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TCM Family Recipes


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Thank you for the information. In addition to my guests the bones went to a neighbor's dog for a Christmas gift and she says he loved them.

 

The best prime rib I ever ate was from the long-gone Victoria's Station chain. This cut wasn't quite as tender butt my oven got it closer to medium well than the medium I wanted even with the right timing. Done right it can sub for its glamorous kin if you're pinching pennies. (Yes, I know the better cuts are supposed to be rare or medium-rare and some steakhouses refuse to fix them any other way but some of us aren't that bloodthirsty.)

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  • 4 weeks later...

My favorite way to do ribeye, is whole boneless ribeye, with a spicy rub, then hickory smoked on the BBQ, to medium rare. But, I'm sure it would be great, pot roast-style, as you did it. I don't cook them often, because they are expensive. You got a good price.

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  • 3 months later...

The next time you bite into a great piece of fried chicken I hope you appreciate just what it takes to make a seemingly simple treat.  My hat's off to those folks who can do it up right.  

 

I am Southern but not my mother and it was never served at our house; she just browned then simmered it until done.  When I was 16 and Mom was in the hospital Dad brought home a second-hand range with a deep fryer piece and I tried myself.  Everybody ate it so it must have been okay-or they were desperate-but it was my only try.  Most of the time I just used Shake & Bake or Batter & Bake in the oven.

 

I downloaded a few recipes and tried one today using a pan type fryer and letting it sit in buttermilk overnight as told.  Even following directions  to the letter it was "overbrowned" and I had to finish up letting it simmer a bit to make certain it was cooked through.  The spices called for did not make it all that tasty.  I shared a few pieces with a friend and she called it "okay"; the rest I will turn into chicken salad or add some B-B-Q sauce.  I hope the chickens forgive me.   

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Wouldbestar.. I used to agonize over fried chicken. My mom and grandma and dear old Aunt Daisy all used to just blow me out of the water when it came to cooking that particular meal. I more or less gave up. And years went by where I just did not fry chicken.. ever.

 

Then one night I watched something on tv (food network.. but to be honest it has been so long I can't recall what show) But anyway, I followed the method that they used .. and sort of developed my own way of doing the same thing they did and to make a long story short.. It worked great.

 

You do all the things  you normally do (w/ dredging it in the flour and seasoning, using hot oil in the frying pan, etc) but you only start it on top of the stove to get a nice crispy crust. and then you finish it in the oven. They used a baking rack over top of a baking pan.. I don't have one, so mine just goes on the baking sheet with no rack.And I am SURE theirs is the better way of doing it.. (and ha you'd THINK after all these years I would break down and buy a rack to use.. ha.. but I am too "thrifty" I suppose)  At any rate.. my chicken has improved a LOT just from making that one change, and it is now a family favorite. (success!)  

 

Here is a link to Ina Garten's recipe.. I don't think it was HER show that I saw this on.. but the method she is recommending is very similar. 

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/oven-fried-chicken-recipe.html

 

(and PS.. I do not soak my chicken overnight in buttermilk.. but I bet it is a great method to do it that way) 

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Thank you, Rohanaka.  I'll try this sometime minus the buttermilk.  This looks like they'll be crispy, done and unburned.  I also found a much simpler recipe dipping the chicken in a seasoned batter as is and frying it up.  Maybe all I need is practice.    

 

I got my rack one Christmas at Family Dollar as part of a holiday baking set with 2 round cake pans, a small loaf pan and a cookie sheet for about $6.00.  The rack fits the cookie sheet so they get a lot of use baking and roasting.  Hope this helps you. 

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I must wonder if your problem with chicken is that the heat is so high. My only experience is with skillet chicken in which you flatten the chicken and rub in spices and herbs and then fry it on both sides and then place a weight on it to flatten it while it cooks on low heat. 

 

A recipe for it is at:

http://www.grouprecipes.com/37564/chicken-tabaka---simple-georgian-dish.html

 

I am sad to say that neither Barbecue Sauce nor Southern Fried Chicken are in my repertoire.  I have progressed so much that my Chili is now acceptable! :)

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My meatloaf recipe:

 

Pre-Heat oven to 350 Degrees

 

4 lbs Ground Chuck

1 Large Yellow Onion (1/4 - 1/2" dice)

1 Large Red Bell Pepper (1/4 - 1/2" dice)

1 Large Green Bell Pepper (1/4 - 1/2" dice)

1 Large Yellow Bell Pepper (1/4 - 1/2" dice)

4 Cloves Raw Garlic (peeled and pressed)

2 Pkg Your Favorite Meatloaf Seasoning or Onion Soup Mix

3 Large Eggs

3/4 C Water

Oil

Casserole Baking Dish

 

NOTE: I do not use bread or breadcrumbs in this incarnation. Nor do I use any added sauces or table salt as I have developed this version to suit my lower sodium diet.

--------------------------------

Oil the bottom and sides of casserole dish. In a separate bowl, combine Eggs, Meatloaf or Onion Soup Mix, Pressed Garlic and Water. Mix with fork until well blended. Combine all ingredients in large bowl and blend, using hands, until all are uniformly distributed. Turn out into casserole dish and shape into loaf. Bake at 350 Degrees for 1 Hour 30 Minutes - or until juices run clear.

--------------------------------

I usually make this specifically for cold meatloaf sandwiches on soft, white bread with mayonnaise and freshly ground black pepper. I do not eat this hot or warm.

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My fiance tried an experiment with meatloaf appox. two weeks ago.

 

He lined a half-sheet pan with parchment paper. He wove one-and-a-half pounds of bacon into a tight mat. I believe he used a pound of hamburger. He spread it evenly over the mat of bacon. He seasoned it with salt and pepper and did a heavy sprinkling of dehydrated onions, mushrooms and garlic. It was not a complete layer as you could still see meat under it. He sprinkled on Worcestershire Sauce and strings of ketchup. He then rolled it like a jelly-roll and baked it at 350 degrees for a little more than an hour.

 

It was good! It has gone on our list of recipes to tweak until we find proportions and methods which suit our taste. 

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I don't believe there are any bad sauces.. just different tastes. Here's a basic recipe:

 

I like my sauce very simple - tomatoes, fresh garlic and salt - that's it.

 

16 Large Ripe Tomatoes

1 Bulb Raw Garlic

Salt

-------------------------------------

Remove all skin from tomatoes - discard skins. Quarter tomatoes and add to halfway point in blender - liquify. Add just enough water to get them moving and liquified, easy on the water - liquify for 1 minute. Repeat with remaining tomatoes, adding sauce to a 6-Qt pot as you go. Bring sauce to the lowest simmer and add 6 cloves of pressed or grated garlic - stir. Continue to add garlic to taste every 15 minutes until you've had enough garlic ;-) - I start with 8 cloves and may work up to a whole bulb.. depends on the garlic. That's it. Just add salt to taste and refrigerate.

 

I don't prefer oregano or other seasonings. I especially do not add sugar - I find salt does a much better job of smoothing out the fresh tomatoey taste. Once in a blue moon, I will add bell peppers, onions and/or mushrooms. I don't dislike them, I just don't prefer them in my spaghetti dinner.

 

I will pan fry ground chuck until it's nice and crumbly - no chunks, then add sauce to my taste for that meal. Over the spaghetti it goes! Occasionally, I will add hot Italian sausage links rather than meatballs, browned in a pan for extra flavor, and some cold ricotta on the side.

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I don't do it often, but when I make spaghetti sauce, I use my mother's recipe, which she probably got from a Better Homes and Gardens cookbook back in the 50s. It starts by sauteing onion and garlic in olive oil, and when that is translucent, adding lean ground beef, stirring until it is lightly browned. I do add oregano, and then add tomatoes, and tomato paste. Then, the heat is turned down to a very low simmer, for 2 - 3 hours. Then, I add some mushrooms, and a little red wine. Simmer for just a while longer, until the mushrooms are cooked. The oregano, wine, mushrooms, and extra garlic, are tweaks of my own. We lived in Venezuela in the late 50s. While we were there, an Italian coworker of my dad seemed to have a sixth sense about when my mom was cooking it. He would show up at dinner time, and we would ask him to stay. He loved it!

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I don't prefer oregano or other seasonings. I especially do not add sugar - I find salt does a much better job of smoothing out the fresh tomatoey taste. Once in a blue moon, I will add bell peppers, onions and/or mushrooms. I don't dislike them, I just don't prefer them in my spaghetti dinner.

 

I find that vodka smooths the taste and brings out flavors which are otherwise lost.

 

Some flavors are water-soluble and others are fat-soluble. The human tongue can detect only those flavors which are dissolved. Simmering enhances food because it dissolves many more water-soluble molecules than can be dissolved during the short exposure to saliva during chewing.

 

Many recipes stipulate sauteing garlic because a large array of its flavors are fat-soluble only and remain bound if there is no fat to dissolve them. This is true also of onions, peppers, mushrooms and many other foods used as seasonings. Most fat-soluble molecules will dissolve in alcohol.

 

One need not fear adding vodka to a food which is to simmer for considerable time. The excess alcohol will evaporate. What remains is only that which is supersaturated with dissolved flavors. 

 

Wine, whiskey and other alcohol-based mixtures are used often also but these add their own flavors or have oils or acids which may have undesirable effects.

 

Only vodka can serve the purpose of bringing out the flavor of the food while maintaining purity.

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I find that vodka smooths the taste and brings out flavors which are otherwise lost.

We used to have chili parties in New York at some guys house who (was said) was the son of the Executive Vice President of Seagrams. This was an older, wooden house of no great beauty. Me and a couple of friends would drive up to NY from Northern Virginia and commence to 2 days of combining and blending in the the magic pots. There were several china cabinets packed full of all sorts of alcoholic beverages and more than a few made their way into the chili pots. Surprisingly, our chili turned out rather well, if memory serves.

 

I'm almost sure there was some vodka involved.. somewhere.

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A very delicious addition to a standard marinara is turning it into a Vodka Sauce. I've been making this for years and everyone loves it.

 

I simmer marinara sauce ( homemade) with 1 cup of vodka over low heat until it's reduced by about 1/4

takes about 20 minutes

Stir in about 1/2 cup of heavy cream (must be room temp so it doesn't curdle)) low heat till sauce is heated through

remove from heat, stir in 1/2 cup of grated parmesan cheese, 1/2 teas salt, 1/4 teas pepper 

 

I've used this sauce with penne also used it with rigatoni

 

Sans,you're correct. The Vodka cuts the heaviness of the cream

 

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A very delicious addition to a standard marinara is turning it into a Vodka Sauce. I've been making this for years and everyone loves it.

 

I simmer marinara sauce ( homemade) with 1 cup of vodka over low heat until it's reduced by about 1/4

takes about 20 minutes

Stir in about 1/2 cup of heavy cream (must be room temp so it doesn't curdle)) low heat till sauce is heated through

remove from heat, stir in 1/2 cup of grated parmesan cheese, 1/2 teas salt, 1/4 teas pepper 

 

I've used this sauce with penne also used it with rigatoni

 

Sans,you're correct. The Vodka cuts the heaviness of the cream

You're right. I will often add heavy cream and Romano to a pan full of chopped tomatoes which have rendered their liquid - this makes a great pasta sauce. I'm hungry..

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You're right. I will often add heavy cream and Romano to a pan full of chopped tomatoes which have rendered their liquid - this makes a great pasta sauce. I'm hungry..

:) So am I and could go for a serving of that pasta with vodka sauce, except for the calories :(

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:) So am I and could go for a serving of that pasta with vodka sauce, except for the calories :(

So.. we're going to change the name of this thread to TCM Family (Vodka) Recipes..?

:P

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As the original poster of the thread.. and a resident teetotaler.. ha.. I would have to object. I  mean.. wouldn't want to start any rumors or anything about how I suddenly turned in my membership card to the "Carrie Nation Saloon Bashing Club" (or would that be an ax instead of a club?)  :)

 

Having said that. I have had a few dishes prepared in similar fashion to those being described here and I do agree.. some are truly delicious. :)  So I guess others should feel free to imbibe. I'll save my liquor consumption for the pasta. 

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As the original poster of the thread.. and a resident teetotaler.. ha.. I would have to object. I  mean.. wouldn't want to start any rumors or anything about how I suddenly turned in my membership card to the "Carrie Nation Saloon Bashing Club" (or would that be an ax instead of a club?)   :)

 

Having said that. I have had a few dishes prepared in similar fashion to those being described here and I do agree.. some are truly delicious. :)  So I guess others should feel free to imbibe. I'll save my liquor consumption for the pasta. 

:lol:

You've got a great avatar, BTW. I like that.

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As the original poster of the thread.. and a resident teetotaler.. ha.. I would have to object. I  mean.. wouldn't want to start any rumors or anything about how I suddenly turned in my membership card to the "Carrie Nation Saloon Bashing Club" (or would that be an ax instead of a club?)   :)

 

Having said that. I have had a few dishes prepared in similar fashion to those being described here and I do agree.. some are truly delicious. :)  So I guess others should feel free to imbibe. I'll save my liquor consumption for the pasta.

Ro, try my vodka sauce recipe. The vodka basically evaporates just cuts thru the heaviness of the cream, but adds a nice zing to the dish. It is delicious ( only drawback is it's 1000's of calories!)

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Thanks Lavenderblue,

 

But I probably will just have to continue enjoying it at the restaurants. (I have also had several dishes made with various wine sauces that I really enjoy too) But I don't know if I would ever try making any  of them at home or not. Ha.. just because there is that whole buying the Vodka or wine thing that would have to happen first :D

 

Because, I know it does burn off in the cooking, so that is why I don't mind eating it.. ha. But just imagine my dismay if I would have to figure out how to answer all the questions. First from my 11 yr old kidling who knows we do not have those items in our home.. ever. And then from all the other gazillion people who know me. Because you KNOW they will all show up at the store that day.. the one day when I buy booze. ha.  The minuite i picked up the bottle and put it in my cart, all 51 little girls  in the scout troop I coordinate at our church would somehow all manage to arrive at the store to go shopping with their mom's at the same time. :D

 

I can picture their wide-eyed amazement and hear the gasps of shock and disbelief now..

 

"Why Mrs. Ro.. what oh WHAT is that in your cart??" :D   

 

OH.. and THEN when I got home.. all my extended family (many who drink but know that I don't) would all show up to visit when I was standing there with the open bottle cooking.

 

Woo. Yeah.. ha.. that would be hilarious. What can I say.. I think I am just lucky that way. :D

 

PS: Kid.. thank for the feedback on my pic of sweet Jane. She is a favorite of mine. :)

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I just peeled this off my package of country ribs I'm smoking tomorrow.  It won't work for me right now but might for all of you working with spare, baby back or St. Louis ribs.  You probably have all this stuff on hand.  If it's good, thank Winn-Dixie.

 

2 slabs ribs

1 cup ketchup

1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 1/2 cups cherry cola-I'll bet Dr. Pepper works too. 

1/4 cup vinegar

2 teaspoons paprika

2 teaspoons chili powder 

1 teaspoon pepper

1 medium chopped onion

 

Prepare a medium-hot banked fire in covered kettle style grill.  Cut each slab of ribs into four pieces.  Place rib-side down over indirect heat and grill for 1 1/4 hours.  

 

Meanwhile in a saucepan combine ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, cola, vinegar, paprika, chili powder, pepper and onion; simmer 10-15 minutes , stirring occasionally.

 

Baste ribs generously with sauce and continue to cook about 20-30 minutes, basting and turning often until ribs are nicely glazed. 

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