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TCM Family Recipes


rohanaka

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{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}This was our Friday night dinner when I was a child only Mom used four cans of tuna rather than hamburger meat. This Catholic version went down pretty well too. We'd go to the grocery store afterwards, put it all in the fridge or pantry then split a half-gallon of Neapolitan ice cream five ways and watch *The Lineup* on CBS. It's one of the few happy family memories I have. The added mushrooms are a nice extra; a few breadcrumbs on top are too. You can use 2 cups of chicken, turkey or ham as well and substitute cream of chicken, celery or broccoli or cheddar cheese soup. Slop it is not!{font}

 

 

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I love this, Jack! I wonder if there are cards with the Telstar and Santa? Something to peruse at the antique shops.

 

My family had one form of slop, but we didn't call it that. It was called Italian hotdish. (apparently, we didn't know many Italians)

 

Like wouldbestar, it is a fond memory of mine, growing up in Minnesota. It was canned tomatoes and macaroni and packaged spaghetti sauce in the little packets like French's or McCormick's, and one pound ground beef. Fry up the hamburger, cook the macaroni, mix it with the tomatoes and sauce packet, top with crushed saltine crackers and bake in the oven a half hour or so. Then my folks would watch The Lawrence Welk Show. Those were the good days, when both parents were in AA, and dad danced with his two little girls to Myron Floren.

 

We had an tuna meal too, wouldbestar. Not nearly as tasty to me, but it marked darker times in our family, so I hope I don't ever have the need to make anymore. It was a can of tuna mixed with a can of cream of mushroom soup and some canned peas, served over toast.

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Hi Wouldbestar and Casablancalover . . .

 

I have to Agree with you . . . Happy Family Memories are the BEST ! ... Especially when 'Food'

is Involved !

 

I have to say that the TUNA substitute for ground beef is a very 'Welcome' idea . . . I'm going to have to try it the next time I prepare my sons' version of 'Slop', which as you've rightly stated ... 'It is NOT !' :)

 

Aaaah, Memories ! . . . I Remember, many years ago, my Mother had the Milkman to deliver, along with our Milk, a Gallon of Grape Juice, as an added bonus, every Friday. When my brother and I were home from Grade School, for Christmas Vacation, that particular Friday, for lunch we had Fish Sticks and Grape Juice. I can't remember what else we ate, but the Fish Sticks and Grape Juice lay heavily in my Memories . . . AND the movie we were watching, on that snowy Friday afternoon was 'Alice in Wonderland' (1933) with Charlotte Henry. I also remember the Warmth from our Cast Iron, wood burning stove that my Father would pour oil in the back. It was ONLY FishSticks and Grape Juice, but how that Memory stays Imbedded on my Mind . . . Memories are Rich and Beautiful ! :x

 

To this day, especially @ this Cold time of the Year, I always have to Prepare a Box of Frozen FishSticks, accompanied with Grape Juice for drink ! :D Of course, I'll 'embellish' the dish with Cole Slaw and anything else that might go with Fish Sticks . . . But when I prepare FishSticks and Grape Juice, it will generally be served on any given Friday.

 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSQ7tk8sBjrn5vpIrKxOkGimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcSeyNI-aR9TRGVzoxhR0qB

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRWAt1JNJmKEwDDTb6MpSHimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcSH85djHVBAbe9y27W8gVd

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JackFavell -

I wish to thank you for the card. :) It was not unusual for Christmas cards to have rockets on them as they were of great interest to children.

 

When I was small I preferred cards having the Snow Maiden.

11335.jpg

She is the granddaughter of Father Frost who is your Santa Claus and she helps him hand out presents. I was the Snow Maiden one year in my class. I gave presents to the children two years younger. It was a great honor. My costume came from my cousin. My mother altered it for me and she embroidered a spider web on it. It was given to another cousin the next year. Some of the costumes have been in a family many years and they are quite heavy with embroidery.

 

Our first home that I remember was in a grand home which was split up to house many families. I believe our part of it had been the apartment of a butler and his family. Nearly every room had a fireplace. They were of marble and went up to the ceiling. The only picture I can find of the type is:

Gothic-Mantle-FPM01118.jpg

I remember my father holding me up because I liked to touch the noses of the lions which were carved into the mantles.

I grew up believing the world was made of marble and dark woods and flaking gold leaf.

 

A traditional Christmas Eve meal:

Christmas%20Dinner.jpg

It is far neater than mine! :)

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Oh Sansfin, I can imagine how wonderful it was for you, being picked to be the Snow Maiden!

 

I grew up believing the world was made of plastic and mid-century modern scandinavian furniture. :D

 

I would love to install a tall fireplace shaped like that one in my house. It will never happen, but I can dream.

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h4. Or, the biggest candleholders you've ever seen.

In Sweden and Norway, most of the fireplaces of the nice period homes are like this one..heavily tiled stoves, more or less. I found them charming, and I believe they were good heaters, though this one isn't functioning for heat anymore..

 

post.gif

 

I am having lobster-stuffed pinwheel salmon tonight, and my local grocer-friendly seafood counter made it for me.

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Jan 8, 2012 5:57 PM

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> I would love to install a tall fireplace shaped like that one in my house. It will never happen, but I can dream.

 

I love the look of this one:

http://www.contura.eu/upload/contura/global/download/masonry_stoves/contura_460_high_pt.jpg

I am sorry I can not find a picture of it which is so small that I may put it here.

 

The only cost I can find for it is $5,600. That is before shipping and installation.

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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote}

> Was there some significance to the spider web design?

 

It is of my favorite fairy tale. I have looked on the Internet for a professional telling of the story. I can not find one which matches in all ways the one I knew so you will have to endure my telling of it:

 

There was a poor widow with many children. A pinecone blew in through a broken window in spring and it took root in the dirt floor. She did not remove it because the children quickly thought it meant they would have a tree for Christmas. It grew tall quickly because it had the tender and loving care of the children.

 

As Christmas neared the children all wished they could have decorations for their beautiful tree. The sad widow knew she could not afford any. During the night before Christmas Eve a spider spun its webs all over the tree. The children and the widow were all overjoyed when they saw their tree was dressed in a wonderful gossamer veil.

 

On Christmas Eve the first star shone through the broken window. When its rays touched the web it turned into threads of silver and gold and the widow and the children never suffered want again.

 

Spiders webs are traditional decorations. It is thought to be very good luck if you find actual spiders in your tree!

 

web.JPG

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That is such a beautiful story, sansfin. It reminds me of a couple of stories I liked as a child.

 

I really like spiders, actually . I always take them outside instead of smushing them. I used to be afraid of them when I was little, but now I like them, as long as they aren't huge, or hanging above my head suddenly.

 

My daughter picked up the tiniest bright lime green spider once at pre-school, and ran over to show her friends. It was no larger than the head of a pin. She said, "Look at what I found! A cute little SPIDER!" Imagine 15 little girls running shrieking from my daughter, around in circles all in an instant and you'll get the idea of the mayhem Alice's discovery caused.

 

If I ever inherit a fortune, I will get one of those fireplaces for my house. I love those Scandinavian ones, I've seen them before, usually white porcelain or blue, and so lovely. I wouldn't mind having one even if it was only for holding candles!

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> My daughter picked up the tiniest bright lime green spider once at pre-school, and ran over to show her friends. It was no larger than the head of a pin. She said, "Look at what I found! A cute little SPIDER!" Imagine 15 little girls running shrieking from my daughter, around in circles all in an instant and you'll get the idea of the mayhem Alice's discovery caused.

 

I can imagine! :) :)

 

She has made a memory I am sure will live in her forever.

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Hi Sansfin / JackFavell / Casablancalover . . .

 

 

I'm @ the 'tail end' of a bad cold and hadn't much desire to sit @ a computer ... just wanted to sleep. But I'm feeling quite better now after plenty of chicken soup and hot tea with lemon and reading these fabulous stories of Spider Webs and Fireplaces !

 

 

Sansfin, I just have to say that I am so enthralled with your stories of Father Frost and his granddaughter, the Snow Maiden, as also told in the Cartoons you've posted before. They are deeply enriching to read. Also the story of the Spider Web being used for decoration on a poor family's Christmas Tree ... and they're not having 'want' afterwards. It's just wonderful to hear.

 

 

I too, admire Spider Webs and will never step on a spider. If I see one in my house, I'll scooop it up with a piece of paper and take it outside or out the window. One beautiful experience I had with a Spider Web was, one day I came home from work and from my outside doorway, that led to the street, there was a small spider web being formed, up in the corner of the doorway. Well that evening it rained heavily all through the night. And very early, the next morning, as I was leaving for work, I saw the same Spider Web, still intact, despite the Rain, and Larger, All covered in Raindrops. And with the early Sun rising (since our house faced East) each Raindrop 'Sparkled and Glistened' like tiny Diamonds . . . It was a captivating scene ... and of course, no one to share it with, since it was very early in the morning. I didn't rush to catch my Bus. I purposely let it go by. I just had to sit there and watch this 'Natural Beauty from God' a few more minutes. I'll never forget that Memorable Scene.

 

 

And your being picked to be the Snow Maiden reminded me of when I was 12 years old, I was picked to play 'Santa Lucia'. It was the Swedish Pageant. All the girls wore white robes with silver garland wrapped around the waists and heads and long white socks (no shoes). And on my head, I wore the wreath with the candles. (Of course they were battery operated bulbs). The Church was darkened, lit only from the candles we held in our hands and from my head wreath, as I led the girls down the aisle, singing 'Santa Lucia' and other songs in Swedish. Afterwards there was feasting and celebratioin with the whole church. I learned so much, back then, of other cultures, as I am Mexican-American but raised in a predominately German/Swedish neighborhood.

 

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Oh the 'Fireplace' talk . . .

 

 

I so LOVE Fireplaces and Mantles. In our first home, we had a fireplace with a Large mirror in a Gold frame, hanging over it. Of course, being only 4 years of age, I was too small to see that high, but my Dad would carry me on his shoulders in front of that mirror and he'd dance around and I can remember the thrill of being so high and seeing our reflections. Now our fireplace didn't work. It was just for decoration. It had a decorative, cast iron piece that went in front of the openning. But I have to tell you that I used to be so fascinated just looking into that dark fireplace and just imagining a more fanciful world somewhere in there.

 

I also had the same fascination when I would climb into my Mother's Cedar Closet and sit on the floor. I can still remember the smell of Cedar mixed with her perfumed dresses. I always entertained the thought that if I squeezed myself into the corner tight enough, I would be transfered to another part of the house from inside the closet . . . such childish thoughts . . . !

 

So you can imagine my surprise when I saw C. S. Lewis, 'The Chronicles of Narnia . . . The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe'. :0 :)

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQyJlwpURIWynIXqrXZnV4

 

 

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ugaarte - I am glad you are feeling better, you have been missed!

I love your story of sitting on your dad's shoulders with the mirror, and also the cedar closet! I always dreamed I could get to Narnia. Sometimes I thought if I could swing high enough in the air, and jump out of my swing at the right moment, I might end up there or in Oz. I never made it. :D

 

In the fall this year, my daughter, husband and I were walking at a nearby nature preserve. In the middle of the path, a bright orange seed or fruit, just the color of a tiny pumpkin, caught my eye. I said, "Hey, look at this teeny pumpkin, guys!" and pushed it with my foot. Suddenly legs popped out from the underside of the seed, and it proceeded to crawl up on my foot! I screamed, as did my daughter, but then we started laughing. I shook him off my foot and we carefully tried to move him from the path to the wooded area on the side. I haven't been that freaked out by a spider in a long time but he was beautiful. They are called Marbled Orb Weavers. They look something like this:

 

Photobucket

Photobucket

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> {quote:title=ugaarte wrote:}{quote}

> I'm @ the 'tail end' of a bad cold and hadn't much desire to sit @ a computer ... just wanted to sleep. But I'm feeling quite better now

 

I hope you are truly well very soon. Many people fight their body and try to force themself to do things they should not. The body heals much more quickly when it is at rest. You should also drink many fluids and remember that alcohol kills germs. Brandy was still listened as a medicine until the 1960s. :)

 

> Sansfin, I just have to say that I am so enthralled with your stories

 

I thank you for your kind words. It is odd that so many things are common to me seem so strange and wonderful here.

 

> I saw the same Spider Web, still intact, despite the Rain, and Larger, All covered in Raindrops. And with the early Sun rising (since our house faced East) each Raindrop 'Sparkled and Glistened' like tiny Diamonds . . . It was a captivating scene ... and of course, no one to share it with, since it was very early in the morning.

 

That is very beautiful. Will "look at the spiderweb" ever replace "stop and smell the roses" in the vernacular? :) It should!

 

> And your being picked to be the Snow Maiden reminded me of when I was 12 years old, I was picked to play 'Santa Lucia'.

 

That must have been a great honor! I am sure you looked very elegant and saintly.

 

> I would climb into my Mother's Cedar Closet and sit on the floor.

 

I wonder if all children have a favorite place which is separate from chairs, sofas and beds where they should be and which are public. I believe the wonderment of a place all of their own is what C. S. Lewis tapped into for his stories.

 

I do hope you are healed very soon. Please remember that brandy is your friend!

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> In the middle of the path, a bright orange seed or fruit, just the color of a tiny pumpkin, caught my eye. I said, "Hey, look at this teeny pumpkin, guys!" and pushed it with my foot. Suddenly legs popped out from the underside of the seed, and it proceeded to crawl up on my foot!

 

Spiders come in an amazing array of sizes and colors. Some are truly as beautiful as butterflies. When I see one I have not seen before I try to guess what in their environment caused them to become that color and shape.

 

Spiders are friends of gardeners. I know of none which harm plants and they capture many harmful insects.

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I can not believe I had forgotten that I have this recipe! It is how to bake brownies in the military way:

 

MIL-C-44072C, MILITARY SPECIFICATION: COOKIES, OATMEAL; AND BROWNIES; CHOCOLATE COVERED (30 APR 1990)

This specification covers chocolate covered oatmeal cookies and chocolate covered brownies in flexible bags for use by the Department of Defense as a component of operational rations.

 

3.3.1 Brownie formula. The formula for the brownie shall be as follows:

Ingredient / Parts by weight

Sugar 23.0

Flour 21.0

Shortening 16.8

Nuts 16.0

whole eggs 13.0

Cocoa 5.5

Dextrose 4.4

Salt .03

Leavening As required

Flavoring Trace

 

3.3.2 Brownie preparation.

a. Whip eggs in large bowl on high speed until light and fluffy.

b. Combine sugars, cocoa, salt, and leavening; add to beaten eggs, and whip on high speed until thick.

c. Add shortening slowly while mixing on low speed.

d. Scrape bowl and whip on high speed until thick.

e. Mix flour, nuts, and flavors together and fold into batter; mix until uniform.

f. Pour batter into pan at a rate that will yield uncoated brownies which, when cut such as to meet the dimension requirements specified in 3.4f, will weigh approximately 35 grams each.

g. Bake at 350F until done (30 to 45 minutes).

 

3.3.5 Brownie coating. The brownies shall be completely enrobed with a continuous uniform chocolate coating in an amount which shall be not less than 29 percent by weight of the finished product.

 

3.3.10 Chocolate coating formula. The formula for the chocolate coating shall be as follows:

Ingredient / Percent by weight

Cocoa powder Not less than 8.0

Nonfat dry milk Not less than 12.0

Added fat Not less than 30.0

Lecithin Not more than 0.2

Sorbitan monostearate Not more than 0.5

Polyoxyethylene Not more than 0.5

Sugar Not more than 48.5

Salt (per 100 pounds of coating) 2 ounces

Vanillin (per 100 pounds of coating) 1 ounce

 

You may download a .PDF of the specification at:

http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-SPECS/MILSPECS(MIL-C)/MIL-C-44072C_24608/

 

I have not made it as I have not been able to find: Anhydrous Dextrose, Lecithin, Sorbitan monostearate or Polyoxyethylene in my grocery store's baking aisle.

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Wowsa.. all this talk of spiders is giving me the creeps. ha. I have to take the opposing view on the nasty little monsters. Whoever said they scoop them up on a paper.. I do that too.. right after I squash their icky little round bodies under my shoe! ha. (but really.. I prefer a nice big can of Raid.. ha. Of course the result is not quite so immediate but there is less mess and a less chance for them to get away.. ha. (I know.. I am heartless.. but the rule out here at Casa de Rohanaka is nothing with more than two legs (except the family dog) is allowed to enter our home.. and live. :D

 

PS: SF.. that is SOME Brownie recipe.

 

Meanwhile.. this weekend is the kidling's birthday and we took her and a few of her friends to see Disney's Beauty and the Beast (we were too late to catch it on 3-D this morning.. but we went ahead and watched it "regular style" as she called it.. ha. At least we got to see it on the big screen.. and gee.. it was awfully nice of those folks at Disney to re-release this movie JUST for her birthday.. ha) Not only is it a fun movie.. a sweet story.. and just gorgeous animation.. but HEY.. it also has one of my all-time favorite movie FOOD moments too...

 

 

(oh, I do so miss that Jerry Orbach.. )

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Jerry Orbach. What an acting powerhouse. I watched him for years on L&O, not realizing his Broadway side. I miss him too!

 

Beauty and the Beast is one of my top 5 Disney films. No list here. I think the tale is my favorite. It's message is probably the best, and I was reminded of that this morning reading about a book, _The One_, by Katherine Woodward Thomas. it is a self help book, and I had already been doing many things she's suggested, so I will attract love.

 

But this is the TCM Family Recipe file here, so here's one for this morning:

 

*Basted Eggs*

 

Pan fry eggs until just setting the whites, then spoon 1 tsp water over each yolk and cover - cook for the time needed to reciting of the alphabet, then check the eggs. Eggs are done and soft cooked when yolks are light pink. Don't over cook.

 

This is a recipe that works best with practice rather than instruction alone..

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Jan 15, 2012 11:35 PM

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This is Capuchin's recipe for eggs:

 

No-stick cooking spray

Bread crumbs

Sour cream

Ground turkey meat or sausage

Medium eggs (don't try Grade A Large unless you have a really big muffin pan)

Pork sausage

Herbs/spices

 

For each cup on a muffin pan, spray with no-stick spray, fill with bread crumbs, tap pan several times to settle them, pour them out. Spread 1/8 teaspoon breadcrumbs on bottom, cover with a dollop of sour cream.

 

Make a round of ground turkey about 1/4 inch thick and the same diameter as the bottom of the cup. (For my current muffin pan, simply slicing it off a roll is perfect. Depending on the size of your muffin pan, you may need to roll it out and use a cookie cutter or find another method.) Put turkey into the cup and press lightly. Use the bottom of a small glass, measuring cup, or something similar to make a small cup in the meat (this is just to hold the yolk centered) (for those of you so inclined to have one handy, a shot glass works perfectly).

 

Sprinkle on herbs/spices to taste. This can range from simple salt and pepper to thyme and rosemary or up to tobasco or worcestershire sauce.

 

Break an egg into the space.

 

Add more herbs/spices if you like.

 

Make a round of pork sausage about 1/4 inch thick and the same diameter as the top of the cup. Butter it with sour cream. Place on top of the egg (don't try to press it down!), sour cream side up. This should be level with the top of the pan or slightly lower. Sprinkle on a thin layer of breadcrumbs.

 

Bake at 375 degrees for 20-25 minutes.

 

Let cool at least five minutes before turning the pan upside down and tapping it so they all come out.

 

Because there is no absolute standard for the diameter and height of the cups on a muffin pan, you'll have to play with this a bit to find what works best with your equipment. The major things are the diameter and thickness of the turkey and pork -- you want them to touch the sides without a lot of fiddling, and if they're too thick, the egg might overflow, making a mess of everything (they'll come out taller than they went in anyway).

 

Depending on whether you use plain ground turkey or turkey sausage, what flavor of pork sausage (I prefer sage), and what herbs/spices/seasonings you use, the range of flavors is virtually unlimited!

 

What I like about them (besides the taste!) is that you can prep them the night before, bake them in the morning, and have the main part of a breakfast for 36 done all at once for about twenty-five cents per person (assuming you can keep people from coming back for seconds or thirds).

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> I prefer my eggs hatched. :)

 

Gordon R. Nelson wrote several cookbooks which contained stories of growing up in Alaska. What he noted on eggs is that they only had "boat eggs" which came up from Washington. They had been stored in a warehouse until there were so many it would fill a boat. This meant the eggs were always months old.

 

He wrote of the first time he tasted a fresh egg and he did not like it because there was no taste!

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Hi Sansfin . . .

 

 

Your Recipe for 'Capuchins Recipe for Eggs' sounds very Delicious ! I'm a lover of Eggs and try to find different ways of preparing them for my family. And this one sounds like a winner and something my family would enjoy having for breakfast.

 

 

Question: After the preparation time, should the eggs be soft, like a soft boiled egg . . . or firm ? And will the Yoke be 'Runny' or fully cooked. My guys tend to like a 'runny' yoke . . .

 

 

(I'm getting hungry as I type this . . think I'll stop here and go scramble a couple of eggs for myself !) :)

 

 

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> {quote:title=ugaarte wrote:}{quote}

> Question: After the preparation time, should the eggs be soft, like a soft boiled egg . . . or firm ? And will the Yoke be 'Runny' or fully cooked. My guys tend to like a 'runny' yoke . . .

 

The eggs are fully cooked. I do not believe you could do a soft version because the sausage needs to be fully cooked.

 

It has no great effect. He and I both like yolks to be warm and wet and we like these very much.

 

I am reminded of the woman who was learning to cook. She easily mastered many things. One thing she could not do is soft-boiled eggs. One day she put all of her effort into it and she still failed. They would not become soft even when she boiled them for hours and hours! :)

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