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ARE WE ALL A BUNCH OF NERDS?


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*But perhaps the great dumb-down has eliminated so much vocabulary from our culture that 'nerd' has become the all-use term for pretty much everything. Easier to remember just one word notwithstanding its actual meaning. It's the new American way.*

 

Also as per the new American way, if a word (or words) is converted to text-ese, it's popular and known. BFF, and all that...

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*First time I remember hearing it was when Fonzie called somebody a nerd on Happy Days.*

 

I remember that, too! "Nerd" was the worst thing one could say about you, when I was in elementary school, because of the way Fonzie popularized it.

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In school, you were a nerd if you carried a briefcase, wore white socks, or your shirts were not madras or pin-stripe button down. There were other criteria, but it's been so long. Oh, you were also a nerd if you couldn't do the stomp (i.e., the kids in Bristol are sharp as a pistol---you know the rest)

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Ha! Although I've never been called a nerd, I've heard much worse. I am a High School Student who cannot stand the likes of The Jersey Shore Cast, and don't see the appeal in Michael Bay films.

 

I once was in an art class with a girl who I thought was a mutual outcast. Boy was I wrong.

 

You see, kids are mean. This particular girl liked Twilight, Vampires, Action Novels and Japanese Anime. I am a Chaplin fan, hence my screenname. I was once reading a book about Chaplin in some down time in art class. Emersed in my readings I hear a voice penetrating my concentration. I was tapped on the shoulder. I turned around to see this girl, she began telling me that I envy everything Hollywood is and I am a jerk for liking Classic Films and saying that I don't care for her favorite actress, Angelina Jolie.

 

What a joke. I said "That's all dandy and good, but you must understand that a part of our humanity is acceptance. I don't tell you you're a jerk for liking Angelina Jolie. By the way, I do NOT envy modern Hollywood, I pity it. It will never have a Golden Age again. You think I want to be a drug addicted, overpaid, greedy, anorexic actress starring in movies like 'The Hangover'? Go away, please, I'm reading."

 

She never talked to me again. Then I'm told that's why I have a limited amount of friends. Well, If a friend is someone who puts you down constantly and you're not allowed to stick up for yourself.....

 

Call me a nerd.

 

Sorry, I got a bit passionate with this one.

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*In school, you were a nerd if you carried a briefcase, wore white socks, or your shirts were not madras or pin-stripe button down. There were other criteria, but it's been so long. Oh, you were also a nerd if you couldn't do the stomp (i.e., the kids in Bristol are sharp as a pistol---you know the rest)*

Hm. I don't know how to do the stomp, either. I'm going to go to Google right now and find out about it and those crazy kids in Bristol.
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Dear kyle and others,

 

My short answer is that there is nothing going on on this website now that could arouse that side of me! At one time, these message boards were a totally unregulated zone that featured a lot of personal insults and flaming. When it involved minors, I went into overdrive and even spoke with the Time Warner CEO about it. That's the sort of battle ax I can be when I want to be! What I see around here nowadays is tame and actually a fine reflection on TCM and it's fan community.

 

One can't be in the *****, confrontational mode all the time or even most of the time. I believe in picking one's battles very carefully and selectively, while not forgetting to spread and share something worthwhile and positive with others.

 

PS Kyle, you're quite the site historian I see! That "1929" thread was really something in it's heyday!

PSS misswonderly: the answer to your question is: Certainly speaking for myself. As to my namesake, I would guess that she could dish out a little confrontationalism, especially when she was fired up on her favorite beverage, "Old Overholt" rye! That stuff could make a mouse roar!

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> {quote:title=ThelmaTodd wrote:}{quote}

> PSS misswonderly: the answer to your question is: Certainly speaking for myself. As to my namesake, I would guess that she could dish out a little confrontationalism, especially when she was fired up on her favorite beverage, "Old Overholt" rye! That stuff could make a mouse roar!

Yeah Thelma, however the problem with "Old Overholt" was that people were often very likely to pull their car into their garage and forget to turn off their ignition after drinkin' the stuff!

 

Of course, as you probably know, there always were some other "theories" about one particular incident such as this which involved one particular actress which you're apparently familiar with. ;)

 

(...btw, as you probably ALSO know, one can still see what remains of Thelma Todd's old restaurant along PCH in Pacific Palisades...I used to drive past it often when I lived in SoCal)

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Dear Dargo,

 

There is a LOT that can be said about her life (and death) and work! It's true that her Sidewalk Cafe building still stands. It has even been visited by paranormal researchers. It's all worthy of it's own thread! Somehow the word "nerd" doesn't seem to fit her. This isn't the place to build a shrine to her memory!

 

Ps: Rye whiskey was very popular in her day. Has anyone else tried "Old Overholt"?

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Thelma, I don't much about Ms. Todd. Most of my knowledge of her is as the "college widow" in Horse Feathers. I thought when you said you get riled up you meant that you behaved like the college widow, which is very naughty indeed!

 

From Wikipedia:

 

"A term that occurs often in Horse Feathers, but may not be familiar to modern viewers, is college widow. The somewhat derogatory term referred to a woman who stays in college after graduation in order to find a husband. It is used to describe Connie Bailey. Such women were considered "easy".

 

 

And from Yahoo UK:

 

"A college widow was usually the younger wife of a deceased faculty member or college president, whose campus presence was a "danger" to young men, since she was a bit older and more experienced."

 

 

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Hi there swithin,

 

Let me ask the community, as I have not tackled with the bells and whistles around here for some time- is it possible to embed youtube panels on these threads, the kind that can be activated by a click on the picture panel? I think that would be more compelling and interactive than just posting the textual hyperlink.

 

If that's possible, I might (and I'm not promising) dedicate a thread to her films along those lines. Her filmography is extensive, as she appeared in about a 150 films. A number of these films have been posted to youtube. I could easily put together a presentation that would be the cyber equivalent of a "Summer Under The Stars" 24 hour marathon! Do current TCM rules allow this kind of youtube posting? Besides giving people a chance to become better familiar with her film work,such a thread would be an ideal place to discuss her controversial life associations and even more controversial death. It might be fitting; I've used her name often enough around here!

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Thanks swithin!

 

If I hear a few more yeahs from others, I might just do it! Her work spans the later silent era to the mid thrities, a period much beloved by TCM fans! Films of that vintage are an "easy sell" to our community! There was much going on with her off camera that would also make for lively discussion.

 

I want to know about the embeded youtube picture panels. I would prefer it to a hyperlink.

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musicalnovelty, your second paragraph intrigues me. Wish you would elaborate on that (not wanting to be morbid or anything).

 

And Thelma's mention of the Sidewalk Cafe and starting a thread on that interests me, too. Thelma, if you are gung-ho on doing that thread, I'd love to read it.

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You've just made me regret never stopping there during all the times I rode past the place on one of my motorcycles while on my way to the Rock Store, musicalnovelty.

 

Hmmmm...ya know, come to think of it, I'll be in SoCal again this November for a large British motorcycle gathering, so maybe I'll try knockin' on the door there and seein' if I too can get inside for a look-see.

 

 

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Dear musicalnovelty

 

Throughout movie history, I notice increasingly the strange phenomenon of "death synchronicity", between a star's role/script and immanent demise. It occured with *Thelma Todd*, when *Groucho Marx* in *Monkey Business (1931)* tells Thelma that she will have to "spend the night in the garage". She did. That's where they found her corpse. Or *Clark Gable* and *Marilyn Monroe* in "*The Misfits*", the last film for both of them. In the film, they both speculate about death and dying. They both died soon after. I'm sure there are other examples of this out there.

 

People are very divided about paranormal phenomena, some embracing the possibility, while others do not. Thelma's old place has reported a lot of manifestations and phenomena. I know of at least one investigation that occurred there. Her old residential quarters are largely unchanged, but closed. The new owners are a Catholic publishing organisation. If they say they saw and heard "things", I have no reason to think they made it up. I fully accept that someone here might have gone there and felt residual emotions and presence. I personally believe she died tragically of foul play, at her peak of her youth and career. As *Somerset Maugham* said in "*Rain*" "Them kind of dead don't rest easy!"

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Hi Dargo,

 

That too is a good eiree example. I'm sure we can think of others. I hold to the view, which is increasingly shared by some theoretical physicists- that reality is a synchronous fabric, laced with all kinds of correlations that defy mathematical defintions of "chance" and "randomness"

 

As to knocking on their door, I would advise calling them first! You might get a better reception. By all means take pictures if they will let you. Here's a link to them, complete will cool info and pictures of the building and her:

 

http://www.paulistproductions.org/about-us-our-building.html

 

The fact that the road on which she was found dead in her garage is located is called "Castellemare Drive", is itself creepy synchronicity. She had a fascination for mob men, (something that I believe did her no good), and "Castellemare" was name of a major branch in the mob! Time for the "Twilight Zone", complete with creepy "thurman" music in the background!

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> {quote:title=EugeniaH wrote:}{quote}musicalnovelty, your second paragraph intrigues me. Wish you would elaborate on that (not wanting to be morbid or anything).

>

I guess I was assuming that everyone here knew at least the basics of Thelma Todd's death.

She died in that garage and since it still looks exactly the same (at least it still did last time I was there) and one can peek in through a tiny window if the doors are closed, it is just very sad to think that this is the very place where the beloved Thelma Todd died. It's easy to get emotional being right there where such a sad event happened.

 

 

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> {quote:title=ThelmaTodd wrote:}{quote}

> As to knocking on their door, I would advise calling them first! You might get a better reception. By all means take pictures if they will let you. Here's a link to them, complete with cool info and pictures of the building and her:

>

> http://www.paulistproductions.org/about-us-our-building.html

>

That is a good idea. Security concerns have changed significantly even just since the last time I was there. One may not be welcome any more even wandering around exploring the area outside and up the hill where the garage and Roland West house are, like I was able to do several times way back in the 1990's.

 

Fun fact about Thelma's Sidewalk Cafe:

Watch the 1958 movie MURDER BY CONTRACT and about ten minutes in the main characters take a drive down the Pacific Coast Highway and sure enough they pass Thelma's place. We get a good (but too brief) look at it as of 1958.

 

That was a good idea about starting a separate thread for Thelma discussions. Maybe a Moderator can look over what has already been posted here about Thelma and move those posts from here and turn them into a new thread on Thelma.

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Dear musicalnovelty,

 

 

This subject really continues to have traction and a half life like that of Plutonium! It's truly worthy of it's own thread! Her death continues to be one of the great unsolved mysteries of Hollywood! The toddling town has never forgotten her. I am all for the moderator moving the posts to a dedicated thread. First, let's see about building one!

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Oh yes, I know the basics of it, but I guess the way you posted your message made me think that there was something particularly unusual about the scene. But of course, I can understand anyone getting emotional seeing the place where someone died. My friend took me by OJ Simpson's mansion years ago, and it was very creepy and disconcerting.

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> {quote:title=darkblue wrote:}{quote}You recently watched 'Murder by Contract'? I thought I was the only person who remembered that wonderfully offbeat small gem. Well, me and Tarantino anyway.

 

Well I haven't exactly watched it "recently" but have seen it several times and have a video copy around here someplace.

It was so cool the first time I saw it and saw where the guys were driving and I said "They're headin' for Thelma's place" and to see that they really did! As I mentioned they drove by it, but it was so cool to see it in a movie.

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Beautifully-written and passionate post, Thelma !

 

I'm just going to explore the whole "what we make of words" idea for a minute. I may be verging into dangerous territory, so I want to state unequivocally that I'm merely making an observation, not advocating an opinion or making a call to arms.

I also don't want to trivialize what were and still are very important concerns and issues for some "minority" groups ( I only put quotation marks around the word "minority" because I think there's a better word for what I mean, and I'm afraid I can't bring it to mind offhand.)

 

The best example I can think of is the word "queer", which for years was used as a negative term for gay people. But over the past decade or so, the gay community has embraced the word, made it their own, sort of "re-appropriated" it, and now use it all the time in a positive way.

 

Perhaps so-called "nerds" could do the same thing.

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