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Just to chip in my two 1/2 cents, but the Elvis comparison to Monroe seems fair because much of Monroe's publicity also surrounded her "career" outside of the movies. Since this is a G forum I will leave that to the imagination. :)

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I believe Crosby's film career does eclipsed his musical career in the minds of most people today.

 

How many people today go and buy Crosby's music, say compared to Sinatra? One can say that not many go and buy Crosby's movies either but because of the Road pictures, award winning movies like The Country Girl etc... his movies are more well known than his hit records, excluding White Christmas of course.

 

As for as comparing Monroe and Elvis; both are icons and each more famous today because of factors OTHER than their actual work. Both produced some very good work but the icon status is based mostly on their personal lives and not the legacy of their work in my opinion.

 

 

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I believe Crosby's film career does eclipsed his musical career in the minds of most people today.

 

How many people today go and buy Crosby's music, say compared to Sinatra? One can say that not many go and buy Crosby's movies either but because of the Road pictures, award winning movies like The Country Girl etc... his movies are more well known than his hit records, excluding White Christmas of course.

 

 

If that's the case, and you're probably right, more's the pity, because Bing was a revolutionary pop singer, particularly early in his career. He and Louis Armstrong popularized a new, more informal vocal style with considerable jazz influences, something that's more or less forgotten today, so much is Crosby associated with white-bread, golf-playing suburbanization. Bing loved jazz, making some superlative recordings with the Mills Brothers ("Dinah") and the Duke Ellington orchestra ("St. Louis Blues"); he was hugely popular in the black community in the 1930s, inspiring imitators both black (e.g., Harlan Lattimore) and white. (Sinatra was inspired to become a singer after watching Crosby perform on stage in Jersey City in 1932.) And let's not forget that Bing recorded the definitive version of the classic Depression anthem, "Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?", singing it with a conviction that resonated with people of the time and still astounds listeners today.

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I agree that it is sad that Crosby's music has mostly been left behind and clearly Sinatra his student in many ways passed him in terms of popular culture.

 

Crosby's relax style did work very well with jazz and he had a lot of respect for jazz musicians. He deserves to be one of the incons of 20th century entertainment and he is in my book.

 

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  • 1 year later...

Wow, I've been watching the last half of LADIES OF THE CHORUS, which is Marilyn Monroe's 1948 movie in which she is a co-star, at the age of 22.

 

I've never seen this before.

 

At last I now know that the Marilyn Monroe acting we've all become use to was a total affectation, a phony voice and mannerisms.

 

In Ladies of the Chorus, she speaks normally and acts normally. No pouting or weird voice exaggerations.

 

This was on Cinemoi on Drectv.

 

It will be on again tomorrow, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012 at 3:30 Eastern Time on Directv Channel 259.

 

It is 61 minutes long.

 

--------------------------------

 

Added to post:

 

Full movie here:

 

 

This seems to be her normal speaking voice:

 

 

And here too:

 

 

IMDB says she sings her own songs in this movie:

 

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I first met Marilyn in 1952.

 

She was in the large color calendar photo on the wall of my father's office.

 

That photo gave me the first peek at so much female anatomy.

 

I didn't know why at the time, but I really liked seeing that calendar photo of her.

 

My father told me not to look at it, so I pretended I didn't even notice it.

 

Looking back now, I think my father was secretly glad I noticed the calendar photo and stared it so much, whenever I went into his office.

 

In 1952, fathers worried about such things and wondered what kind of photos their young sons would stare at.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

>

> In 1952, fathers worried about such things and wondered what kind of photos their young sons would stare at.

 

Like George Brent's photos, for example?? ;)

(Not that there's anything wrong with BOTH MALES AND FEMALES staring at George Brent photos)

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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}If Norma Jean wasn't made into Marilyn Monroe we wouldn't know who Norma Jean was.

 

I don't agree. I think that Norma Jean could have had a long and successful career. But, we'll never know.

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A passage of a normal male's youth realizing the pleasures of the

female anatomy that MM portrayed so well.

 

I know I looked at her Playboy Pictures.

 

Jake in the Heartland

 

Edited by: JakeHolman on Nov 25, 2012 9:10 PM

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  • 6 years later...

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