a good cook or somethin' maybe!...nah...not even then!)

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You do have a point. This system is probably what allowed the officers to get away with so much. Of course Gable is the hero of so many films. His persona must have pulled many fans through the depression. At that time audiences would not have wanted to see him stewing over his decisions. Later on, say in the fifties when Brando was popular, audiences would be facinated at watching his method, scenery chewing acting style. The self torture and doubt would have seemed revolutionary at the time. We all have different tastes.

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> {quote:title=darkblue wrote:}{quote}Those no-account wretches who goaded Christian into mutiny would've followed anyone.

Yeah dark! And here they all had SUCH a nice little happy home on Bligh's little boat, huh?!

 

What WERE they thinkin', HUH?!

 

(oh, I know...they were probably thinkin' somethin' like.."Well, I certainly hope that breadfruit is as tasty as they say, 'cause I'm startin' to think all this BS Bligh is dishin' out suuuuuure might not be worth it, boy!")

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Geez, if Youtube can run it, why cant TCM show it?????? Sorry, I've never seen it. It was panned by critics at the time and flopped, but that doesnt necessarily mean it deserved it...

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> {quote:title=J.W.Harbert wrote:}{quote}

>To Dargo and Valentine: If I was a man (which I am not, although I live in a male dominated household) I would follow Clark Gable. Most men I know do not brood so much. He faces his doubts, makes his decisions, and sticks with them. God bless testosterone!!!

 

>Dargo wrote:

>(...I think it's VX who is still kinda feelin' that there might be a group o' guys who'd follow some brooding, introspective dude to the four corners of the world...I sure wouldn't...well, unless he was a good cook or somethin' maybe!...nah...not even then!)

 

No question, if I were one of the mutineers, I would have preferred Gable's Fletcher as a leader to Brando's. Gable was much more decisive. And, as I have said here repeatedly, but apparently not made myself clear, I realize that most people prefer the Gable style hero to the Brando style hero, and so that is the way heroes are usually portrayed. But, as a performance, I find Brando's Fletcher much more interesting. And, as DarkBlue points out, An officer in Fletcher's position would be more likely to suffer the self-recriminations of Brando's Fletcher, than the 'don't look back' Gable performance.

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> No question, if I were one of the mutineers, I would have preferred Gable's Fletcher as a leader to Brando's. Gable was much more decisive. And, as I have said here repeatedly, but apparently not made myself clear, I realize that most people prefer the Gable style hero to the Brando style hero, and so that is the way heroes are usually portrayed. But, as a performance, I find Brando's Fletcher much more interesting. And, as DarkBlue points out, An officer in Fletcher's position would be more likely to suffer the self-recriminations of Brando's Fletcher, than the 'don't look back' Gable performance.

Ya see, that's just my point here VX. I don't know when the last time you've watched the '35 version, but Gable's performance has a lot more depth than I think you're giving him credit for. Gable DOES "look back" in that version, and shows his regrets for never being about to return to England.

 

The only difference is that before "looking back", Gable gets angry about the injustices done to the crew, whereas Brando's reactions are more of the "Oh, the humanity" handwring style.

 

Heck, they could've gotten poor little ol' doe-eyed Montgomery Clift to play it that way, or a number of different actors who I think could've pulled THAT off!

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Your use of Davis as it relates to Brando is a good one. Note that for someone to claim an actor, musician, artist etc... is overrated the performer must be highly rated by critics or fans.

 

Thus in some ways to be overrated is something to be proud about (e.g. Loni isn't overrated since she isn't rated at all!).

 

Here is my view on 'Brando is overrated'. For most classic movie fans Brando represents the start of the second generation of classic movie actors. This so called clash between generation can be illustrated with the Bogie Brando oscar battle in the early 50s. Bogie gets the oscar in 51 for African Queen over Brando in Street Car. Brando is nominated in 52, 53, and again in 54. In 54 he wins for On the Waterfront and beats Bogie in Caine Mutiny. The torch has been passed so to speak.

 

Add to this the method acting style and one can see why some fans have very strong feelings as it relates to Brando. Are they commenting only on their feelings for Brando or does Brando represent something more related to the above? Add to this Brando's fairly quick decline (in post output and in my view quailty) by decade; i.e. his work in the 50s verses the 60s, verses the 70s etc...

 

Many of the stars of the previous generation were able to produce high quailty work over multiple decades,, 30 or more years. I think this leads to the overrate tag.

 

But I don't see how one can look at Brando's work in the 50s and say he was overrated.

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}

> Thus in some ways to be overrated is something to be proud about (e.g. Loni isn't Add to this the method acting style and one can see why some fans have very strong feelings as it relates to Brando. Are they commenting only on their feelings for Brando or does Brando represent something more related to the above? Add to this Brando's fairly quick decline (in post output and in my view quailty) by decade; i.e. his work in the 50s verses the 60s, verses the 70s etc...

>

> Many of the stars of the previous generation were able to produce high quailty work over multiple decades,, 30 or more years. I think this leads to the overrate tag.

> .

 

 

I agree, James. Well said. I do think Brando is a remarkable actor in the 1950s. After that he seeks out ambitious roles, but his performances generally seem to me more self-regarding and mannered.

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