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What old movie stars autographs do you have?


BetteDavis19
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Before I start, I like to state that for myself, I never understood the logic of wanting a signed autograph of *anything* unless its to have an object to make big bucks i.e the Derek Jeter's 3,000th hit baseball.

 

If you are a collector, make certain these autographed photos are authenticated or you *were there* asking for an autograph and getting it.

I've learned that many of these signed photos, baseball cards can be fake, that is forged by a publicitist or stamped. This is why I think this stuff don't sell on Ebay or other auction sites.

 

Don't you love to watch those special events or segments with screaming fans saying, can I have your autograph? as if that celebrity was the second coming? :^0

 

There is an object of interest, a check signed by Clark Gable. If you want his autograph, click and save to My Documents. I assume it didn't bounce. :P

 

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We all have our little hobbies, so I can't say anything bad about autograph collecting except buyer beware when spending big bucks for one. And how does one really authenticate an autograph? For me the only value of an autograph is if its personal; if I had an autograph from someone I met personally or it was handed down to me , like if my grandfather met Babe Ruth and the Babe signed a card for him. And Grandpa gave it to my Dad, who gave it to me. More of a sentimental value, not a dollar and cents one.

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*And how does one really authenticate an autograph? For me the only value of an autograph is if its personal; if I had an autograph from someone I met personally*

 

And sometimes not even then. I heard an anecdote about a time when Mickey Mantle was signing baseballs at a sports memorabilia show. At one point, as a "joke," he handed a ball to an assistant who signed it as "Mickey Mantle" and then the real Mantle handed it back to an eager young boy who thought, of course, that he had the Yankee star's autograph. Apparently Mantle thought this was pretty funny.

 

I've also heard that it's quite difficult to authenticate Bob Hope's autograph since he had a secretary that was very good at faking his signature.

 

In spite of the Hope tale, autographs that I've received through the mail over the years have come from Lon Chaney Jr., James Cagney, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (a two page typed letter!), Marlene Dietrich, Olivia de Havilland, and Jane Russell, who sent a real sweetheart of a response which even included her phone number since it was written on personal letterhead (I never had the nerve the call the lady).

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No autographs, but I've had the pleasure of meeting and shaking hands with

 

Elizabeth Taylor

Hedy Lamarr

Ali McGraw

Diana Ross

Jackie Onasis

Truman Capote

Sophia Loren

Ben Vereen

Joel Grey

My sister spent a few hrs. with Greta Garbo.

We both worked for a famous jewelery designer in the 60's, all the rich and famous when in NY were there. I spent 3 hrs with Elizabeth Taylor at the Plaza Hotel (Richard Burton was in the next room, but didn't get to meet him), she actually shook my hand at the end of the meeting and told me I was a lovely young woman. That has always meant more to me than an autograph.

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About the Mantle story, if its true then the ball has no value assuming that an "expert" will spot the fake signature. The kid has his cherished memory of meeting the star, if he ever finds out about the "joke" his opinion of Mick might change though. Supposedly Ted Williams' son forged a lot of his dad's autographs in his later years. So I guess the personal contact is what I would value most.

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I have quite a few but just to name some of the things that I most treasure (these are all framed on on my screening room wall):

 

Original poster from CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT signed by Barbara Stanwyck and Dennis Morgan

 

Original still (the telephone scene) from IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE signed by Stewart and Reed

 

Original still from LAURA signed by Gene Tierney, Vincent Price, and Dana Andrews

 

Original still from SWING TIME signed by Astaire and Rogers

 

Original still from REBECCA signed by Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine

 

Original poster from I REMEMBER MAMA signed by Irene Dunne and Barbara bel Geddes

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i collect old movie stills but i always avoid the ones that are autographed. Unless it is accompanied by a photo of the star signing the same picture, i just assume it is a fake autograph, either done by a publicist responsible for mailing out fan photos, or done years later by a dealer trying to add value to an otherwise unremarkable photo. It's just too easy to do. I'd be especially leery of autographed photos of A-list stars. (I would find an autograph by a lesser known actor to be more believable, since who would bother trying to fake that?)

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I once wrote to Rosalind Russell for an autographed photo, which she sent. Also Gypsy Rose Lee. I've worked with a number of movie and theater stars but never asked for autographs, though I did get autographs from Sir John Gielgud, Hume Cronyn, Eli Wallach, Anne Jackson, Tony Randall, Brian Bedford, Ralph Fiennes, and others. I've had my photo taken with James Cagney, Mona Washbourne, Luise Rainer, Maureen Stapleton, Robert Sean Leonard, Cherry Jones, Eileen Atkins, Pamela Tiffin, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Michael Sheen, Nanette Fabray, and Natasha Richardson.

 

 

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Wow! Lavenderblue19, you're really lucky! I haven't ever met any old movie star! And you even got to sit down and talk with them!

 

I think it's an interesting contraversy: what means more, a handshake or an autograph?

 

For people like me, who wasn't born at the right place and the right time to meet anyone, an authenticated autograph is all I've got. But, I would trade the autographs in for a handshake by the person. Because a handshake means meeting them, talking face-to-face. The only reason autographs were created was so that people could save the memory of a person. But, a memory in your mind is just as good, maybe better, than one in print.

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Jimmy Stewart gave me his autograph back in 1989, when he was at a bookstore in Washington, DC signing copies of his small book, Jimmy Stewart and His Poems, a collection of the poetry that he sometimes read on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. (You can see clips from these shows on YouTube.)

 

 

Because the line to have our books signed was so long, I had a good chance to see Jimmy close up while I was waiting. Even though he was 82 at the time, he still stood straight and tall at the chest-level counter where he was signing the books. It was kind of surprising that Jimmy didn't choose to sit down for the very long book-signing session, but he stood the whole time -- probably about 2 hours -- occasionally taking a brief break to stretch his arms and legs a bit. He didn't engage in any chit-chat, probably to keep the line moving, but when folks made comments to him about how much they enjoyed his work, he gave the person a quick smile with a glint in his eye. Sometimes when I'm watching a Stewart film like The Philadelphia Story or Rear Window, I'll remind myself that I once stood just a couple feet away from him and exchanged friendly smiles.

 

 

Coincidentally, at the same DC bookstore a few years later, I once almost ran into Tony Curtis -- quite literally. I was browsing in the store during my lunch hour, having no idea that any special event was planned, when, hearing some commotion, I looked up and saw Mr. Curtis a few feet away, coming straight toward me with his hand out, ready to shake mine. I would gladly have shaken his hand, but at the last moment, the woman with him (whom I assume was from his publisher) gently guided him away, toward the area of the store where the book-signing was to take place. (By that time, the line for the signing, which I hadn't noticed, was so long that I didn't have time to wait for his autograph in a book -- shoot!)

 

 

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Memories in your head fade; an autograph, properly preserved, lasts forever. Who wouldn't trade the memories of a thousand people who say Laurette Taylor in THE GLASS MENAGERIE in the theater for one brief, five minute kinescope of what it must have been like.

 

There's no controversy here. A handshake is meaningless.

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> {quote:title=Filmgoddess wrote:}{quote}I have quite a few but just to name some of the things that I most treasure (these are all framed on on my screening room wall):

>

> Original still (the telephone scene) from IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE signed by Stewart and Reed

>

FG, I too have an 8x10 RKO lobby card of this movie and (now after reading some of these posts in this thread...supposedly) signed by both Stewart and Reed.

 

It's of the scene where Jimmy, standing in the Bailey's kitchen between Reed on the right, and their oldest child "Pete"(Larry Simms) on the left, and I believe it's taken just as the kid tells his dad that the neighbors have gotten a new car, and Stewart replies, "What?! Our car isn't good enough for ya?!"

 

I was just wondering what the signatures look like on your lobby card. Mine has what appears to be a black marking pen signature in large script signed as "James Stewart" in the upper left, and Reed's signature is much smaller and over to the right, and appears to be signed in blue ink and possibly with a ballpoint pen. I was just wondering here if the autographs on your lobby card of this film look similar to this?

 

 

(...btw, this lobby card was given to me as a Christmas present many years ago by my sister-in-law, because she knew that I had been a fan of *It's a Wonderful Life* years before it was to be "rediscovered" by the public...and btw, these are the only autographs, real or otherwise, that I own)

 

Edited by: Dargo on Oct 3, 2011 9:12 AM

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It's more than likely geniuine. James Stewart, almost to the last year of his life, was signing autographs for fans if they sent him something in the mail to sign. So was Donna Reed. Both were known to be very generous. And, the fact that it's signed in ball point pen makes it more likely to be geniuine. If someone were going to fake an autograph they'd do it with a pen that made a better mark.

 

If it's an original RKO lobby card, it could be quite valuable.

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Right now on ebay there is a collection of 60,000 autographed photos of celebrities, asking 1.6 million or best offer. If we all pool our money together, maybe we can bid. Nice to see how these tax breaks for the wealthy are being used to simulate the economy. :)

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